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Wednesday, December 06, 2006

Actions speak louder than words...The Meriden Rotary Club

Actions speak louder than words…The Meriden Rotary Club
By Andy Reynolds
Devotion, Generosity, Commitment to the Community…I could go on but it would not begin to describe the Meriden Rotary Club. Recently as seen in the picture above – the members of club made a huge contribution to Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. of $50,000.00!!! This is the largest contribution that the Meriden Rotary Club has ever made. It took hard work, long hours and full membership cooperation to make this happen. All I can say is that if there were more folks like them, the world would be a much better place. They deserve so much recognition for this act and we wanted you to know about it.
Sarah Bogdanski – Bourdon & Christian Bourdon from Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. said
“We are overwhelmed by the generosity and sentiment that was conveyed by the Meriden Rotary Club though their gift. The foundation looks forward to working with Rotarians on this and future projects that will benefit children. We are so grateful for the support the Meriden community has given us during these last three months. We look forward to the dedication of the playground in Spring/Summer 2007.”
Tom Barton, the immediate past President of The Rotary Club said “The Rotary Club of Meriden saw Noah's Ark of Hope and the Hubbard Park playscape project as an ideal fit for our organization to provide Meriden with an invaluable resource for its youngest citizens. From constructing Hubbard Park's swimming pool to erecting monuments at various locations in the park, the Rotary Club has enjoyed being able to enhance this landmark that is enjoyed by so many year after year.”
Dr. Craig L. Nielsen, current President said, “We saw the commitment of Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. and the Playground Committee and in turn felt strongly that it was the right thing to do and we worked hard to make this donation happen.”

What is Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc.?
If you visit www.noahsarkofhope.com, you will find out more but Sarah and Christian’s words on one section of the website say it with so much passion and strength amidst the loss of their beloved son, Noah.
“The main theme of the song “Seasons of Love” from the play Rent is how is the life of someone measured? With the recent loss of our son Noah we have had to look at this in many ways. What was the purpose of his life? How do we show others who never met him what his one year meant, what he was like and how he loved? What will be the ripple effect of his life? Can one year really make a difference? In Noah’s short life he experienced many things: hikes through Meriden’s beautiful trails, feeding the ducks, flying on a plane, swimming in the Caribbean, and playing on playgrounds at many of Meriden’s parks. He also gave so much to those who he loved. His life was measured in kisses, in giggles, and in milestones. Now we have found ourselves learning a new way of measuring life. With the creation of our family and community foundation called Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. we plan on doing just that. Our experience in losing a child and our parenthood is not a unique one – many parents who have lost children have contacted us. We are trying to focus on something positive - something that will give us hope. We look to Meriden’s citizens not just to support this project because of our family and our story but because of its importance to all families. It is a unique opportunity to invest in the present and in the future. This project will come to fruition for Meriden’s children right now. Everyone will have someone in their lives that could benefit: grandchildren, cousins, nieces, nephews, siblings, etc.
For the past two years, a playground committee of dedicated members has been working hard to get a barrier free playground built in Hubbard Park. We are joining in on the efforts to raise awareness and dollars for this project. Who knows? Children who play on it now may even bring their children here someday. Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. and our pledge to raise $100,000.00 for this playground is our attempt to pay forward all the support and assistance we continue to receive every day. We will be able to measure Noah’s life and its ripples through this playground and other future projects of the Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. Foundation. And for us, this playground will give us something to put all of our positive energy into – a place where we will be able to celebrate the life of our “little man” every time we see a child smiling within its walls. Is that not how we all strive to have our lives measured? In happiness, in love, and above all else, in Hope.”
Dawn Nierenburg-Reynolds, Chairperson of the Hubbard Park Playground Committee said, “The Rotary floord us. Yes, we came to them hoping for their support. We never in our wildest most optimistic dreams thought they would dig so deep and support us so lovingly. To each and every single Rotarian that helped to make this happen for Meriden’s children, thank you, thank you oh, and did I say thank you.

As Chairperson of The Hubbard Park Playground Committee and on behalf of the committee, I want to thank Chris and Sarah for believing in our work together.
You have to step back and take pause, the strength and bravery of this grieving family has compelled the whole of Meriden to give from their hearts for this beautiful, worthwhile cause, a place where we can all play together. And this is only the first of endeavors, the beginning for Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc.

The Hubbard Park Playground that will hopefully break ground in spring of next year is a barrier-free, multi-faceted playground that in the end will be a shining example of what we can all build together not only for our children but for all the citizens of Meriden and surrounding communities. The donation of The Meriden Rotary Club has significantly brought this project so much closer to its completion, but they need your help to reach their goal.
YOU as an individual or YOUR Company CAN help – look for the donation form in this and every issue and please send whatever you can. The Rotary Club has also set a challenge to see if you can match them. Show them that you can. If your company, organization or foundation would like to meet with a representative of the Committee or Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. please call 203.464.3088

Your Stories

A Christmas Story
by Sil Patterson

Memories of Christmas past sweep over me like a blanket of snow. My favorite recollections center around my Mother who influenced my children’s lives as much as my own. My Dad claimed all my attention as a young child. It wasn’t until I was married with husband, Lew, and six children that I realized who Mom was. People change and that’s part of the magic in my appreciation of Mom. She and I became close friends. All of the quarrels of my teen years vanished. Her prejudices disappeared. She and my Dad loved their 20 grandchildren and tried to share holiday festivities with their four children and families.
Mom sewed! I not only received dolls for Christmas; I received wardrobes for those dolls, from Peggy, my baby, to Nancy Lee, my teenager. I sat on the back porch steps and created stories with each change of clothes. Mom would stick her head out the door, “Silla, that’s enough. There’s lunch
ready—or there’s dishes to be done.” Ironically the fruits of her creativity caused a stubborn isolation in me and she would worry aloud to Dad, “What’s going to become of her? Our youngest daughter spends too much time dreaming.” I can’t remember how long after this it happened but Mom changed. I like to think Dad said, “Your Dad was and your brother is a newspaper writer. Why don’t you encourage Silla to write.” From then on Mom pushed me to put my feelings on paper. “A stitch in time saves nine” means so much in the fabric of our lives.
One Christmas Dad constructed a beautiful vanity for my oldest sister, Ginny, and Mom surrounded it with lovely peach colored organdy. We all valued this piece of furniture more highly than any other in our home. I remember my girlfriend, Kathy, and I cutting out a pattern for twin dresses and receiving lessons in completing them on the sewing machine from my Mom. We wore these with great pride for at least two Christmases. Mom taught my sisters, Nancy and Ginny, and me to sew. Nancy and Ginny excelled in dress making as they grew older. I stubbornly chose nursing and family over sewing and writing but I’m thankful that Mom continued to sew as a Grandma. She made pajamas for the boys, dresses and coats, and more doll clothes. We have photographs of our Cathy looking beautiful in her “red coat.” Our first Christmas photo of David and Cathy show off polka dot pajamas and smiling faces. We should write a hymn and title it “A stitch in time saves nine.”
For years Mom seemed less tolerant than Dad. She learned from Yankee protestant parents that one has to be wary of other religions. My best friend, Kathy, arrived in the USA from Scotland at a young age. We attended second grade in South School together. I thoroughly enjoyed visiting Kathy’s Mom and Dad in their small home overlooking the railroad tracks. My Dad’s parents came from Scotland also. He was raised protestant whereas Kathy’s family members were strong roman catholics. Years later Kathy talked to me about her early visits to my home. “Your Dad always joked and made me feel comfortable. Your Mom seemed distant and cold.” It’s strange that Mom took so long to change her attitude. Our lives nearly unraveled before she stitched up the holes.
Dad’s approach to Mom’s prejudice helped her. Mine did not because I screamed. Quietly and calmly he would repeat the story of his beginnings to his four children who never tired of hearing it, and Mom couldn’t help but listen. “Yes, my Mom and Dad sailed on a boat from Scotland to the USA a few days after they were married. We think they eloped. They had three children in the next ten years; I was the oldest (David), my brother, Nelson, and my baby sister, Agnes. My Dad, Henry, worked in menial jobs. One of them was as a grocery clerk. He got sick and passed away, leaving Mom with three children and very little money. The city of New York placed the three of us in a catholic orphanage. I was scared! My sister died at a very young age in the home. Mom took Nelson to her apartment soon after Agnes died. I would hide under the bed in the orphanage every time there was a thunder storm. Sister Anne reassured me, “Dave, it’s OK. God will take care of you. Don’t be afraid.” She acted as God’s angel for many weeks in my life and I will always be grateful. My Mom worked as a house cleaner and remarried a man who soon became an alcoholic. He and I never could live together so Sister Anne and the other nuns at the orphanage placed me at a farm in Goshen, CT where I learned gardening and raising farm animals but mostly patience. The Tuttle family showed me how to work hard and learn to love. Living there I traveled to Oakville and Waterbury, where I learned auto mechanics. I stuck with the automobile repair business ever since.”
Change takes a long time but the miracle of change amazed all of us. Finally, Lefty, my older brother, exploded Mom’s bubble. Mom and Dad’s only son chose a Polish catholic as his bride. “I asked Eunice to marry me. Father James will marry us at St. Anne’s Catholic Church. I have never been happier.”
This is a Christmas story because it deals with miracles. Mom lived to be 87 and outlived Dad and Lefty. Before she died she came full circle, I recall her words when she spoke of Eunice’s strength after Lefty died, “It’s her strong Catholic faith that keeps her going.”

Doing “Hard Time” at the Meriden Twin Movie Theater
by Nancy Valla

It all started one Saturday afternoon when I was about 8 years old. My sister, some lively neighborhood friends, and I decided to spend that time going to the movies. The Meriden Twin Movie Theater on Broad Street was our pick for the day. That would be quite a treat because we usually went to the Loews Poli. This show was within walking distance from our house on Cook Ave. We would have to get a ride to go all the way across town to get to the Broad St. Theater. Actually, this place was unique by offering two screens in one building. In those days no other movie facility presented that outstanding feature. It was all so exciting! Who would have guessed that one day there would be places to go that offered “12" screens. We would see the latest newsreels (not our favorite), 2 cartoons (the best), and 2 feature films. Admission was 15 cents, unless you were 12 or older, then you had to pay a whopping 25 cents. With another dime we could enjoy a bag of hot, buttery popcorn, or a large box of chewy JuJuBees which could be lodged in our teeth for a week.
Well, I honestly don’t remember what the movie was about, but I do recall that my friends and I didn’t find it particularly appealing. Soooo, we decided we would make our own fun. I got out of my seat and proceeded to run up the aisle yelling with great glee followed by my buddies in hot pursuit. Since I was leading the pack, I was the only one who was caught by a disgruntled usher. My disloyal friends who were behind me, witnessed my unlucky fate. They proceeded to disperse throughout the theater, therefore eluding the pursuing employee who immediately escorted me to the dreaded “Cry Room.” This was a place feared by all since it was the storage place for all bad little babies who managed to disturb the other patrons. Discomforted mothers were asked to vacate their seats and relocate their screaming offspring to this soundproof place. It had a huge glass window where the offending party and caretaker could continue to watch the movie in isolation without bothering others. How embarrassing, I wasn’t a baby, I was 8 years old!
As I angrily sat there alone in this huge empty room, I wondered how I ever got myself into this awful mess, and why I was the only one who had to suffer. My movie buddies were just as much at fault. After sitting for a long time consumed with feelings of resentment, I decided I would have to behave in public places. I wanted to avoid any more humiliating situations. I guess I had to learn the lesson the hard way!
My mother, the school teacher, was mortified that one of her offspring would have acted in such
a disgraceful manner. I was punished by not being allowed to go to another movie for the rest of the summer.....oh the injustice of it all. Didn’t I pay for this indiscretion enough by being banished to the Cry Room. I was being chastised twice for the same crime. Isn’t there a law against this? If that wasn’t bad enough, my mom managed to remind me periodically of my lapse in good judgement. I has to suffer in silence.
For many years I was too embarrassed to return to this theater. However, when I eventually went back as an adult, I couldn’t help but wonder if every older employee who looked at me, was remembering the infamous “Cry Room Incident.” I certainly would never forget and neither would my mother.

You Know Me Well
by Jo-ann Buccetti

You know me well
I am everywhere, everyone
needs and wants me
Once you have me - you don’t
want to lose me
As I am strong - I can make
you weak
I can make you happy
I can make you sad
Some fear me - while others
adore me
I touch everyone differently
I can move mountains
Your darkest days are made brighter
Without me - You are sad and lonely
I put faith in your heart
and spirit in your mind
You know my name
You know me well
My name is love !

The Anniversary of Pearl Harbor
by LaReine Foote (aka “Ma” )
I certainly remember that day! I was 15 years old.
A few weeks prior to that day my family had moved to a new home in a different neighborhood. I had to leave my friends on Hall Ave. We moved to Hart Ave. (Now Sunset Ave.)
Well, one day, a Sunday afternoon, I was looking out our living room window at all the snow on the ground. All of a sudden, a large car pulled up and stopped in front of the driveway.
It was loaded with people and I saw “Larry” the driver, looking and studying our house. It came to me “Hey, that’s Pop” and the “gang”, my friends from the old neighborhood.
I ran over and called them in.
Of course, in those days - no TV, no tape players, only radio and 33 1/3 rpm platters (records).
I was showing off a new piece of furniture, as the 5 of them were enjoying my grandmother’s homemade root beer and cookies.
It was a combination of radio and record player. I was playing some of the platters, when someone asked if we could try the radio.
It was about 2 p.m. or so in the afternoon, Sunday, December 7, 1941.
As soon as I turned the radio on, a terrible news came on the air. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii sub base had been bombed - a “sneak attack” by Japan. Wow! The guys said they were going to join the U.S. services, and all did soon after.
We all can recall President Roosevelt’s voice as he said “Ah declare wah” on Japan (his very distinguished accent apparent to us.)
I was glad my family was spared, but we all certainly were sorry for them who were killed.
I was amazed, tho, how it happened that we were spared? Why?
Well, Dad worked at the New London sub base in Groton. He was the electrician who had laid the cable and wired the first building there, for the federal government.
One time, he had been asked to move to Pearl Harbor and do his job there.
But he declined. The government would pay for him and 2 others (one could go as “house keeper” and one as ‘interpreter”) but he didn’t want to leave us 3 kids behind.
Hey, we would have been living near that base! Close call huh?
Well, in August 1945, that war was ended! USA dropped the “A” bomb (atomic bomb) on Japanese cities - they gave up!
That is what I remember about Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941.
P.S. There used to be a saying (a motto) “Remember the Alamo.” Now it was “Remember Pearl Harbor.”


If you can’t take the heat, the kitchen’s not the problem
By Maura K. Ammenheuser
Early December: a beautiful time of year. The holidays are just about here. The days are nippy, the nights frosty.
It’s time for the thermostat wars.
Murphy’s Law of Marriage states that spouses shall have opposite internal thermostats. Nobody ever tells you this before you tie the knot, but ask all the married couples you know and I’ll bet most of them will confess to having more than a few temperature-related arguments.
In our house, I’m the one who’s always too hot and my husband too cold. Somehow this isn’t a major issue even on the hottest summer days when we blast the air conditioning. But in the winter months one of us is always uncomfortable.
I’ll concede that my feet tend to get and stay cold, which makes me cranky. But if my tootsies are toasty, I’m happy to pad around in a 65-degree house in January wearing lightweight sweatpants and a short-sleeve T-shirt. My 3-year-old son, Ryan, seems wired pretty much the same way. So we function happily in our admittedly cool conditions all day. Then my husband arrives home.
David is perpetually freezing. Most winter nights he heads for the thermostat within 10 minutes of entering the house and ratchets it up a few notches. Pretty soon I am sweltering. For a while I attributed this to either (a) the extra heat in the kitchen at that hour due to the oven or stovetop running; (b) pregnancy; (c) the fact that late in the day I’m usually tired and steamed, so to speak, over minor irritations such as whiny children or the loss of my favorite spatula to the toy chest; or (d) a combination of the above.
But eventually my beloved hubby and I came to realize that our internal thermostats are simply and permanently set about 15 degrees apart. For me, a heat wave is any day over 80 degrees, but I’m willing to hit the ski slopes when the wind chill is at 20 below. David isn’t wild about summer’s most oppressive heat, but he tolerates that much better than, say, our family room in February. He doesn’t like to bundle up indoors, however, so rather than putting on a warm sweater, he cranks up the furnace.
Now, I won’t blame all of this misery on David and I hope he wouldn’t blame it on me. A contributing factor is our unbelievably persnickety thermostat. It’s nearly impossible to nail the perfect temperature, regardless of who’s messing with the thing. With the gizmo set at 69 degrees, I wilt. At 68 there are arctic pockets all over the house. So the correct setting, for me anyway, is exactly 68.5.
Which, unfortunately, is still about 10 degrees too chilly for my spouse. But he, too, finds that a single degree in either direction makes the difference between lounging in front of the TV in balmy comfort or actually breaking down and putting on another layer of clothing.
If our conflicting couple thermodynamics make daytime tricky, that’s nothing compared to our nights. We sneak around behind each other’s backs, tweaking the thermostat when the other’s not looking. David bumps up the heat while I’m brushing my teeth; I turn it way down again when our infant wakes me in the middle of the night to nurse. Nearly every night one of us gains consciousness at some godforsaken hour to gripe about the climate.
David (pulling the flannel sheets and comforter completely off me at 2:30 a.m.): “I’m freezing! You’ve got all the covers!”
Maura (racing for the bathroom an hour later, desperate for a drink of water): “Jeez Louise, it’s like the Sahara in here!”
It does not help that the vent in our room is directly over my side of the bed. (Please don’t suggest switching sides or rearranging the furniture. That would not only make too much sense but rob us of the pleasure of bickering about temperature.) I frequently awaken to an arid 80-degree wind in my face, making my skin itch, my brain ache and my sinuses congest. It’s like trying to sleep with a blow dryer aimed at your head.
So, naturally, I hit the thermostat. And when David gets out of bed in the morning, he’s a giant blue goosebump, making a desperate shivering dash for the hot shower to thaw the icicles hanging from his goatee. When I’m feeding the kiddies breakfast, he turns the heat up, then leaves for work. When I return from errands at lunchtime, it’s the Sahara again. Down goes the thermostat. Up it goes again when David gets home. Some day we’ll find the stupid plastic thing melted and the furnace room littered with shot sprockets and gears. How much wear-and-tear can a tiny tangle of dials and sensors take?
At least we haven’t resorted to anything that could potentially damage the house.
The home I grew up in was more than 60 years old. Despite its heavy, clanking metal steam radiators, it was an igloo all winter. So my parents installed a wood-burning stove in the den, just off the kitchen. It was where we spent most of our time, so we stayed relatively cozy until 11 p.m. Then we’d make mad sprints up the stairs to our frigid bedrooms to dive under the covers before the heat of the stove had seeped from our bones. To this day my brother prefers sleeping under heavy down comforters in a room heated to about 40 degrees.
The people who bought that house from my family – in July, mind you – immediately removed the stove from the den. My brothers and I wonder at the magnitude of the leak the den’s flat roof must have developed once that enormous stovepipe was yanked out. But that should have been easy to anticipate. We get a bigger laugh over what a chilly surprise the new owners must have received come the first frost that year, when they stepped from a 50-degree October evening into a kitchen and den that probably hit, at best, about 48.
Hmmm… maybe I should have asked that family to give the wood stove back to me. It would benefit us all. David could sit on it to watch TV, warming his cheeks pretty good. And when he’s done, I could put out the fire, let the stove cool, drag it into the kitchen and throw some raw meat in there. It’s big and metal and would make a dang good icebox.


Did you know about the Dollar Bill
Take out a one dollar bill, and look at it. The one dollar bill you're looking at first came off the presses in 1957 in its present design. This so-called paper money is in fact a cotton and linen blend, with red and blue minute silk fibers running through it. It is actually material. We've all washed it without it falling apart. A special blend of ink is used, the contents we will never know. It is overprinted with symbols and then it is starched to make it water resistant and pressed to give it that nice crisp look. If you look on the front of the bill, you will see the United States Treasury Seal. On the top you will see the scales for a balanced budget. In the center you have a carpenter's square, a tool used for an even cut. Underneath is the Key to the United States Treasury. That's all pretty easy to figure out, but what is on the back of that dollar bill is something we should all know. If you turn the bill over, you will see two circles. Both circles, together, comprise the Great Seal of the United States. The First Continental Congress requested that Benjamin Franklin and a group of men come up with a Seal. It took them four years to accomplish this task and another two years to get it approved. If you look at the left-hand circle, you will see a Pyramid. Notice the face is lighted, and the western side is dark. This country was just beginning. We had not begun to explore the West or decided what we could do for Western Civilization. The Pyramid is un-capped, again signifying that we were not even close to being finished. Inside the capstone you have the all-seeing eye, an ancient symbol for divinity. It was Franklin's belief that one man couldn't do it alone, but a group of men, with the help of God, could do anything. "IN GOD WE TRUST" is on this currency. The Latin above the pyramid, ANNUIT COEPTIS, means, "God has favored our undertaking." The Latin below the pyramid, NOVUS ORDO SECLORUM, means, "a new order has begun." At the base of the pyramid is the Roman Numeral for 1776. If you look at the right-hand circle, and check it carefully, you will learn that it is on every National Cemetery in the United States It is also on the Parade of Flags Walkway at the Bushnell, Florida National Cemetery, and is the centerpiece of most hero's monuments. Slightly modified, it is the seal of the President of the United States, and it is always visible whenever he speaks, yet very few people know what the symbols mean. The Bald Eagle was selected as a symbol for victory for two reasons: First, he is not afraid of a storm; he is strong, and he is smart enough to soar above it. Secondly, he wears no material crown. We had just broken from the King of England. Also, notice the shield is unsupported. This country can now stand on its own. At the top of that shield you have a white bar signifying congress, a unifying factor. We were coming together as one nation. In the Eagle's beak you will read, "E PLURIBUS UNUM", meaning, "one nation from many people". Above the Eagle, you have thirteen stars, representing the thirteen original colonies, and any clouds of misunderstanding rolling away. Again, we were coming together as one.. Notice what the Eagle holds in his talons. He holds an olive branch and arrows. This country wants peace, but we will never be afraid to fight to preserve peace. The Eagle always wants to face the olive branch, but in time of war, his gaze turns toward the arrows. They say that the number 13 is an unlucky number. This is almost a worldwide belief. You will usually never see a room numbered 13, or any hotels or motels with a 13th floor. But think about this: 13 original colonies, 13 signers of the Declaration of Independence, 13 stripes on our flag, 13 steps on the Pyramid, 13 letters in the Latin above, 13 letters in "E Pluribus Unum", 13 stars above the Eagle, 13 bars on that shield, 13 leaves on the olive branch, 13 fruits, and if you look closely, 13 arrows. And, for minorities: the 13th Amendment. I always ask people, "Why don't you know this?" Your children don't know this, and their history teachers don't know this. Too many veterans have given up too much to ever let the meaning fade. Many veterans remember coming home to an America that didn't care. Too many veterans never came home at all.



"The Tea Cup"
Submitted by Donna Mahon
There was a couple who used to go England to shop in a beautiful antique store. This trip was to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary. They both liked antiques and pottery, and especially teacups.
Spotting an exceptional cup, they asked, "May we see that? We've never seen a cup quite so beautiful."
As the lady handed it to them, the tea cup spoke.
"You don't understand," it said, "I have not always been a tea cup. There was a time when I was just a lump of red clay. My master took me and rolled me pounded and patted me over and over and I yelled out, 'Don't do that. I don't like it! Let me alone,' but he only smiled, and gently said, 'Not yet!'
"Then. WHAM! I was placed on a spinning wheel and suddenly I was spun around and around and around. 'Stop it! I'm getting so dizzy! I'm going to be sick!', I screamed But the master only nodded and said, quietly, 'Not yet.'
"He spun me and poked and prodded and bent me out of shape to suit himself and then....then he put me in the oven. I never felt such heat. I yelled and knocked and pounded at the door.
'Help! Get me out of here!' I could see him through the opening and I could read his lips as he shook his head from side to side, 'Not yet."
When I thought I couldn't bear it another minute, the door opened. He carefully took me out and put me on the shelf, and I began to cool. 'Oh, that felt so good! Ah, this is much better,' I thought.
But, after I cooled he picked me up and he brushed and painted me all over. The fumes were horrible. I thought I would gag. 'Oh, please; stop it, stop it!!' I cried. He only shook his head and said. 'Not yet!'
"Then suddenly he put me back in to the oven. Only it was not like the first one. This was twice as hot and I just knew I would suffocate. I begged. I pleaded. I screamed. I cried. I was convinced. I would never make it. I was ready to give up.
"Just then the door opened and he took me out and again placed me on the shelf, where I cooled and waited and waited, wondering, what’s he going to do to me next? An hour later he handed me a mirror and said 'Look at yourself.' And I did. "I said, ' That's not me; that couldn't be me. It's beautiful I’m beautiful!'
"Quietly he spoke: 'I want you to remember, then, he said, 'I know it hurt to be rolled and pounded and patted, but had I just left you alone, you'd have dried up. I know it made you dizzy to spin around on the wheel, but if I had stopped, you would have crumbled.
I know it hurt and it was hot and disagreeable in the oven, but if I hadn't put you there, you would have cracked. I know the fumes were bad when I brushed and painted you all over, but if I hadn't done that, you never would have hardened. You would not have had any color in your life. If I hadn't put you back in that second oven, you wouldn't have survived for long because the hardness would not have held. Now you are a finished product. Now you are what I had in mind when I first began with you.'"
God knows what He's doing in each of us. He is the potter, and we are His clay. He will mold us and make us, and expose us to just enough pressures of just the right kinds that we may be made into a flawless piece of work to fulfill
His good, pleasing and perfect will.
So when life seems hard, and you are being pounded and patted and pushed almost beyond endurance; when your world seems to be spinning out of control; when you feel like you are in a fiery furnace of trials; when life seems to "stink", try this:
Brew a cup of your favorite tea in your prettiest tea cup, sit down, and have a little talk with the Potter.



THANKSGIVING
By Ernie Larsen
11/13/06
Editor’s Note: This article was worthy of publishing any time of the year. Thanksgiving may have passed but the meaning of this story has not.
Thanksgiving will be upon us sooner than we think! What does Thanksgiving mean to you? I’m sure many things to many people; the origins of the holiday are attributed to the Pilgrims who landed in Massachusetts so many years ago. The Pilgrims original idea for Thanksgiving was to thank God and the local natives for their role in helping them survive a harsh winter and for reaping a bountiful harvest in the spring. That’s it, no football games, opening of the Christmas shopping frenzy, class reunions, and long holiday weekends. The Pilgrims first Thanksgiving festival was in December of 1621, it’s said modern day celebrations are modeled after this early soirée.
What should we be thankful for? I’m writing this a few days after the election and I think I speak for many that we certainly can be thankful that this most annoying and negative campaign, ‘silly season’ if you will, is now over. Beside that, what should we really be thankful for? For one, I believe we should be to be happy for what we have; what’s that you say? Take freedom and our independent lifestyles for a start! Imagine if you could not go to the store, go shopping, apply for a job, and go to a restaurant without the threat of being blown up, shot or kidnapped. This is a daily occurrence for the residents of Baghdad; both civilian and military. Not a place one would care to be, eh? Or to be living in a country that represses the population by intimidation and incessant propaganda, while the Prime Minister, who is a NBA basketball addict, has access to NBA games via several satellite feeds and watches them on a variety of high tech TV’s.
Sure, some of our politicians engage in some off-beat antics, but at least we have the right to vote and speak our minds! Think about it and be thankful you do not have to endure these same indignities and pretty much have free reign of your daily life.
Thanksgiving in our family brings together our immediate family, for the most part. In past years we’ve invited people who had no other place to spend the holiday or were unfamiliar with the celebration and tradition. The first time, in the mid 70’s, I was working at International Silver Company on Broad Street. My colleague who hailed from India approached me at around 4:00 PM, (mind you, our day ended at 4:30) and asked me “How do you prepare the traditional Thanksgiving dinner?” Well, that threw me for a loop for a few moments and I replied “Instead of me trying to explain everything to you, why don’t you and your wife come to my house and spend Thanksgiving with my family” Based on their constant thanks for days after their visit, I guess it this was a better option for them instead of trying to do it themselves. We enjoyed their company so much we invited them back for Christmas.
A couple of years ago my son mentioned one of his friends in his Master’s program at UConn and the fellows' roommate were spending Thanksgiving alone. His friend was from Pakistan the housemate from Spain. I immediately told him to invite them to our house. We always prepare more food than we can consume so a couple of more at the table would be no problem. I’m glad they came, they both were unfamiliar with mashed potatoes, stuffing was an unknown entity and cranberry sauce, well it might as well have been something imported from outer space, they had no clue as to what cranberries were, much less how they tasted. We had such a good time entertaining and educating these guys we hated to see them leave.
Over the years, my daughter and I have volunteered at the YMCA to help serve their Thanksgiving dinner. This is for those who have no place to go or do not have the means to prepare the dinner themselves. A very humbling experience, makes you truly appreciate what you have.
I think the point I’m trying to make is that many living here in the US do not know how really good life is here, they really don’t. Some who constantly complain that the government, politicians, whatever service oriented business or entity is not doing things the way they think it should be done must remember that they are fortunate they have the privilege to complain. What we take for granted others can only hope and dream for.
I’m sure most of those reading this will be spending a traditional holiday with family and friends. Take a moment and think about the ‘grunt’ in Iraq, sweating his or her butt off thinking about their families at home and how they’re spending their day; this also applies to the military folks around the world that are spending their holiday away from home so we can maintain the lifestyle to which we are accustomed. And of course don’t forget those who have no one with who to share the day, spending it at the ‘Y’ Thanksgiving feast, or one of the many dinners offered by local churches with many wondering where their next meal will be coming from.
So, how are you going to spend your Thanksgiving?
Reach out; donate to the food kitchen, volunteer to deliver meals or whatever to serve dinner, be sure your neighbors have somewhere to spend the holiday, just try and help make someone’s holiday a bit more special. And next time you complain about whatever, remember there are those who risk grave consequences if they do.
Above all, cherish the time you spend with family & friends.
Happy Thanksgiving.


What is your favorite thing to eat with your latkes —applesauce, or sour cream?
By Joan Goodman
Since The People’s Press likes to have polls, I thought I would have one too. Do you like applesauce or sour cream with your latkes? Or both? (like me) If you are scratching your head saying “What’s a latke?” let me explain a delicious tradition that is part of the Chanukah celebration in December.
A latke is a potato pancake, fried in oil, that Jewish people eat during Chanukah. The oil symbolizes the cruse of oil that the Talmud says miraculously lasted for eight days when the Jewish people rededicated their temple in Jerusalem in 165 B.C.E., after the ouster of the Syrian-Greek army by a small band of Jewish fighters called the Maccabees. (Maccabee is said to have been the battle cry of the Jewish forces, and also derives from the Hebrew word for hammer, denoting great strength.)
There is also an Israeli custom of eating sufganiyot (doughnuts), another food fried in oil. In our family we learned this custom from one of my Israeli friends, and gladly added it to our celebration by indulging in jelly doughnuts.
There are several other Chanukah traditions. First, we light candles in a special candle holder called a menorah and say blessings. On each of the eight nights, another candle is added until on the last night eight candles burn brightly. Well, really nine because we light a candle called the “shamash” (helper) which we use to light the other candles. The candles are lit to symbolize light and faith, carrying on the legacy of Chanukah of hope and religious freedom.
Another custom is to play with dreidels (also spelled draydel) which are four-sided tops with a hebrew letter on each side. The letters are nun, gimmel, hay, and shin which stand for the first letters in the words of the phrase ‘nes gadol haya sham’ which means a great miracle happened there. The person spins the dreidel and takes an action depending on what letter it lands on. You play with a “pot” of nuts, candy, or pennies in the center. Nun is for “none” or the player takes nothing from the pot. For Gimmel think “give me” and the player gets what is in the pot. For Hay, the player takes half of the pot. And for Shin the player puts a piece into the pot. If nothing is left in the center and the players want to keep the game going, they can all put in a couple of pieces and keep playing.
Chanukah is actually considered a minor holiday in the Jewish calendar. It is okay to go to work and school. Chanukah became a “bigger holiday” culturally as Jewish and Christian people mingled more. Gift giving is one example. Originally, this was part of the Purim tradition (a spring holiday) and not part of Chanukah. Later, in Eastern Europe, families gave children chanukah gelt ( money) on the fifth night. And with Chanukah falling in December near Christmastime, gift giving gradually became part of the Chanukah custom although it varies among families. Some give small gifts each night, some for just one night, some give a check for a certain amount and let the child decide who the check should go to (e.g. a charity of their choice).
Chanukah is observed with family and friends, mostly at home, and sometimes with gatherings at a synagogue. Our synagogue, Temple B’nai Abraham (127 East Main Street) in Meriden, is having a Latke Party on Sunday December 10th, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. So if you want to find out what a latke tastes like, and whether it is better with applesauce or sour cream (or both!), please join us. You can also do some Chanukah shopping at the Holiday Fair.
Happy Chanukah, Merry Christmas, Happy Kwanzaa, and Feliz Navidad.

Sources: The Jewish Book of Why, by Aflred J. Kolatch; The Jewish Home Advisor by Alfred P. Kolatch; and Jewish Family & Life by Yosef I. Abramowitz & Rabbi Susan Silverman

Help Hunter Christian Pageau Come Home for the Holidays! by Sharon Agli-Pageau and Adam PageauAs many of you may have already heard, our 14 month old son, Hunter, has been diagnosed with SMARD1 (Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress), which is both a progressively debilitating and fatal disease, with an average life expectancy of 2 years of age. We have just entered our 9th consecutive month of in-house hospitalization, of which 8 of those months have been out of state, separating us from our family and friends, to a large degree. We are currently with Hunter at Children's Specialized Hospital in Mountainside, NJ and have been of dischargeable status since the beginning of September. Unfortunately, with the status of the both the healthcare system and Social Services, we have been delayed in our homecoming for now going into our 4th month! It's a very sad state of affairs when a family has meet all of the requirements to exit hospitalization, and are then unable to proceed home due to Insurance protocols (our Insurance will only allow us to garner Nursing staff from ONE agency in order for them to cover the service). Furthermore, there is a palpable Nursing shortage in our State, and it has been very difficult for the varying Homecare Agencies we have been working with to staff Hunter's needs. We currently necessitate 16 hours of in-home nursing each day for Hunter, due to his special needs and care requirements. Our family has been working closely with one agency in particular, who seem to be having the most success in locating Nurses to staff our needs for home, however, despite their best efforts since September, are unable to offer us a complete schedule, as required for discharge from this NJ facility. We can't fathom how much longer it may take for this agency to cover the shifts unoccupied, and in the meantime, Hunter spends his life here, within a Hospital, away from his extended family and friends. Our hope was to have Hunter home by Christmas, not so we could proceed to enjoy a traditional holiday, as our time and focus will then be to train our new Nursing staff on our son's care, but to have returned Hunter to his natural, loving, appropriate environment, where he will thrive best. With the beginning of this month of December, we are reaching out to you, the people, to help us. We have placed Hunter's fate in the hands of various agencies for quite some time now, and they still have nothing resolute to offer us in regards to taking our son home. Considering his circumstances, we very much desire the time we have to spend with our son to be at home, not in a hospital. The only other solution we as parents can come up with is for us to personally hire Nurses to cover the shifts that are not filled as of yet, so we can then return to a quality family life, one that has been taken from us for such an extended period of time now. Our idea would be very costly for us, and is not a very feasible idea in the bigger picture. If anyone has any thoughts or ideas for us in regards to how we could bring our beautiful son home soon, or would care to assist us in our efforts to hire Homecare staff ourselves, we can be reached at the following address: Sharon Agli-Pageau, 665 North Colony Road, Wallingford, CT 06492. For those of you who have offered donations in honor of Hunter's medical expenses, we again thank you in the most heartfelt way. Thank you for taking the time to read this article and to help our son! God bless!

WORLD'S WORST CHRISTMAS SHOPPER MUST BITE THE BULLETBy Phyllis S. DonovanOn a list of the World's Greatest Shoppers, I must rate dead last. For some people, shopping is recreation, preferred entertainment ranking right up there with movies, baseball games and band concerts.
Many of these people have been happily strolling around the malls since last summer picking up Christmas gifts for everyone they know, selecting just the right present for the right person. Already they're smugly informing anyone who'll listen that they've just about finished their Christmas shopping and have started wrapping. People like that are easy to hate. To me, shopping is a chore, the worst kind of drudgery. Browsing in stores in not my idea of fun. And when those stores are crowded, forget it. I'd rather stay home and do without. At times when it's absolutely necessary for me to go shopping, I try to decide ahead of time exactly what I want and where to find it so I can run right in, pick it up and leave as quickly as possible. That's why Christmas shopping to me is like the Chinese water treatment - sheer torture! I try not to think about it until after Thanksgiving each year, but it gets harder and harder to ignore with "Christmas sales" starting before Halloween. It doesn't help that none of my family will give me the slightest idea as to what they'd like for Christmas. I'm lucky to wheedle sizes out of them on Thanksgiving day. Every year it's the same. I confront the perennial chore of buying gifts for them without a clue as to what they need or want. Tougher yet, I'm out of practice having successfully avoided shopping for anything but groceries for at least the past two months. So here I am, starting from scratch, poring over the piles of store sale inserts that come with the newspapers and trying to draw up a plan of action for tackling the chore logically so I can spend the least possible time in the stores. A consummate list-maker, like Santa, I believe in making a list and checking it regularly. It helps me keep my sanity when it comes down to balancing everything so I spend approximately the same for everyone each year. It isn't easy. This year, I promised myself that I wouldn't allow the dreaded chore of Christmas shopping put a damper on other happier holiday preparations. The plan, of course, was to force myself to hit the stores early and hard and put the shopping nightmare behind me.fast! Since I abhor crowds as much as I do shopping itself, I wouldn't go anywhere near a store on Black Friday. Whenever I see all those people stampeding into the front doors of the big box stores at the crack of dawn the day after Thanksgiving eager to scoop up the latest electronic wonder, I physically cringe. The challenge of the hunt is not strong enough for me to subject myself to that kind of madness. Besides, most people of my generation are at a complete loss when it comes to the latest fad items grandchildren covet. I find myself wandering aimlessly around toy stores without a clue as to what would appeal to kids 12 or under. Meanwhile, I must fend off anxiety attacks, tackle the job coolly and unemotionally. I must plunge into the crowds and do my duty as a bonafide Christmas shopper. I must pay my dues, earn my lumps and move on to the warmer and happier part of the holiday season. Each year I face the battle with more reluctance and less stamina. Wouldn't it be wonderful to just forget the whole exercise in futility and skip the perennial rat race of buying gifts that are unwanted, unacceptable, unappreciated, wrong color, wrong size, wrong style, too expensive, too cheap, too itchy, too gaudy, too fattening? I'm tempted to just give everyone gift certificates and let them do their own shopping. But then what would I put under the tree? And what would I do with all the time and energy I usually expend on Christmas? Why, I'd just concentrate it all on getting ready for the real celebration of Christmas, the part of Christmas I really enjoy, the part I never get around to until all that shopping is done.

NATURE AS A MIRROR
By Dorothy Gonick

Welcoming Winter Weather

Bleak November scenes
Of leaden skies and barren trees
Bedded down for winter’s freeze,
Dreaming of a warm spring breeze.

A skein of geese in pattern “V”
Honking greetings wild and free.
Scurrying saucy, squirrels
Hiding acorns in their tree.

Flashing red of cardinals,
Cheery calls of chickadees,
Downys pecking at the suet,
Blue Jays feasting on the seeds.

Glistening snow and ice filled pools
Delight the children home from school
Donning garments of warm knit wool,
Choosing skis, skates, or sleds to pull.

Flickering flames gleam through the grate
Toasting marshmallows to a golden fate.
Dancing shadows that do not wait,
Changing shape from early to late.

Weather changes—to harsh from mild,
There’s beauty in a tempest wild.
Just snuggle under blankets piled,
Revel in them like a child.

Welcome, Winter!

A Visit from the Animals
On Wednesday, November 8 and Thursday, November 9, the Hungerford Animal Program visited First Congregational Church Nursery School. They offer educational programming exhibits and special events that relate to science, natural history, the environment and other issues dealing with today’s society.
Nick, the Hungerford animal handler, talked to our 3-year old and 4-year old classes about six small animals that he brought to the school. The first animal exhibit was Milkshake, a light grey and beige, floppy-eared rabbit. As Nick held Milkshake in his hand, Milkshake shook with the prospect of hopping away. Many of the children gently touched Milkshake. The next small animal to be introduced to the children was a hen with thick, light golden plumage. Nick allowed the hen to walk around the children as he kept a close eye on it. Then he showed the children the mealworms that the hen eats. Although unattractive, the children enjoyed looking at the mealworms.
The children became more excited with each animal that Nick took out to show them. Houdini, the albino rat snake, received a chorus of ooo’s and aaa’s and a reluctance to touch him. A few children ventured to touch Houdini and were pleasantly surprised to learn that he felt silky smooth. Nick told the children that rat snakes like to eat rats, hence the name.
Salty, a white ferret, was the fourth small animal to be taken out of his kennel. He was very friendly, moving around the children as he smelled them. Salty wasn’t kept out long for fear of losing him. Ferrets are nocturnal so they are even more active at nighttime. A white chinchilla with black markings was the next animal to be shown. Also a nocturnal animal, he lives in the mountains of Ecuador, Bolivia and Chile. He has a very soft fur, which keeps him warm in the high altitudes. The chinchilla is an even faster runner than the ferret so Nick didn’t put him down on the floor.
Yertle, the box turtle, was the grand finale of the animal exhibits. We were informed that box turtles are land turtles and that the male has red eyes and the female has brown eyes. When a box turtle is frightened, it goes inside its shell and it completely closes its shell.
The children enjoyed learning about all the animals and touching them. At the end of the day, the children were asked to draw their favorite Hungerford animal. They were all admired by the children.
The Hungerford animal program is part of the New Britain Youth Museum at Hungerford Park. It is located at 191 Farmington Avenue in Kensington. For more information, their telephone number is (860) 827-9064.
Submitted by:
Triana Buitrago
First Congregational Church Nursery School

A Gift of Love
I lost my mother and brother all within 2 months of each other. Needless to say, I was devastated, but the unending love from our Great Pyrenees, French Bulldog, and my brothers 14 year old Bichon, who we adopted, in a way saved my life. There was always a happy, grateful, and loving face, wagging tail and a great big kiss, to make me feel better. In lieu of flowers to their funerals, I requested donations be made to the Wallingford Shelter. Since mother and brother loved animals, I knew this is what they would have wanted. I believe they received over $1000 in total. (Lisa at the shelter would know better how much exactly.) I knew that I wanted to help the shelter, but the town does not allow volunteers, so the only way I could is to get donations. I encourage others to consider this as a remembrance of a loved one. The flowers die, but the feeling that you saved a pet in need will last forever. So, when I sent invitations to a Halloween Masquerade party I asked everyone to bring food or a treat for the dogs and the cats. I was overwhelmed by the generosity of my friends and neighbors, and quite impressed with the costumes! Donations included, dog and cat food and treats, cat litter, kennel blankets, and a professional grooming table. I ask everyone to remember the animals during this season and donate food, blankets and of course money, to their local animal shelter and to adopt a pet before going to a puppy-mill pet shop to buy a dog or cat. If you need any more info from me, you can call me at 265-6549. I am hoping this will inspire someone. I work from home; I'm a freelance graphic designer and also have a website, www.50PLUSCT.com, so I am home a lot. Thank god for the dogs company during the day!Thanks a lot, TracyHERE IS THE EMAIL I GOT FROM LISA AT THE SHELTERDear Tracy Thank you from the heart for all the wonderful donations to our animal shelter. As Rachel and I filled our storage closet, with the treasure trove of gifts, we were amazed, awed ... and truly THANKFUL! When we saw our closet full, we realized this bounty will last us for at least three to six weeks, depending on the amount of animals. How priceless is that?! I'm over the moon! You've no idea how much this helps the fur-kids! You see, we keep all the fur-kids, until we can find them a forever home. The only animals that are ever put to sleep, at the vet, are those that are too aggressive to be placed in the public, or those medically beyond help. Everyone else finds their home! I had a fourteen year old calico cat for 16 months ... and I finally placed her with a sweet woman at Elim Park, that lost her dog. OH, Happy Day! Honestly, there are VERY few, I can probably count them on one hand, that ever get put to sleep in the space of a year. The reason is, they don't end up at a pound for any fault of their own ... it's most often, neglectful owners, NOT horrid fur-kids. They can't share their stories, they depend on us. To get to know them, love them ... tell their nature to those looking for love. I wish folks knew how many good animals they could get from a pound. I get every breed, shape and size ... from Standard Poodles, English Mastiffs, Bangles, Ragdolls, Yorkies, Pugs, Teacup Chi's and beloved Mutts ... you name it, they come through the door. When folks purchase at Pet stores, they are promoting puppy mills ... Agggh ... most from Kansas or Missouri ... horrid places for the most part ... *sigh* Each purchase keeps the horrid underworld in business. Unlike most pounds, we have an application process.. it's not like the old days, the way I choose to run things ... when anyone could walk in with their five dollar bill and get a dog or cat. I am legally able to put any animal down, seven days after an ad is placed in the local newspaper. Sadly, too many places do just that ... it's just not right. I could never do that! Sadly, the price for a fixed animal remains the same ... five lowly dollars. State mandated. This is why I’m so stringent on my adoption process. I recently adopted out a 3,000 dollar English Bull dog that was surrendered ... I know how much his former owner paid for him as he had all his paperwork. I found him a stellar home.. the new owners paid five dollars for Mugsy. My joy is that he will get a million dollars worth of love. They email me photos and updates all the time. They adore him! He deserved that! We are very adamant that they find a forever home ... not just to get them out the door. The last thing they need is more change, more moves.. they have feelings and they love their people ... UNCONDITIONALLY!!! They don't need to be dumped again! Rachel and I work very hard to try and find that FOREVER home of love. The elbow grease, cleaning kennels, exercise and such, is an exhausting labor of love. The food, treats and comforts are what allows us to hold on to them until we can find them their forever people. That is why your gifts mean so much! It helps us help them, more than you could know. Finding homes for these angels, all wrapped up in fur is OUR gift. It helps us deal with the cruelty and abuse we see on a daily basis. Yes, we uphold laws and handle on average 120 complaints per month. We are not like a humane agency that just deals in adoptions. We have tons of other work to perform too, which for the town, is our primary duty. There are days when our hearts are quite weary. Yet, looking at our alumni board, seeing all those placed happily, is what keeps us putting one foot in front of the other in our other duties. I only wish we could help more. We are not allowed to have volunteers in Wallingford, so our work day is always very chock full. We do it all ourselves. We are not like some pounds that euthanize just to end the heavy work load.... It is truly our passion, our calling. People say to me all the time, "how can you work here, I couldn't stand it .. I care too much!" I say, mentally, for I would never offend them ... How could I leave them, knowing I offer love, help and give my all for them to find loving homes? Yes, it HURTS my heart TOO!!! But I am willing to feel that pain, in an effort to help them ... that is "caring"... perhaps as they say, "too much." It IS painful, truly painful, but it has it's rewards. It's far easier not to look, to see, to feel or know. Ignorance is bliss ... but if I left them, and someone else hired chose to go the seven day route ... Agggh! :( So, we take the pain, and concentrate on the good. We have a fantastic adoption rate, as I believe there is an old sock for every old shoe. It just takes time, work, and food. Please extend my sincere thanks to all those who donated. Big hugs to you and James for doing this Tracy. You have really made a difference, something every good soul hopes to do ... YOU HAVE! Thank you!!! This evening as I handed out Greenies, pig ears and biscuits to the thankful pups, and treats to the kitties, my heart filled up. They have so little as they wait for their special home ... and they enjoy and appreciate treats so much. So pupper slurps and kitty purrs, all around as well. The food is Heaven ... Oh, how we needed it! It helps us so much to keep on keeping on ... for them! The grooming table is such a wonderful addition to our facility. So many come in abused, neglected, filthy dirty ... this will help us tremendously in helping them look their best! The truth is, they love looking their best too.Thanks,Lisa Seyler, Animal Control Officer 294-2180Rachel Amenta, Assistant Animal Contol Officer (In the picture)

Larry McGoldrick: Meriden’s Own “Good Scout”
By CS Purcell
Each day, hundreds of volunteers help make their community a better place. So each year, the “Good Scout” Award recognizes one of these individuals for his or her outstanding community service.
This year’s recipient is longtime Meriden resident and businessman Larry McGoldrick. He was honored at an award luncheon on November 16. Though, quite humbly, McGoldrick says, “When I first learned I was this year’s award recipient, I thought there must be someone more deserving. But it is a great organization, and I was very honored.”
Although McGoldrick might be humble, his list of community service is extensive. He provides leadership to many local committees, boards, and organizations. He is currently President of the Meriden Economic Development Corporation (MEDCO), Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of MidState Medical Center, Director of the Meriden-Wallingford Campership Board, Member of the Bankers’ Advisory Board of the Conference of State Bank Supervisors, Steering Committee Member of Meriden’s Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) and a member of the Meriden Rotary Club. Mr. McGoldrick is also currently serving as the Co-Chairman of Meriden’s Bicentennial Steering Committee.
Previously Larry has served as President of the Board of the Meriden YMCA and was Chairman of the Building Committee responsible for the construction of the downtown YMCA headquarters, which opened in 1996. He has served as Chairman of the Finance Committee of MidState Medical Center, has been a Director of the Connecticut Community Bankers Association, Chairman of the Board and Director of the Independent Day School and Director of the Chapel Haven Residence.
McGoldrick attributes his start in community service to the role models in his life. “I have been very lucky in my life to have great role models, starting with my father who was active in the community. As a kid I was involved with Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, and they certainly have a citizenship component built into the values.”
As McGoldrick got into the corporate world, he continued to be blessed with civic-minded role models. “The CEO at my first job told me there has to be a balance where you give something back to community, and he encouraged his employees to get involved. That was when I saw for the first time there is a corporate responsibility to the community,” McGoldrick said.
McGoldrick, who was the primary organizer and subsequently has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors, President and Chief Executive Officer of Castle Bank and Trust Company in Meriden, has brought that philosophy to Castle Bank and Trust Company. “One of the missions of Castle Bank is to be a community resource. Our slogan, ‘Banking where it belongs,’ expresses the local philosophy of the Bank and its deep commitment to the central Connecticut communities it serves. I encourage my employees to give back in a variety of ways, be it through donations or time.”
One way that Castle Bank is currently helping the community is by offering checks with Meriden High Schools’ colors and emblems on them. When the bank’s customers order or reorder the High School checks, Castle Bank donates $5.00 to Project Graduation. The first set of checks ordered is completely complimentary to the customer, but the same $5.00 is still donated. Customers can choose which school they would like to support – Maloney, Platt or Wilcox.
McGoldrick says he continues to be inspired by his civic-minded peers. “It is a team effort and you get inspired by team members.” While once McGoldrick was that student, he is now the teacher. He hopes that his commitment to the community inspires the younger generation to become involved, too.
According to McGoldrick, one of the hardest things about volunteering is that the fruits of your labor might not be seen in your lifetime, or might not be immediate. “I think people have to have a longer view to see that the things we’re putting in place today will benefit our children and grandchildren.”
McGoldrick’s love of his community is overshadowed only by love of his family. He resides with wife, Gail, of 34 years. They are the proud parents of three sons, Barrett and wife Tricia who live in New Jersey with granddaughter Payton, Brandon who lives in Meriden, and Devin who resides in New York City.


Just Some Hair
By Rita Pompano
My Husband and I were taking our twin grandsons to the park to try out the new Heelies we had bought them for their 11th birthday.
I was sitting in the front passenger seat when I felt a tug at the back of my head. A minute later amidst giggling, I felt another tug at my hair.
I turned around to find Drew examining two long hairs that he had plucked from my head. “What are you doing, I angrily exclaimed?”
With looks of conspiratory agreement, both boys nodded and smiled proudly. “We’re going to save your hair so when you’re gone, we can clone you!” they said.
My initial anger was replaced with a real warm feeling.

The Flag
By Millie Schlick - Wallingford
It is the evening of Veteran’s Day when I am writing this. I have just taken in our country’s flag and I reflected on the following:
I live in a condo. Not one other flag flew in our courtyard of 20 homes and I did not see many in my trips around town today.
Don’t people realize how fortunate they are to live in our country where we can have freedom to voice our viewpoints even to the low side as in “slinging trash” in the event in the recent elections, to publish almost obscene “political cartoons” and make large salaries and perks for doing so? Ect., etc.
I don’t want to go back to the so called “good old days”, I really appreciate all I have. My appliances – I would not want to give up a single one. Good Roads and good cars and other means of travel mean the same to me. Scientific breakthroughs to help our problems and alleviate pain.
All I want to really say is HONOR YOUR COUNTRY, HONOR THE FLAG IT REPRESENTS and truly appreciate how blessed you and your families are to live here.


Doing “Hard Time” at the Meriden Twin Movie Theater
By Nancy Valla

It all started one Saturday afternoon when I was about 8 years old. My sister, some lively neighborhood friends, and I decided to spend that time going to the movies. The Meriden Twin Movie Theater on Broad Street was our pick for the day. That would be quite a treat because we usually went to the Loews Poli. This show was within walking distance from our house on Cook Ave. We would have to get a ride to go all the way across town to get to the Broad St. Theater. Actually, this place was unique by offering two screens in one building. In those days no other movie facility presented that outstanding feature. It was all so exciting! Who would have guessed that one day there would be places to go to that offered “12” screens. We would see the latest newsreels (not our favorite), 2 cartoons (the best), and 2 feature films. Admission was 15 cents, unless you were 12 or older, then you had to pay a whopping 25 cents. With another dime we could enjoy a bag of hot, buttery popcorn, or a large box of chewy JuJuBees which would be lodged in our teeth for a week.
Well, I honestly don’t remember what the movie was about, but I do recall that my friends and I didn’t find it particularly appealing. Soooo, we decided we would make our own fun. I got out of my seat and proceeded to run up the aisle yelling with great glee followed by my buddies in hot pursuit. Since I was leading the pack, I was the only one who was caught by a disgruntled usher. My disloyal friends who were behind me, witnessed my unlucky fate. They proceeded to disperse throughout the theater, therefore eluding the pursuing employee who immediately escorted me to the dreaded “Cry Room.” This was a place feared by all since it was the storage place for all bad little babies who managed to disturb the other patrons. Discomforted mothers were asked to vacate their seats and relocate their screaming offspring to this soundproof place. It had a huge glass window where the offending party and caretaker could continue to watch the movie in isolation without bothering others. How embarrassing, I wasn’t a baby, I was 8 years old!
As I angrily sat there alone in this huge empty room, I wondered how I ever got myself into this awful mess, and why I was the only one who had to suffer. My movie buddies were just as much at fault. After sitting for a long time consumed with feelings of resentment, I decided I would have to behave in public places. I wanted to avoid any more humiliating situations. I guess I had to learn this lesson the hard way!
My mother, the school teacher, was mortified that one of her offspring would have acted in such a disgraceful manner. I was punished by not being allowed to go to another movie for the rest of the summer ….oh the injustice of it all. Didn’t I pay for this indiscretion enough by being banished to the Cry Room. I was being chastised twice for the same crime. Isn’t there a law against this? If that wasn’t bad enough, my mom managed to remind me periodically of my lapse in good judgment. I had to suffer in silence.
For many years I was too embarrassed to return to this theater. However, when I eventually went back as an adult, I couldn’t help but wonder if every older employee who looked at me, was remembering the infamous “Cry Room Incident.” I certainly would never forget and neither would my mother.


Baseball on the Radio – Those were the days! (2003)
By Bill Mercuri
Before there were 573 channels, satellite dishes, and digital cable. Before television came to us in “living color” and yes, before television period, baseball was our national pastime, and the voices of radio brought it to life. As we enter October, the month named after Reggie Jackson, pennant races will wind down while the World Series kneels in the on-deck circle. I think back to the summer that just blew past and how I enjoyed listening to Joe Castiglione and Jerry Trupiano, my two pals who occupy the broadcast booth at Red Sox games, home and away, from April to October. Listening to them call the game gives you the feeling that you’re sitting right there in the bleachers as the action is recreated in your mind. Baseball is so much more suited for radio rather than television. Those who say that baseball is boring have most likely only experienced it on television. Even with cameras mounted on the umpire and catcher or the convenience of instant replay, baseball on television is one-dimensional, not able to capture all of the nuances that make the game what it is. To refer to the broadcasters as simply announcers is so unfair. They are storytellers. The cadence and inflection of their voice, the use of crowd noise, pausing at just the right moment to create a moment of suspense, are all props that they use to shape our imaginations. That’s the beauty of it. We have to think, imagine, daydream, in a sense. They make us “see” the third baseman “creeping in” to protect against a possible bunt; the ball sailing just over the out-stretched glove of a diving shortstop or a home run “bending” around the foul pole. This is how baseball should be experienced. In the days when radio was king, now legendary voices were as much a part of the baseball fan’s life as the players themselves. Red Barber, in Brooklyn, Jack Buck in St. Louis, Mel Allen with the Yankees, and Jack Brickhouse with the Cubs made life-long fans of an entire generation in the cities in which they practiced their trade. Roger Kahn, in his book “The Boys of Summer,” describes listening to Brooklyn Dodger games on the radio in his room as a young boy, and as the action was being described he would open his window and could hear the roar of the crowd coming from nearby Ebbets Field. He lived and died with the Dodgers, and radio was the link between him and his heroes. The portability of the radio itself allows us to take the game with us wherever we go, whatever we’re doing. On the porch, in the car, at the beach, we’re at the game. And since the game is always with us, we’re able to remember where we were when the impossible happened. In 1986 the Red Sox were on the verge of having their season end at the hands of the California Angels, down to their last strike in this playoff series. I was driving between Champaign, Illinois and Chicago with a Red Sox fan from Boston. Already resigned to defeat, we nearly drove off the road in jubilation when Dave Henderson knocked a Donnie Moore pitch over the left field wall to give the Sox new life in a game they would go on to win. Maybe listening to the game in the car is hazardous to your health! So as the play-offs and fall classic approach, why not give radio a try. Kick back, have a beer, turn off the TV, and enjoy the drama as presented by today’s artists of the airwaves.


THE THIRD KEY
By Alice Mary Scott
Don’t think that marriage is always a journey of togetherness. You know better, so when I say I started the journey of my life alone—don’t question that. I have only three keys on my key ring for all the locks in my life. Perhaps my world is oversimplified, but simplification is something I strive for and this is where I’ve arrived. My home and my car key are mandatory. In today’s world, locking both is a necessity. The third key not only complicates my life, but is the only complication therein. It unlocks my mother’s door—my childhood home until the age of 21 when I married, left home and started the journey of my life alone. Mom is also alone now, and although she’s led a full life, at 84 she’s becoming a bit confused. She’s overwhelmed easily by simple things such as receiving a stack of mail; sorting the bills from stacks of junk—too afraid to just throw the bulk of it out for fear of missing something important. Yet, I find bills that have gone unpaid for months when there’s no financial reason for it. Her paper shredder is the enemy here—one she likes to blame for the misplacement of important papers—as though it was the shredder’s fault that something has gone missing. The key to mom’s door is used frequently. At one time, I would never have entered my parents’ home without knocking or ringing the bell and waiting for an answer. I still knock or ring, but enter immediately to save my mom a painful trip to let me in. Entering has become painful for me as well as complicated. Painful because my memories were always wonderful; family, good food, holidays packed with good friends and neighbors along with my siblings and their spouses. Those memories will, unfortunately, be tempered with the present situation in the, hopefully, many more years to come. My younger sisters and I take turns popping in on mom to check that she’s still able to care for herself, help with the cleaning and laundry, even the cooking when it becomes necessary. It’s obvious the day will come when she’s going to have to face leaving her home of almost 60 years. We’re attempting to help her plan for it, knowing that the move will wrench her life from its self-imposed solitude, pleasant reminiscences and daydreams. She’s happy now, but will she be happy in whatever Assisted Living Facility we ultimately decide on? I hope and pray for her continued happiness. This key and mom’s needs complicate my life, but it’s not really a chore. She’s a wonderful person—giving and loving, intelligent and resourceful. We love her dearly, and this slow deterioration is painful to watch. I find that I’m not enjoying writing about that third key and what it symbolizes for me. Soon, I’ll have only two keys and my life will be simple again—emptier. When my childhood home is gone to someone else, a young family perhaps, it will again serve its original purpose of giving shelter to a family with children: its big yard ringing with laughter once more, its rooms filled with struggling students, wonderful aromas from the kitchen, holidays again filled with friends and family.
Oh, who am I kidding? Even though I left years ago, I knew the place would still be there. It will be almost as much of an emotional wrench for me as for my mom. One of my anchors will be gone.

MY YOUTHFUL DAYS FISHING
by Francis W. Lappert
I was 12 years old and my young brother was 10 when our father told us to catch a can of night crawlers and he would take us bullhead fishing at Meremere Reservoir. We did so, and he rigged up several tarred drop lines, as he didn’t have any fishing poles. We took off and walked to the north end of the reservoir, as this was his favorite spot to catch a mess of bullheads. We followed a path down the west side until he came to his favorite spot. Each of our lines was about 60 feet long with a two-ounce sinker on the end to help us throw it out. Our father, who was an expert with the line, caught the first fish, a nice one about 12 inches long. After dealing with several tangled lines, my brother and I got the hang of it and managed to get several fish, added to what our father caught, we quit when we had a dozen. Our mother fried them up the next day for supper. After a few more trips with him, he let us go by ourselves. At that time Meremere had a great quantity of small-mouth bass. We asked our older brother, who was an expert fisherman, what would be the best bait to catch them. He told us small green frogs or crayfish. He said the best place to catch the frogs was in the swamp for their food. The crayfish we could get in the reservoir by lifting up flat stones along the shore. We both supplied our family with many a fish dinner. I’ve got to mention the fact that the park seemed to be a breeding ground for the copperhead snakes. We killed many of them even where the swimming pool now stands. Quite a few years later, when fishing by myself on the west side of the reservoir among the huge rocks on the shore, I had a dozen small frogs in my bait pail. I had just landed a nice two-pound bass and was reaching for the pail in back of me for another frog to bait the hook. My hand froze in mid-air for there in back of the pail was a large copperhead. I reached for a nearby rock, but he saw me move, and slithered down among the rocks. Needless to say, I got away from there fast. The area between Hubbard Park and the south end of the reservoir seemed to hold most of the snakes. I have never encountered a rattlesnake in all my hiking in these woods, but my sister Rose killed a 42- inch rattler while waking in the woods near the halfway house we call Fair View. It had eight buttons. I recall in later years someone introduced large-mouth bass and also pickerel to Meremere reservoir. The fishing improved tremendously. I once caught a seven-pound twelve-ounce bass on a black jitterbug plug fishing at night. I would like to mention also that Peregrine Falcons used to nest on the crags on the west side of the reservoir and once saw one carrying a large snake in its talons back to its nest on the cliff. There also used to be the red-tail hawks that were always trying to get one of our chickens in the backyard, but our father chased them away with his 12-gauge shotgun. A final note: Meriden has five water supply reservoirs, two of them teeming with fish, Meremere and Broad Brook. It’s tragic not one of them is a not available to local fishermen.

TAKE HOLD OF EVERY MOMENT
A friend of mine opened his wife’s underwear drawer and picked up a silk paper wrapped package: “This,” he said, “isn’t any ordinary package.” He unwrapped the box and stared at both the silk paper and the box. “She got this the first time we went to New York, eight or nine years ago. She has never put it on, was saving it for a special occasion. Well, I guess this is it. He got near the bed and placed the gift box next to the other clothing he was taking to the funeral house; his wife had just died. He turned to me and said: “Never save something for a special occasion. Every day in your life is a special occasion.” I still think those words changed my life. Now I read more and clean less. I sit on the porch without worrying about anything. I spend more time with my family, and less at work. I understood that life should be a source of experiences to be lived up, not survive through. I no longer keep anything. I use crystal glasses every day. I’ll wear new clothes to go to the supermarket, if I feel like it. I don’t save my special perfume for special occasions; I use it whenever I want to. The words “Someday…” and “One Day...” are fading away from my dictionary. If it’s worth seeing, listening or doing, I want to see, listen or do it now. I don’t know what my friend’s wife would have done if she knew she wouldn’t be there the next morning. This nobody can tell. I think she might have called her relatives and closest friends. She might call old friends to make peace over past quarrels. I’d like to think she would go out for Chinese, her favorite food. It’s these small things that I would regret not doing. If I knew my time had come, I would regret it, because I would no longer see the friends I would meet, letters... letters that I wanted to write “One of these days.” I would regret and feel sad, because I didn’t say to my brothers and sons, not times enough at least, how much I love them. Now, I try not to delay, postpone or keep anything that could bring laughter and joy into our lives. And, on each morning, I say to myself that this could be a special day. Each day, each hour, each minute, is special. Stop saying “One of these days.” Remember that “One day” is far away... or might never come...

“Sheltering an Animal’s Perspective”by Gregory M. Simpson, Vice-President - Meriden Humane Society, Inc.
It’s simple really. Make a promise. Keep a promise. It’s a big responsibility but a small thing to ask in order to receive unconditional love in return. Yet animal shelter staff look daily into the faces of animals where these promises were not kept. It does not matter whether the animal is purebred or not, as an estimated 25% of dogs in animal shelters are purebred, such as the one belonging to a man who appeared at a Wal*Mart Fill-a-Truck event and asked if the shelter would take his Chihuahua for which he had reportedly spent $800. “I don’t have time for it anymore,” he offered shamelessly. We live in a throwaway society where we don’t bother to fix things anymore. We just throw them away and get new ones. Unfortunately, this is not only true for inanimate objects. A man came to the shelter asking to trade in his older cat, which was incurring veterinary bills, for a “newer model.” We had to have a conversation about the word “commitment.” Make a promise. Keep a promise. College students going on summer break, folks closing up their summer homes for the season, couples having babies, people moving, the list goes on…..all reasons some animals become homeless. It’s just easier than fulfilling the commitment that was made. Make a promise. Keep a promise. We live in a society where the Humane Society of the United States estimates that there are three to four million adoptable dogs and cats are killed each year. Again, that’s three to four million killed. Shelters that kill animals prefer the term “euthanasia.” The dictionary defines euthanasia as “the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured individuals (as persons or domestic animals) in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy.” These are not hopelessly sick or injured animals. They are three to four million adoptable animals. Kill shelters prefer that no-kill shelters call themselves “open ended” shelters rather than no-kill. Words are powerful. Do not partake in putting a spin on reality in order to salve consciences. Once I spoke to a presenter at a humane society association conference after her workshop. She defended the role of kill shelters as “necessary.” “Someone has to do it,” she said as definitively as one would say the sky is blue. “I will never accept that premise,” I responded. “It’s all a matter of priorities,” I added. We live in a country where federal taxes are allocated 28.5% to the military and 1.4% for environmental protection. We could do more for the animals if there was the public will to do so. There is a qualitative difference between “people who like animals” and “animal people.” People who like animals think it would be a nice idea to have a pet – until another idea comes along and the animal is no longer convenient. Animal people would no more give up their companion animal than they would their child. With people who like animals, it is often more about them, than it is about the animal – hence the purchase of so many purebreds. Buying animals from breeders or pet stores only perpetuates atrocities like puppy mills and condemns an equal number of shelter animals to death. In contrast, animal people want to care for those needing homes, recognizing that loving, adoptable shelter animals come in all sizes and colors. People who like animals spend their weekends bringing their purebreds to dog and cat shows to win ribbons. Animal people spend their free time volunteering at animal shelters to help dogs and cats that are not their own. People who like animals think it would be a nice idea to have a pet – until it costs them money. Animal people find a way to care for their companion animal, no matter how meager their means. In New Haven I often see two homeless men pushing shopping carts full of empty soda cans. Each has a dog with him. One can tell by observing that the dog means the world to him. One even had cut out a shirt for his dog to wear. These men are animal people. It is not about money. It is about commitment. Make a promise. Keep a promise. Your companion animal would do no less for you.For the animals,Gregory M. Simpson, Vice-President - MERIDEN HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.
Gregory Simpson is Vice-President of the Meriden Humane Society, a no-kill shelter, and member of the Cat Writers’ Association. Formerly a state advisor to Friends of Animals, he was also named one of the 40 Ultimate Cat Lovers by CAT FANCY magazine.

RAINY DAY FUN WITH THE KIDS
By Joan GoodmanMeriden
As the weather forecaster announces the next rainstorm, the panic starts to build inside every parent. Their brain screams – what am I going to do with the kid(s)?!!! With a little creativity and a spirit of fun, both parents and kids can survive the weather, and even have a good time!
Fun At Home
For fun at home, there are numerous craft ideas and games to fit a range of ages and budgets. And you don’t need to be Martha Stewart. Your local library, the Meriden Family Resource Center, bookstores, and the Internet are all helpful sources. Here are some examples: Play Clay - Make homemade play dough and use cookie cutters to form it into animals or whatever your budding artist desires. The recipe is as follows: 2 cups of flour, 1 cup of salt, 2 cups of water (add whatever color of food coloring that you want), 2 tbsp. cream of tartar, 2 tbsp. oil. Stir ingredients together in a pot. Cook until mixture is dry and gummy. Knead until soft. Trash to treasures - These are ideas for using the things you would normally throw away every day, from making a turkey centerpiece out of a paper bag to dolls out of plastic bottles. This is from the web site http://craftsforkids.about.com that has craft ideas for free. It is well organized and sorted by subject, e.g., animals-creatures, musical crafts, holidays, multicultural, school days, etc. Construction site - Make a construction site in your house for kids who love digging and trucks. Take a cardboard box; seal the sides and bottom well with tape. Leave the top open. Pour in Grapenuts or the cereal of your choice, add some trucks, and you have entertainment (and maybe a snack!) Simon Says – This classic game can be played anywhere. The leader gives commands to the players, who must follow every command, except those not preceded by “Simon Says.”.. Anyone who follows a command that does not have “Simon Says” in front of it is out of the game. Statues –Turn some music on. Everyone dances or moves however they please. Turn the music off quickly. Everyone freezes while you count to five, then turn the music on again. Anyone who moves during the counting is out. A great group game. Invite the neighbors! Getting out of the house –adventures in Connecticut. If you or your children are “crawling up the walls,” go out and explore Connecticut’s many attractions.
Some options in the local area include: Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale (203-432-5050) Yale University Art Gallery (203-432-0600) Connecticut Children’s Museum (203-562-5437) Eli Whitney Museum (203-777-1833) Barker Character, Comic, and Cartoon Museum (800-995-2357) Kidcity Children’s Museum (860-343-0824)
A great resource for day trip ideas is Fun with the Family in Connecticut by Doe Boyle. Also, check the calendar section of your local newspaper and listings at the library. Local libraries may have discount passes to certain attractions. So next time the weather forecast calls for rain, relax, and have fun with the kids!
The Peoples' Press LOVES Diane Smith
Diane is the co-host of the top rated Morning Show on WTIC-AM News Talk 1080 with Ray Dunaway. An Emmy award winning TV journalist, Diane produces programs for Connecticut Public TV, based on her very popular series "Positively Connecticut." "Positively Connecticut" searches out the inspiring, warm, funny, and sometimes downright strange stories that give Connecticut its character. Her book by the same name has been a bestseller for The Globe Pequot Press. The sequel, Absolutely Positively Connecticut, was published in 2000. After 9/11 one reviewer called her book Christmas in Connecticut “the comfort gift of the year.” Diane's latest book Summer in Connecticut is a celebration of the season. For more than 16 years Diane was a news anchor and reporter at WTNH TV in New Haven, where her reporting earned her an Emmy award. Diane's documentaries have earned numerous state and national awards. The American Cancer Society has honored her for her work in educating women about breast cancer. The Connecticut Press Club honored her with its Mark Twain Distinguished Journalist of the Year award. Toastmasters International honored Diane with their Communication and Leadership Award. Diane is active in promoting Connecticut business and tourism. She was awarded the Connecticut Tourism Industry's Media Award for Positively Connecticut. For “showing Connecticut to the rest of the world in a positive light,” Diane was named Person of the Year by the Homebuilders Association of New Haven. Diane serves on the board of directors of the IMPAC-CT State University Award for Young Writers, and for the fifth year is the honorary chairperson of "The World of Words" programs held in libraries across the state and sponsored by the Connecticut Center for the Book. Diane served three terms on the board of directors of the Women's Campaign School at Yale University, a non-partisan organization dedicated to helping women attain public office. As a spokesperson for Easter Seals, Diane helped raise over eight million dollars for programs that help people with disabilities live independently. Diane graduated with honors from the State University of New York at Binghamton. She lives on the Connecticut shoreline and in West Hartford with her husband, Tom Woodruff, an economist. For more information see Diane's web site at www.positivelyct.com
Upcoming Shows:
Sunday, October 29th at 6:00 p.m.Monday, October 30th at 11:00 p.m.
CPTV Premieres a New Episode of Positively Connecticut Join award-winning broadcast journalist Diane Smith for an array of invigorating autumn adventures around the state when an all-new episode of Positively Connecticut premieres on Connecticut Public Television. Positively Connecticut is made possible through leadership funding from People's Bank. Additional funding comes from Comcast and the Connecticut Commission on Culture & Tourism. This edition of Positively Connecticut features: Dogged Determination (Bloomfield and Andover, Conn.) - Just as the new Lassie movie hits theaters, Diane finds some amazing collies in real life. A mere 10 miles from downtown Hartford, border collies are herding sheep, a pastime from long ago and far away. The Bloomfield Sheepdog Trial has become the toughest contest east of the Mississippi for dogs and their handlers - thanks to Beverly Lambert, one of the sport's top competitors, known by most people in town as the director of the Bloomfield Library. Out in the field, the dogs and their people are "reading" the sheep. The action is intense as the dogs work a flock through a grueling half-mile course. Connecticut's Unsolved Mysteries (Storrs, Windsor Locks, East Haddam, Griswold, Fairfield, West Haven, Conn.) - Solving history's mysteries is his favorite part of the job. Nick Bellantoni, Connecticut's official state archaeologist, is a little bit Indiana Jones and a little bit CSI. In this episode of Positively Connecticut, Diane joins Bellantoni as he uncovers details of the plane crash that gave Bradley International Airport its name. They search for more clues about the life of Venture Smith, a slave who became a free man, a Connecticut landowner and legend. In the middle of the city of West Haven, they find the home of Native Americans who lived there more than 5,000 years ago, and discover evidence of vampires in eastern Connecticut. That's Edu-tainment (Milford, Conn.) - When a school evaluation showed tardiness was a problem at Platt Technical High School in Milford, teachers came up with an answer that's become “must see TV.” Mild-mannered social studies teacher Pat Burke transforms himself into a superhero, a beach bum, an astronaut, a nutty professor or a time traveler when he takes to the airwaves every school day at 7:40 a.m. With the help of students in the school's television production classes, Burke offers both an entertaining alternative to snoozing through homeroom and a way to boost school spirit. Talking Music (New Haven, Conn.) - From the people who shaped the musical life of the 20th century, come their thoughts, in their own words, and in their own voices. Aaron Copland explains the unlikely naming of one of the best-known pieces of modern classical music, "Appalachian Spring." Eubie Blake describes the birth of ragtime. Duke Ellington talks jazz. They told it all to Vivian Perlis, who preserved it for posterity in a priceless collection of oral and video memoirs. The Oral History of American Music (OHAM) project continues to explore the minds of modern music masters. Delve into the archives with Diane at Yale University, and meet the woman who pioneered the practice of recording "oral history." Everything Old Is Old Again (Old Lyme, Conn.) - A century ago, Florence Griswold's boarding house in Old Lyme was home base for an American Impressionist artists' colony. Later, the Georgian-style mansion became a museum, and now, thanks to a careful restoration, it reverberates again with the life it had in 1910. Through an armchair tour of the Florence Griswold Museum, Positively Connecticut viewers will experience a snippet of a unique era in American art history - and feel the vitality of the artists who lived a bohemian life of camaraderie and creativity.

YOUR December News, Events and more!

SCUBA SANTA is coming back to the Wallingford YMCA!

SCUBA Santa will arrive at the Wallingford Family YMCA on Sunday December 10th for an afternoon of fun in the pool.
Santa will be all decked out in his usual red outfit with the addition of mask, fins, and SCUBA tank. Santa’s helper will also be in SCUBA gear. Santa will have decorations for kids to hang on the underwater Christmas tree. Underwater pictures with Santa will be taken. Parents were encouraged to join in and help their child swim around the tree. Along with fun in the pool, there will be healthy snacks and a Christmas craft activity. Family Day is Sunday, Dec. 10th from 1-4PM: Santa will arrive at 2PM.


WALLINGFORD FAMILY YMCA

AMERICAN RED CROSS
LIFEGUARD TRAINING COURSE-
INCLUDES FIRST AID, CPR/FPR + AED.

Pre-test date- December 15, 6:30PM – be prepared to swim
Class dates- Saturday, Dec. 16 9AM-5PM
Saturday, Dec. 23 9AM-5PM
* Friday, Dec. 22 only if needed

Fee: Wallingford YMCA members: $230
Program Members: $250

Fee includes textbook, pocket mask, and certification cards

Call 203 269 4497 x 20 for more information or to register.


“Sheltering an Animal’s Perspective”
by
Gregory M. Simpson, Vice-President
Meriden Humane Society, Inc.


It’s simple really. Make a promise. Keep a promise. It’s a big responsibility but a small thing to ask in order to receive unconditional love in return. Yet animal shelter staff look daily into the faces of animals where these promises were not kept. It does not matter whether the animal is purebred or not, as an estimated 25% of dogs in animal shelters are purebred, such as the one belonging to a man who appeared at a Wal*Mart Fill-a-Truck event and asked if the shelter would take his Chihuahua for which he had reportedly spent $800. “I don’t have time for it anymore,” he offered shamelessly.

We live in a throwaway society where we don’t bother to fix things anymore. We just throw them away and get new ones. Unfortunately, this is not only true for inanimate objects. A man came to the shelter asking to trade in his older cat, which was incurring veterinary bills, for a “newer model.” We had to have a conversation about the word “commitment.” Make a promise. Keep a promise.

College students going on summer break, folks closing up their summer homes for the season, couples having babies, people moving, the list goes on…..all reasons some animals become homeless. It’s just easier than fulfilling the commitment that was made. Make a promise. Keep a promise.

We live in a society where the Humane Society of the United States estimates that there are three to four million adoptable dogs and cats are killed each year. Again, that’s three to four million killed. Shelters that kill animals prefer the term “euthanasia.” The dictionary defines euthanasia as “the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured individuals (as persons or domestic animals) in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy.” These are not hopelessly sick or injured animals. They are three to four million adoptable animals.

Kill shelters prefer that no-kill shelters call themselves “open ended” shelters rather than no-kill. Words are powerful. Do not partake in putting a spin on reality in order to salve consciences. Once I spoke to a presenter at a humane society association conference after her workshop. She defended the role of kill shelters as “necessary.” “Someone has to do it,” she said as definitively as one would say the sky is blue. “I will never accept that premise,” I responded. “It’s all a matter of priorities,” I added. We live in a country where federal taxes are allocated 28.5% to the military and 1.4% for environmental protection. We could do more for the animals if there was the public will to do so.

There is a qualitative difference between “people who like animals” and “animal people.” People who like animals think it would be a nice idea to have a pet – until another idea comes along and the animal is no longer convenient. Animal people would no more give up their companion animal than they would their child.

With people who like animals, it is often more about them, than it is about the animal – hence the purchase of so many purebreds. Buying animals from breeders or pet stores only perpetuates atrocities like puppy mills and condemns an equal number of shelter animals to death. In contrast, animal people want to care for those needing homes, recognizing that loving, adoptable shelter animals come in all sizes and colors.

People who like animals spend their weekends bringing their purebreds to dog and cat shows to win ribbons. Animal people spend their free time volunteering at animal shelters to help dogs and cats that are not their own.

People who like animals think it would be a nice idea to have a pet – until it costs them money. Animal people find a way to care for their companion animal, no matter how meager their means. In New Haven I often see two homeless men pushing shopping carts full of empty soda cans. Each has a dog with him. One can tell by observing that the dog means the world to him. One even had cut out a shirt for his dog to wear. These men are animal people. It is not about money. It is about commitment.

Make a promise. Keep a promise. Your companion animal would do no less for you.

For the animals,

Gregory M. Simpson, Vice-President
MERIDEN HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.


Gregory Simpson is Vice-President of the Meriden Humane Society, a no-kill shelter, and member of the Cat Writers’ Association. Formerly a state advisor to Friends of Animals, he was also named one of the 40 Ultimate Cat Lovers by CAT FANCY magazine.



JUMP RIGHT IN!
AMERICAN RED CROSS
GUARD START- LIFEGUARDING TOMORROW
FOR 6TH-9TH GRADERS is coming to the Wallingford Family YMCA.

This is a program designed to guide youth interested in lifeguarding by building a foundation of knowledge, attitudes, and skills for future lifeguards. This foundation consists of 5 categories: Prevention, Fitness, Response, Leadership, and Professionalism. This program does not certify participants as lifeguards. It is an effective transition from upper-level swim lessons, as well as swim team, to the American Red Cross Lifeguarding program when 15 years of age.
Participants must be at the Minnow level of swim lessons or above.
HOLIDAY CLASS T-W-TH-F DEC. 26-29
3-4:30PM
SESSION 1 CLASS: BEGINS JAN. 8, 2007
MONDAYS 3:30-4:45PM

MEMBERS: $75 Includes participant workbook and shirt!
PROGRAM MEMBERS: $100



www.wallingfordymca.org 203 269 4497



Calendar of Events--Jitter¹s Coffeehouse1273 Queen Street Southington, CT 06489 (860) 747-1100 Dec 7--Thu.-- Drumming Circle--7pm-10pm -Dec 8 --Fri.--Lis FaustDec 9--Sat.--Andrea Paquin--alternative Folk/Country musicDec 14--Thu.-- Drumming Circle--7pm-10pm -Dec 15--Fri.--Comedy hosted by Chris Johnston with 6 comedians and livemusicChris Johnston is a Comedian/Writer from New Jersey! He started his comedy journey at open mics in 1999. Since then he has entertained audiences with his unique observations of everyday life. Chris takes life a little less seriously than most by poking fun at what seems to be the actions, thoughts, and embarrassing moments that we all share. He travels and performs as a Host, Feature, or Headliner Comic at clubs, colleges and events along the east coast.

GREATER MERIDEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE News and EventsBUSINESS BEFORE HOURS HOSTED BY CAFÉ DOLCEThe Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce presents a Business BEFORE Hours hosted by Café Dolce. The event will be held on Friday, December 15, 2006 from 8-9:30 a.m. at 33 West Main Street, Meriden. The cafe is located in the heart of downtown Meriden and offers a morning and afternoon menu which includes a variety of specialty pastries, soups, salads, wraps and sandwiches - not to mention a wide variety of specialty coffees! Be sure to bring plenty of business cards to promote and make new contacts for your business! Refreshments and door prizes will be provided.Business Before Hours events are co-sponsored by the Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce along with member companies to provide professional and social opportunities for members and members-to be. HISPANIC MEMBER OUTREACH COMMITTEE HOLIDAY FRIEND /
FUNDRAISERThe Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce is pleased to invite the entirecommunity to the Chamber's Hispanic Member Outreach Committee's (HMOC)Annual Friend/Fundraiser! The HMOC was created in October 2005 and the objectives of the committee are: Encourage participation in the Chamber; Encourage participation in the Community; Raise funds for annual Educational Award; Grow leadership from the Hispanic Community; Improve business connections; Promote Hispanic Heritage Month activities; Participate in Meriden's Bicentennial; Share success stories of committee members; Encourage and mentor the youth by providing excellent Hispanic role models; Have some fun. The event is open to the public with a monetary donation of choice for admission that includes an array of hot and cold hors d'oeuvres, networking and entertainment, sponsored by Hott Traxx. In addition there will be a Basket Raffle, and a cash bar will be available. Funds raised at this event will go toward education awards for MeridenHispanic students. The event will be held on Tuesday, December 19th from 5:30- 7:30 p.m. Club Impulz on Colony Street in Meriden. GREATER MERIDEN CHAMBER PRESENTS MERIDEN NIGHT WITH THE BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERSThe Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce is pleased to invite the entire community to Meriden Night at the Bridgeport Sound Tigers for a game againstthe Hartford Wolf Pack! The event is open to the public with a special ticket price of $20 per person that includes: Meet and Greet session 1 hour before game, exclusively on the 3rd floor "Tiger's Den" club lounge (Arena Doors Open at 6:30pm); Fully catered event with cash bar PRE-GAME ONLY (6:30pm-7:30pm); Chamber will be greeted over the P.A. system and on digital display boards;All Meriden attendees will be seated together; Attendees are invited to our complimentary post game autograph session. The event will be held on Friday, December 29th at 600 Main St - Bridgeport, Ct 06604. Join us for a unique event - fun for the entire family! Please RSVP by Thursday, December 28th to Anthony Mercogliano, Bridgeport Sound Tigers (203.3344625, ext. 302) or email Anthony@soundtigers.com. This offer is valid for pre-sale only and is not available at the box office.
For more information or to register for nay of these events call the Chamber at 203.235.7901 The Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce is an independent, non-profit membership organization whose mission is to encourage and promote the advancement of commercial, industrial and community interests of the Greater Meriden area. Over 650 members strong, we encourage all businesses who would like exposure and promotion in the Greater Meriden area to join us!

Give the gift of PRESENCE
Bring joy to someone's life this holiday season and beyond. The greatest gift you can give is the gift of presence. Being a volunteer means becoming a member of a caring and compassionate hospice team. Hospice is about living every day to its fullest...it's all about quality not quantity of life. There are many volunteer opportunities available.... companionship, respite for weary caregivers, visiting patients with your pet, sharing your musical or artistic talents, or helping in the office. You choose what's best for you! Training to become a hospice volunteer with Connecticut VNA's hospice will be starting soon in our Wallingford office. We offer a Medicare approved volunteer training as well as continuing education and support. Make it your new year's resolution to begin the hospice volunteer journey today - call Jolan Szollosi, Volunteer Coordinator at 203-679-5342.

Jennifer’s House of Hair Benefit for New Opportunities
Jennifer's House of Hair, 437 Broad Street, Meriden is hosting our 1st Annual Open House to Benefit New Opportunites of Greater Meriden Food Pantry on Thursday, December 21 from 9am until 8pm. With the donation of either a non-perishable food item or $2.00, new clients will receive a free Redken color gloss with a blow-dry. Our existing clients will receive a choice between a conditioning treatment w/blow-dry, ahand massage w/paraffin dip or a mini facial. We will be having Door Prizes wtih Hourly Drawings, 10% off Gift Certificates and Retail products. Snacks, goodies and drinks will be provided throughout the day. Hope to see you there! 203-235-3166 First come first serve. Appointments recommended but not needed.

Looking for moms to join a new local mom's group. It's my pleasure to establish a new group called Mothers and Children or MAC for short. It is my intention is to design this group with mothers wants and needs in mind. Where as moms (or dad's too) we can get together and discuss topics that are important to us and our children. To incorporate time to regenerate us as well as the kids. Although we will have playgroups, activities and outings for children. I hope to initiate things like Mom's Night Out, Babysitting Co-Ops, Family Days, Crafts Clubs or anything else that our other mom's might like. If you are interested please go t0 mothersandchildrengroup.com or email me at jfoley@mothersandchildrengroup.com



Wallingford YMCA News and Events
AMERICAN RED CROSS LIFEGUARD TRAINING COURSE- INCLUDES FIRST AID, CPR/FPR + AED.
Pre-test date- December 15, 6:30PM – be prepared to swim
Class dates- Saturday, Dec. 16 9AM-5PM Saturday, Dec. 23 9AM-5PM * Friday, Dec. 22 only if needed
Fee: Wallingford YMCA members: $230 Program Members: $250
Fee includes textbook, pocket mask, and certification cards
Call 203 269 4497 x 20 for more information or to register.
JUMP RIGHT IN! AMERICAN RED CROSS GUARD START- LIFEGUARDING TOMORROW
FOR 6TH-9TH GRADERS is coming to the Wallingford Family YMCA.
This is a program designed to guide youth interested in lifeguarding by building a foundation of knowledge, attitudes, and skills for future lifeguards. This foundation consists of 5 categories: Prevention, Fitness, Response, Leadership, and Professionalism. This program does not certify participants as lifeguards. It is an effective transition from upper-level swim lessons, as well as swim team, to the American Red Cross Lifeguarding program when 15 years of age.
Participants must be at the Minnow level of swim lessons or above.
HOLIDAY CLASS T-W-TH-F DEC. 26-29 3-4:30PM
SESSION 1 CLASS: BEGINS JAN. 8, 2007 MONDAYS 3:30-4:45PM
MEMBERS: $75 Includes participant workbook and shirt!
PROGRAM MEMBERS: $100
www.wallingfordymca.org 203 269 4497
SCUBA SANTA is coming back to the Wallingford YMCA!
SCUBA Santa will arrive at the Wallingford Family YMCA on Sunday December 10th for an afternoon of fun in the pool.
Santa will be all decked out in his usual red outfit with the addition of mask, fins, and SCUBA tank. Santa’s helper will also be in SCUBA gear. Santa will have decorations for kids to hang on the underwater Christmas tree. Underwater pictures with Santa will be taken. Parents were encouraged to join in and help their child swim around the tree. Along with fun in the pool, there will be healthy snacks and a Christmas craft activity. Family Day is Sunday, Dec. 10th from 1-4PM: Santa will arrive at 2PM.

The Holiday for Giving program Giving Trees
The Holiday for Giving program Giving Trees are located at the following businesses: Academy DiCapelli, Adamo’s Garage, Amy’s Artistry, Anthony & Associates, Bre-elle Salon, Calatayud Chiropractic Center, Curves for Women, Davis & Mascola, CPA, Faulkner Physical Therapy Group, First CT Credit Union, M Salon & Spa, Wallingford Park & Rec Department, Renee’s School of Dance, SAFT Auto Center, Simply Special Gift Shop, TD Banknorth – all branches, The Book Vault, and Unique Fitness. New unwrapped toys can be dropped off at any of the locations above. Also, new unwrapped toys can be delivered to the Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department during their Fill a Fire Truck with Toys Campaign on Friday, Dec. 1st through Sunday Dec. 3rd. All toys will be given to those children in need in the Wallingford Community. For more information please call 269-9542.

The Holiday for Giving program is in full swing.
Our elves our ready to assist those in the Wallingford Community who need a little extra help to make their holiday a special one. The Holiday for Giving program is a community organization run by volunteers; it functions solely on your donations. All donations are given directly back to those in the Wallingford Community.
What do we do? We spread magic by providing over 550 children with 3 new toys and a book to read. We provide each family with a box of food and a gift certificate to a local grocery store.
How can you help us create some magic? You can donate food items, new toys, books, personal hygiene items or money.
Our hours of operation: Mon. Dec. 4th – Thurs. Dec. 7th – 9:00 – 3:00; Friday, Dec. 8th – 9 – 7:30; Saturday, Dec. 9th – 9:00 – 3:00; Monday, Dec. 11th - 9:00 – 6:00.
Donations can be dropped at the Wallingford Grange, 586 Center St., Wallingford during the above hours. Monetary donations are greatly appreciated and can be dropped off during the above hours or mailed to: Holiday for Giving, P.O. Box 1612, Wlfd, CT 06492.
For more information on ways to help or to refer those who need help during the holidays please call 294-2175.
We thank you in advance for your continued support and for helping parents put food on their table and smiles on the faces of their children.



HOLIDAY COLLECTIONS FOR CHARITIESLocal sports store and coffeehouse has an thirteenth annual holiday collections for 3 local charities, (Plainville Food Pantry, Prudence Crandall & Friendship Center). PASS-IT-ON- Sports and Jitter¹s Coffeehouse will accept donations thru December 20 for the charities during store and coffeehouse hours. Donations will be accepted for Prudence Crandall Shelter, The Friendship Center in New Britain and the Plainville Food Pantry. Items needed include non-perishable foods, toiletries, cleaning products, paper goods, baby foods, diapers, clean bedding, small & large furniture, and small working appliances. Advance notice requested for larger donations.PASS-IT-ON SPORTS & Jitter¹s Coffeehouse 1273 QUEEN STREET (RT10) SOUTHINGTON / PLAINVILLE LINEBariatric (Surgical Weight Loss) Program SeminarThis seminar is an opportunity for individuals considering bariatric surgery to meet with our Bariatric Team and learn more about the option of weight loss surgery. We'll talk about how our surgery is Laparoscopic as well as our surgeons who only perform open procedures.Presenter: Aziz Benbrahim, MDTuesday, December 12, 2006 6:30 - 8:00pmMidState Medical Center 2nd Floor, Board Room
There is No cost for this program and the contact is 203-694-8343

Meriden Youths Take Center Stage
Three young people from Meriden will take center stage at the Hartford Civic Center on December 9 as the Greater Hartford Arts Council presents the 27th annual United Technologies Symphony on Ice®. Alyson Miksitz, age 18; Kieu-my Kim Nguyen, age 9; and Kori Sheades, age 12, will perform as members of “The Symphony Skaters,” who are annual favorites at the event.
Along with The Symphony Skaters, the Symphony on Ice skating and music spectacular features the Hartford Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Edward Cumming, the Symphony Youth Choir, Spectrum in Motion Dance Theatre Ensemble and special guests Jennifer Wester and Daniil Barantsev, 2005 Midwestern Champions.
A capacity crowd of 14,000 people is expected to attend the event, which is the largest single-day toy-raiser in Connecticut, and one of the largest in the country. Admission to Symphony on Ice is a free ticket and a new, unwrapped toy for the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s Toys for Tots program.
The Symphony Skaters are from “Group with No Name,” a Connecticut-based theater club that has as its mission “making the world brighter with charity performances.” The group has skated at Symphony on Ice each year since 1980. This year’s group of 74 skaters come from 32 area towns and range in age from 3 to 35, with the average age being 14.
The Meriden youths will perform to live music played by the Hartford Symphony Orchestra in such numbers as “Ruldoph the Red-nosed Reindeer” by Johnny Marks and Victor Herbert’s “March of the Toys.”
“Group with No Name” has a long history of performing in high-visibility charitable events, including those at New York City’s Rockefeller Center, the Mohegan Sun Arena and the International Skating Center of Connecticut. They have helped to raise money for Special Olympics and Easter Seals, as well as hundreds of thousands of toys for Toys for Tots. In fact, in addition to performing at Symphony on Ice, each of the skaters also donates a toy for the event.
All of the students in the group are devoted not just to skating and charitable work, but to academics as well. Despite a demanding rehearsal schedule, most of the students are on the honor roll in their schools. Some go on to compete at regional and even national skating competitions.
The Symphony Skaters and Group with No Name are directed by Susan Mastroni Dee, with assistance from Sandra Miksitz.
The event is the largest single-day toy-raiser in Connecticut, and one of the largest in the country. Symphony on Ice will be held at the Hartford Civic Center on Saturday, December 9, at noon.
More than 15,000 toys are collected through the event each year. The toys are distributed to underprivileged children throughout the Greater Hartford region by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve.
Information about the show and ticket availability may be found on the Greater Hartford Arts Council web site, www.ConnectTheDots.org.
The Greater Hartford Arts Council presents the event, which has been sponsored each year by United Technologies. Additional support is provided this year by Prudential Financial. Media sponsors are Hartford Advocate, The River 105.9 FM, Country 92.5 FM, Power 104.1 FM and Kidtivity.com.
The Greater Hartford Arts Council enlivens the spirit and economy of Connecticut’s Capital Region by planning, promoting and raising funds for cultural programs that are building one of our nation’s most vibrant communities. It is the largest independent arts council in New England, runs the 9th largest United Arts fund in the country and is a national leader in diversified services and cultural promotions. The Greater Hartford Arts Council has raised and invested nearly $46 million for the arts over 35 years, helping to rank Greater Hartford in the top 6 percent of metropolitan areas in North America for its arts and culture. More information about the Greater Hartford Arts Council may be found at www.ConnectTheDots.org.


CT Pink Panther’s Tryouts
The CT Pink Panthers Girl's Travel Softball organization has grown to 6 teams for the 2007 season: 12u, two 14u, 16u and two18u teams and we are looking for a few solid players to complete some of our teams. This is a great opportunity for your daughter to join an organization that stresses development for the 12u & 14u teams. The girls in the younger divisions learned quite a bit: developed friendships, had a lot of fun and competed with the best teams in New England. College Showcases & preparation for college was stressed for the 16u & 18u levels that enhances their chances for colleges and obtain scholarships. The organization organizes 2 College Showcases and runs 3 tournaments throughout the year. Come be a part of an organization that is the home of the 16u 2005 ASA State Champions. For a tryout or more information about the organization, contact us by calling Bryan Pereyo at 860-306-2647 or e-mail him at bryan@ace-recruiting.com. You can also get information by going to our website at http://eteamzactive.com/ctpinkpanthers/

“Christmas Community Dinner: GENEROSITY Makes It Happen”
Turkey and all the trimmings will be enjoyed be everyone at the 26th annual holiday Christmas dinner, noon to 2:00 PM Christmas Day at the First Congregational Church, 23 South Main St., Wallingford. The dinner, sponsored by Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. and the church, is free and open to all who want to spend the day with others. Transportation will be provided to those needing rides. Meals and visits will also be delivered to the homebound. Food baskets are sent out ahead of time.
These dinners happen every Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter and are fully dependent on donations of food, time and money to be successful. In addition to the dinner at the church, baskets will be sent out ahead of time to families in Wallingford, Meriden and Cheshire. Meals and visits are also delivered to the homebound who are unable to participate in the dinners at the church.
At Christmas, we “adopt” children and adults with AIDS, some folks who are differently abled, those who are alone, nursing home residents without family and other entire families as we learn of their particular circumstances. We provide them with food, clothes and gifts. We write cards and send letters to cheer people. It is incredible to be part of this effort and to see all the good that comes when people give and share. This year we will be collecting donations for a group of Wallingford school teachers and students who will be making a trip to New Orleans to help rebuild homes for the Hurricane Katrina families who lost everything.
As this effort has become so large, it is necessary for us to collect food and other items as early as possible. We are in need of everything! Individuals and businesses that would like to volunteer their time, talents, food, gifts, money or services are encouraged to call Nancy Freyberg at Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc., 284-8299. Together we make it better for everyone!


Audubon Christmas Counts
Quinnipiac Valley Audubon Society, the local chapter of the National Audubon Society, needs birders to cover different pieces of our Christmas Count circle, checking fields, wooded areas, ponds, marshes, swamps, parks, cemeteries, rivers, thickets and backyards for birds. The center of the QVAS count is the intersection of Route 68 and Route 157 in Durham. The circle extends out 7.5 miles in all directions. Territory within our circle includes Meriden, Wallingford, Middlefield, Durham, Guilford, and Northford. This year the CBC will take place on Sunday, December 17. This is a fun, important annual survey, with time in the field that brings together birders of all abilities.
History
On Christmas Day 1900, the group initiated an alternative to the traditional holiday 'side hunt,' in which teams competed to see who could shoot the most birds. Instead of hunting, the group counted the birds they saw, thus founding one of the most significant citizen-based conservation efforts and a century-old institution.
Today, almost 55,000 volunteers from all 50 states, every Canadian province, parts of Central and South America, Bermuda, the West Indies, and Pacific islands will count and record every individual bird and bird species seen during one 24-hour calendar day. About 1,800 individual counts will be held during a two-and-a-half week period.
Purpose
Apart from its attraction as a social, sporting, and competitive event, CBC reveals scientific information on the winter distributions of various bird species as well as the over-all health of the environment. CBC is the longest running ornithological database and continues to grow in importance as a monitor of the status of resident and migratory birds across the western hemisphere. The data, 100% volunteer generated, has become a crucial part of the U. S. Government's natural history monitoring database.
There is a $5 donation for each field participant to cover the cost of generating materials for compilers, producing an annual CBC summary issue, and maintaining the CBC website and database. Feeder watchers are also needed to tally the birds and are not required to make a donation.
Please consider joining us this year. Remember it is not necessary to spend the entire day. Please call Loretta Victor at 203 634-1911 if you have questions or would like to participate.


2006 3RD ANNUAL CRAIG CLARK MEMORIAL SCRAMBLE
Dear Wendy & Peter,
Under sparkling skies, with the blessing of beautiful autumn colors, the 3rd Annual Craig Clark Memorial Scramble was played, Saturday, October 7th, 2006. Once again, we extend our most grateful and sincere thanks to all of you, the participants, sponsors and volunteers that contributed to the success of this event in memory of our son, Craig, thank you so very much! Proceeds will go to:
A scholarship to benefit a graduating son/daughter of a Meriden city employee for higher education
The American Heart Association
Through your help and support, Craig continues to lend a hand to others in his name. We are so grateful to all of you for that.
Most sincerely, The Clark Family
PLAYERS:
{Joe Stone-Dave Cusano-Luke Leone-Jeff Ohr} Jon Patrucco- Jim Arseniadis-Michael O’Brien-Jeff Hamilton} Dick Poirier-Brian Poirier Craig Dedman-Walter Sadowski} Rob Munson-Lucas Munson-Brendon Sarpu Tony Giacco} Eli Titley-Paul Ruzycki-Danielle Flagg-Bob Berkmoes}
{Michael Dutko-Bill King-Jim Merritt-Aldo Merritt} David Driver-Kathy Driver-Bruce Miller} David Perry-Carmen Perry Cristian Perry-John Marquardt} Roger Clark-Bill Mercuri-Ray Rivera-Peter Clark}Paul Clark-Myrta Clark Jeff Clark-Patti Clark}
SPONSORS
:Meriden Municipal Employees Union Local 740/City of Meriden Highway, Garage & Traffic/Continuing Education/Norma &Dick MacGann/Dan & Cheryl Tomassetti/Dr. Loyd Davis, DDS/Leslie Kogut/John & Terese Escoto Bill & Susan Piper/Luby Olson/Law Offices of Jon Patrucco/Jose & Ione Hernandez/Woody & Anne Morenz/Martin & Jeanne Moore/LouiseCuccaro Mark & Diane Aldrich/John & Joan Simones/Ron & Kathy Ceruti/ Lisa Hoover Checkered Flag/Insurance Center Of Central Ct./ Karen & Guy Pattavina City Of Meriden Senior Affairs/Meriden YMCA AOA/Dorrine Nothnagel
Tim Gaffney/Laura Aresco/MaryJo Di Pasquale/Lisa Drazen/Jim Ieronimo Marci Good/Lora Clark/Dr. Benjamin Kahn/Margaret Carter/Deborah&Craig Gallick/Joan Duquette-Aresco/Town & Country Spirit Shoppe/John & Carrie Marquardt/RoseAnn Lake/Lenny Knecht/Dave Katz/Phyllis Drescher/Jay &
Penny Hall/JMC Construction LLC
GIFTS:
Bill Mercuri/Wendy & Peter Daniels/Leslie K. LLC/John Banks/ Kathy Mroszka Carrie Marquardt/Kathy Driver/Joe Stone/Tony & Lou Destefano/Dr. Mark Burwick, DDS/Indian Springs Golf Course/ Mt. Snow Golf Course/ American Heart Association
DINNER ONLY: Keith Graham/Jackie Jennett & Guest
VOLUNTEERS: Ramon Rivera/Lisa Hoover/Carrie Marquardt/Theresa Needels

“There is a destiny that makes us brothers
No one goes that way alone
ll that we bring into the lives of others
Comes back into our own”



Al-Anon News Story Alcoholism, The Storm Within a Family. Alcoholism in a family is like a tornado. It can leave a life in ruins. For 55 years, Al-Anon family groups, which include Alateen for younger members, have helped to restore and enhance the strengths of people who have been swept into the storm of alcoholism. Many members share that the foundation for this restoration begins in the rooms of Al-Anon and Alateen meetings when they hear the three C¹s...you didn¹t cause it, you can¹t control it and you can¹t cure it. Simple sharing such as this can often introduce a window of opportunity for new thinking. A common bond and commitment to shared values are the Al-Anon building blocks for changed attitudes and personal renewal. Members practice anonymity at the level of press, radio, TV and film as an example of their support to the newcomer, who may be anxious about the lingering stigma associated with the disease of alcoholism. The holiday¹s are a particularly difficult times for family members of those who drink. Meetings are held weekly, year round, including major holidays. For further information, or to find out where meetings are held, call 1-888-8AL-ANON or contact the Connecticut Web site at www.ct-al-anon.org. Does someone¹s drinking bother you? There is help for you. Meetings held in most towns weekly, daytime and evenings. Al-Anon Meeting: For anyone affected by someone else¹s drinking.www.ct-al-anon.org 1-888-8AL-ANON (825-2666).





Meriden YMCA News and Events
MERIDEN YMCA BEGINS REGISTRATION FOR LIFEGUARD COURSE
The Meriden YMCA is conducting registration for the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training Course. Participants are required to attend the following 9 Classes: Saturday(12-6p.m.): Jan. 27; Sundays(12-6p.m.): Jan. 28 & Feb 4; Tuesdays(7-9p.m.): Jan. 23, Jan. 30, Feb. 6, and Thursdays(7-9p.m.): Jan. 25, Feb. 1 & Feb. 8. Jamie Tennyson will be the instructor. This course will include the following certifications: CPR/FPR, First Aid and Safety and AED. Telephone registrations are being taken with a major credit card or one can register in person at the Meriden YMCA 110 West Main Street. Pre-registration is required for this class. For further information or to register; Please call (203)235-6386 ext. 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.com
MERIDEN YMCA OFFERS AMERICAN RED CROSS BABYSITTING CERTIFICATION COURSE
This certification program is designed for todays 11-15 year olds. This training course gives participants the knowledge, skills and confidence to care for infants through school-aged children. This program addresses safety issues, preventing injuries and illnesses, basic child care, first aid, decision making skills and age appropriate behavior and play. Participants learn by doing and are required to demonstrate several first aid skills including rescue breathing and dealing with a choking victim. Class will take place on Sat, December 9th from 9:00-3:00p.m. Pre-registration is required. Please contact the Meriden YMCA at 235-6386 to register today!
COME JOIN MERIDEN YMCA’S MASTERS ADULT SWIM PROGRAM
This program is designed for those adults 19 years of age and older who wish to workout with other adults accompanied by a certified swim coach. The purpose of this program is to promote fun, fitness, safety and possibly competition for all participants of whatever level of ability and interest.
The Winter Program will run from Jan. 3 – March 22. Practice Sessions are Mon & Wed> 7:30-8:45p.m and Thursdays> 8:00-9:00p.m.
For further information or to register; please contact Lisa Hoover at (203)235-6386; ext 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.com
MERIDEN YMCA YOUTH SWIM TEAM IS INVITING NEW PARTICIPANTS!
The Meriden YMCA has begun it’s registration for the youth swim team. 4 levels of participation are available ranging from the Beginner Swimmer(Bronze) to the Intermediate Swimmer(Silver) to Advanced Swimmer(Gold); Most Advanced Swimmer(Sr. Gold). Participants can choose the days they attend their practice sessions. Bronze swimmers practice from 6-7p.m. Silver swimmers practice from 5:30-7:00p.m. and the Sr.Gold/ Gold swimmers practice from 4-6p.m. Certified Coaches are available 5 days a week. 2 Certified Lifeguards are also on duty. A USS swimming division is also available for those swimmers who wish to compete on a more often basis with other organizations in addition to the YMCA League.
Pro-rated fees apply for those athletes who wish to start later on in the season due to outside conflicts.
For further information; please contact Lisa Hoover: (203)235-6386; ext. 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.com


Latke Party at Temple B'nai AbrahamMeriden, CT-November 14, 2006-Celebrate Chanukah and enjoy a delicious tradition at Temple B'nai Abraham's Latke Party on Sunday Dec. 10th from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 127 East Main Street in Meriden. Latkes are potato pancakes fried in oil. We eat them as a reminder of the cruse of oil which the Talmud says miraculously lasted for eight days instead of one when the ancient Temple in Jerusalem was rededicated after the ouster of the Syrian Greeks. While you are at the party, please visit the Holiday Fair and shop for all of your Chanukah needs. For more information, please call (203) 235-2581.Temple B'nai AbrahamTemple B'nai Abraham is a Conservative synagogue which provides religious, educational and social programming for all age groups in a warm, extended family atmosphere. Shabbat services are egalitarian, and feature congregational singing. All are welcome.

CHESHIRE COMMUNITY CHORUS HOLIDAY CONCERT DECEMBER 10, 2006 The Cheshire Community Chorus will present its holiday concert on Sunday, December 10, 2006 at 2 p.m. at the Cheshire United Methodist Church, 205 Academy Road (Rt. 68/70) in Cheshire. This year's concert is entitled, "Home for the Holidays," and will feature such popular favorites as: "I'll be Home for Christmas," "Home for the Holidays," and "Home is a Special Kind of Feeling." The Chorus will also be singing classic and contemporary holiday music, including: "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring," by Johann Sebastian Bach, " Angel's Carol," by John Rutter,""Candle in the Window, a song for Hanukkah," "The Wessex Carol," "The Gloucestershire Wassail," and "Peace on Earth, a Jazz Prayer." The Chorus began in 1980 as part of Cheshire's Bicentennial celebration and has continued uninterrupted since that time. We extend a warm invitation to everyone to enjoy the spirit of the holidays with us as we celebrate our 27th holiday season under the direction of Lisa Zolkiewicz-Ives and our accompanist Colette Switaj. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and students. They may be purchased from any chorus member or at the door the day of the concert. For more info. call Fran Liedtke (272-7164) or Marge Moser (272-2308).

Annual Christmas Candlelight Concert.
What: Annual Christmas Candlelight Concert. Holiday music and readings by the Senior Choir, Heart in Hand Bell Choir, the Celebration Singers, the Charlie's Angels Bell Choir and the African Drumming Ensemble of First Church.When: Sunday, December 10, 2006 4:00 pmWhere: First Church of Christ, Congregational, 190 Court Street, Middletown, CT Exit 15 off Route 9. Left onto Main Street and first left onto Court Street. Fee: Free Information: 860-346-6657

Come Join the Fun at Girls Inc. Winter Registration is Here.Girls Incorporated of Meriden, located at 130 Lincoln Street, will begin registration for its winter classes Monday, December 4th at 9:00 A.M. Winter classes will begin on January 2nd and will be offered for eleven weeks. Girls Inc. is offering a number of programs so be sure to check our brochure. Some of the classes being offered are Cooking, Scrap booking, Quilting, Economic Literacy, Media Literacy, Wacky and Funky Crafts, and much more. If everything sounds like way too much fun and you don't knowwhat to take come join our House Sampler and try a little bit of each program. This program allows you to sample all of the above for two days over a ten week period. Girls Inc. also has Gymnastics, Dance, Yoga, and Cheerleading. Girls Inc. has a number of exciting National Programs that will provide hands on interactive fun learning in the areas of Science, Math and Relevant Technology, Sports and Health Fitness. The National Programs really allow the girls to get involved in subject matters that are geared just for girls. Girls Inc. is also launching Saturday classes! If you are a working parent and can't get here during the week come and sign up for our Saturday dance or gymnastic classes!

Girls Inc is now offering Saturday ClassesAre you a working parent and can't make it to Girls Inc during the week? Is your daughter interested in gymnastics or dance? Well then this is for you. Girls Inc. is now offering beginner dance and gymnastic classes on Saturdays! We are also launching a mommy and me class for girls ages 2-3 years olds on Saturdays as well for both gymnastics and dance. Drop by or request a brochure listing class days, times, descriptions, and fees call 235-7146. Girls Incorporated of Meriden, located at 130 Lincoln Street winter classes will begin on January 2nd and will be offered for eleven weeks.

M. SALON AND SPA HOLDING FUNDRAISER TO BENEFIT “HOLIDAY FOR GIVING”
M. Salon and Spa, and it’s subsidiary Sunrise Tanning & Bodycare, are raising funds for The Holiday for Giving Program. This community organization, run by volunteers, functions solely on donations. All proceeds are given directly back to those in need in the Wallingford community.
Staff at the salon is contributing to this worthwhile cause by donating $5 for the privilege to wear red, green, silver or gold; colors that vary from their standard black and white dress code.
In addition, Sunrise Tanning & Bodycare will be offering specials available for “purchase” at the salon’s Annual Open House, to be held on Saturday, December 2, 2006 from 8 am – 4 pm. Clients can take advantage of traditional tanning sessions for $3 or Mystic Spray Tan sessions for $5. All proceeds will be donated to The Holiday for Giving Program. The salon will be accepting donations from November 12, 2006 through December 10, 2006.
Salon patrons can also contribute by depositing monetary donations in the “Wish Boxes” located at both M. Salon and Spa and Sunrise Tanning. Patrons may also donate new toys, gift certificates to Holiday Cinemas and/or gift cards to local supermarkets.
For more information, visit www.msalonandspa.com or www.sunrisetanning.net.


MidState Medical Center Presents "Eve of Remembrance"Join us for a quiet evening to honor your deceased loved ones and to comfort your spirit. Monday, December 11, 2006, 6:00 to 7:30 pm in the Horwitz Conference Center, 2nd Fl @ MidState. Reservations Preferred. RSVP to (203) 694-8353.

One-stop holiday shopping at Friends of Library BookstoreThe Friends of the Library Bookstore, located at 1 Colony Street in downtown Meriden, offers a treasure trove of reasonably priced gifts for holiday shoppers. Tops on anyone's Christmas shopping list are the thousands of gently used, like new, books. Everything from novels and mysteries to cookbooks, how-to, health and home-making to large coffee table books are available from $1 to $5. Brand new autographed books by local authors including Laura Van Wormer, Eddie Siebert, Lori Avocato, Beth Bruno, Bernice Shelberg and Nancy Boynton are also sold here as is the Friends own poetry book, "Well Versed Friends." The bookstore's gift shop shelves are now stocked with items created by local craftspeople including Crafty Lady soaps, lotions and holiday gift packages by Edna Roberts, Silver City Candles in holiday scents and Chilyn handmade jewelry. Puzzles and library mugs, backpacks and t-shirts are also for sale here. Bicentennial gift items including afghans, mugs, plates, wine glasses, teddy bears and golf shirts are now available exclusively at the bookstore as are Meriden t-shirts and sweatshirts, in all sizes. The Friends bookstore and gift shop are now open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Meriden Public Library and Friends of the Library projects.

Two Holiday Traditions Return!
It would not be the holiday season without the Meriden and Wallingford Substance Abuse Council’s Annual Holiday Parranda and the Mocktails recipe booklet. The holidays can be busy, but the Parranda provides a free family event for everyone to enjoy and the Mocktails recipes make entertaining fun and safe.
MAWSAC’S twelfth annual holiday Parranda will be held on Friday, December 1, 2006 at the John Barry School Cafeteria, 124 Columbia Street, Meriden from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.
A Parranda is the Spanish version of Christmas caroling that is popular in Puerto Rico.
Hector Cardona, a Meriden police officer, his family band and the Voices of Christmas singers will entertain with traditional holiday songs. Refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public. The Parranda is sponsored by the Council (MAWSAC), and supported by the Meriden Police Department, Children First Initiative, John Barry School, Midstate Medical Center, and the Meriden Housing Authority.
The 2006 Mocktails recipes have expanded to “Mocktails & More” with recipes for appetizers to accompany those festive holiday drinks. Local residents have contributed their favorites which can be viewed at www.mawsac.org or you can call for your free copy of the booklet, 203-294-3591.
Hot Mushroom Dip
4 slices of bacon 1/8 tsp. pepper
1/2 lb sliced mushrooms 8 oz. cream cheese cut in cubes
2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 cup sour cream
1 med. onion chopped 2 tsp. soy sauce
1 clove of garlic minced 2 T. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
Fry bacon and dice into small pieces. Sauté onions, mushrooms and garlic in bacon fat until tender. Mix in flour, salt and pepper. Add cream cheese. Cook until cream cheese is melted. Add sour cream and bacon. Serve with bread sticks. ( I make this ahead and reheat in oven or microwave until bubbly.)
Thanks to Judi Gallagher, Gallagher Travel Shoppe, Wallingford
Mock-A-Rita
2 oz. lemonade or limeade, unreconstituted
8 oz. cold water
1/2 oz. lime juice, if using lemonade or lemon juice if using limeade
6 ice cubes
Prepare in a blender on high for 10 seconds until light and frothy. Salt rim of margarita glass and fill.
Thanks to Beth Vumbaco, Meriden Health and Human Services
Layered Chili Dip
This hearty dip blends the spice of the chili with the coolness of the cream cheese.
Spread two 8 oz. packages of softened cream cheese or lower fat product on the bottom of a greased oven-use Pyrex dish. Top the cream cheese with a can of low-fat refried beans and a can of chili (with or without beans—your choice!). Top with shredded packaged Mexican cheese and bake at 375 degrees for 20 minutes—put it under the broiler to crisp the top layer. Serve with nacho chips and sides of diced scallions and tomatoes and sour cream. Serves 6
Thanks to Lynn Faria, MidState Medical Center
Easy Spinach Artichoke Dip
2 pkgs. frozen chopped spinach 1 jar Alfredo sauce
1 can chopped or sliced artichokes 1 8 ounce pkg. Shredded Italian blend cheese
1 tbsp. minced garlic salt & pepper to taste
tortilla chips or pita chips
Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Mix ingredients together in oven safe bowl or pan – save out ½ of the cheese. Bake for 20 minutes, then cover with remaining cheese and bake until melted and slightly golden. Serve hot with chips.
Thanks to Rosanne Ford, Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce

Something different for Holiday desert. Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie9" graham cracker crust1/2 gallon vanilla ice cream1 cup pumpkin 1/2 cup brown sugar1/2 tsp. ginger1/4 tsp. cinnamon1/4 tsp. nutmeg1 Tbsp. orange juicePlace ice cream in a large bowl. Cut it up and allow to soften. Mix pumpkin with the other ingredients using an electric mixer. Add to the softened ice cream and mix well. Heap into cooled graham cracker crust. Freeze. Garnish each serving with a dollop of whipped cream. Serves 8.
Alice Ouellette – Wallingford

HOLIDAY WISHES FOR OUR TROOPS
By Alice Mary Scott
I just received this web site address from a friend over the Internet and wanted to share it with everyone. It’s a site sponsored by Xerox.
www.LetsSayThanks.com
At this site, anyone can send a message of THANKS to our troops in Iraq, Afghanistan and other far away places. You simply pick a design, select a message already written or write your own, more personal sentiment. Type in your name and your home town and click SEND. The Xerox Company will print the card and forward your message to a lonely soldier overseas.
Even if you don’t support the war, we should all support the soldiers who fight for us. They serve our country in sometimes terrible conditions, leaving behind family, friends and special loved ones. They are lonely and sometimes frightened young people who deserve our deepest thanks for doing their jobs. Let them know you hope that we can bring them home safely and soon.

Toys for Tots
Financial Retirement Solutions is proud to be the drop off location for the Toys For Tots Campaign for Wallingford and surrounding communities.
Please stop by our office at 6 North Main Street, Suite 203 in Wallingford and drop off a new unwrapped toy. Help us to make this a joyous holiday season for needy children. Any questions, please call Financial Retirement Solutions at 800-208-7233

MADD’s “Tie One On For Safety” Holiday Campaign Asks Motorists to Pledge to Drive Safe, Sober and Buckled Up Awareness Project Celebrates 20th Anniversary
[North Haven, CT] – Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Connecticut reminds drivers this holiday season to drive safe, sober and buckled up as part of their annual Tie One On For Safety campaign. The popular holiday red ribbon program urges motorists to tie the MADD ribbon to their vehicles as a pledge to be safe on the roadways, and to especially buckle up since a seat belt is the best defense against a drunk driver.
The MADD Tie One On For Safety campaign comes at a critical time in the year when road travel and traffic fatalities traditionally increase between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Eve. In 2005, 120 people were killed in Connecticut in alcohol-related crashes. Each year in the United States, nearly 13,000 people are killed in drunk driving crashes and more than half a million people are injured in alcohol-related traffic crashes. Additionally, seat belts save lives. From 1975 through 2005, it is estimated that safety belts saved 211,128 lives, including 15,632 lives saved in 2005.
“Tie One On For Safety empowers the public to make a statement: don’t drive drunk and buckle up,” said Janice Heggie Margolis, Executive Director of MADD Connecticut. We want everyone to have a good time this holiday season and that is exactly the point of the project. If you aren’t responsible, danger may soon follow and that includes death or injury if you are driving drunk.” More than 6 million red ribbons are expected to be distributed and are available by calling the MADD Connecticut Office at 203-234-6521.
In addition to raising public awareness about the crime of drunk driving, MADD supports high-visibility enforcement such as sobriety checkpoints and saturation patrols as well as the use of alcohol ignition interlocks on the vehicles of drunk drivers. Both ultimately deter and stop drunk driving.
Founded in 1980, MADD has helped save more than 330,000 lives since its founding. MADD’s mission is to stop drunk driving, support the victims of this violent crime and prevent underage drinking. The organization and has approximately 600 MADD affiliates and 2 million members and supporters nationwide. For more information, visit www.madd.org or call the MADD Connecticut State Office at 203-234-6521. Twenty-four hour victim assistance is available by calling 1-877-MADD-HELP.


Do you know what the Meriden State Delegates think about our health care crisis?
Ask them! Healthcare4every1 Campaign Delegate Discussion
Wednesday, December 13, 2006
5:00pm - 6:30pm
Meriden Board of Education 3rd Floor Conference Room, 22 Liberty Street
Invited Guests:
Majority Leader - Representative Christopher Donovan
Representative Emil "Buddy" Altobello
Representative Catherine Abercrombie
Senator Thomas Gaffey
This is your chance to ask how they plan to address Connecticut's health care crisis:Will they support policy reform? What will reform look like? Will we truly have "universal" health care? What will it cost us?
Let your voice be heard! Be part of the process and help shape our health care policy
Tell your delegates what your "perfect" plan should look like.
RSVP necessary by Monday, December 11th Pizza provided!! Danté Bartolomeo 203-815-5758 dbartolomeo1@cox.net or Marissa Cardona 203-815-5680 cardonm@cox.net


How to make a submission to The People's Press
It's easy to make a submission to The People's Press. Although we cover local events from Central Connecticut in our newspaper, we certainly will accept stories, poems, photos and more from all over the world. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!! You can make a submission by emailing andy@peoplespressnews.com . Mailing to: The People's Press, P.O. Box 4459, Yalesville CT 06492 or going to our website www.peoplespressnews.com and press the submit button. No matter where you are from you may submit a story, poem, photo, recipe and more. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call Andrew P. Reynolds at 203.235.9333. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!!

Michael Edward Fanning, 51, Topeka, KS passed away Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2006.
Michael was born February 17, 1955 in Meriden-Wallingford, CT, the son of Edward and Louise Segaline Fanning. He married Tammy Tomlinson on May 10, 1980. Michael graduated from Horris-Wilcox Technical School and worked as an electrician for BNSF railway for 15 years. He was a member of ABATE. He served eight years in Army. He leaves to cherish his memory, his wife, Tammy, son, Paul and his wife, Candace Fanning, daughters, Allison and Ashley Fanning, grandchildren, Neaveh and Brooklyn Fanning, all of Topeka, sisters, Karen Fanning, Clairmont, VT, Maureen Dugette-Fanning, Springfield, VT, and Linda Roukey, Tuscon, AZ. He was preceded in death by his parents and a grandson, Julius James Harvey. A celebration of Michael’s life was held from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., Tuesday, at Kevin Brennan Family Funeral Home, 2801 SW Urish Rd., Topeka, KS. Services in Vermont will be announced at a later date.
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The Senior Buddy Readers Program
Seeks Volunteers
The Senior Buddy Readers intergenerational mentoring & literacy program is currently seeking volunteers for the 2006-2007 school year. Active retirees are needed to help first- and second-grade students improve their reading skills. The program runs from October through the end of May and takes place in six of Meriden’s elementary schools: Ben Franklin, Casimir Pulaski, Hanover, Israel Putnam, Nathan Hale and Thomas Hooker schools. Anyone interested in sharing one hour a week mentoring a child is invited to call the office of Meriden Children First Initiative at 630-3566. Make a difference in the life of a child…become a Senior Buddy Reader volunteer! (The Senior Buddy Readers program is sponsored by nonprofit Meriden Children First Initiative and is supported financially through foundation grants and local business donations.)
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Meriden Humane Society has opened a thrift store, also at 311 Murdock Avenue, Meriden. If you have any items you would like to donate, it would be most appreciative to receive them to bring over to the shelter. Thanks in advance for whatever help you can provide. It is a challenge raising over $200,000 yearly to support the stray and abandoned animals we serve at this no-kill shelter, so any help you can give would be wonderful. Thanks again. **
CT VNA Hospice: Volunteer
Do you want to make a difference in your life and the life of someone else?
Have you ever considered becoming a hospice volunteer? Hospice is about living life to its fullest, and we need your help to make this possible for our patients and their families. There are many volunteer opportunities available.... companionship, respite for weary caregivers, visiting patients with your pet, sharing your musical or artistic talents, or helping with clerical projects.
Training to become a volunteer with Connecticut VNA's hospice will be beginning soon. For an enriching and meaningful experience, please call today.
For more information, please call Jolan Szollosi, Volunteer Coordinator at 203-679-5342
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Lyman Hall Plans 25-year reunion
The Lyman Hall High School class of 1981 will sponsor a 25-year reunion from 7:00 p.m. to midnight Nov. 24th at Zandri’s Stillwood Inn on Route 5. The cost is $50 per person and will include open bar, buffet dinner and a disc jockey. For information, call Joe or Debi (Fusco) Mrozowski at (203) 269-3106.
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Volunteers Wanted For Meriden Public Schools
The Meriden Public Schools Volunteer Program is currently seeking media help at two elementary schools. This opportunity would consist of helping the library/media teacher check out books with elementary students and other related media tasks. If you would like to help out and have some fun, please call, Nan L Despres, Coordinator of Volunteers at 634-7985. Other volunteer opportunities in the Meriden Public Schools also exist. One half-hour a week is all that is required. Training is provided. We will work around your schedule. All are encouraged to volunteer. Retirees and bilingual are very welcome.
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Connecticut VNA Announces Grand Opening of “The Art of Hospice Care” at NOMA Gallery in Middletown
Connecticut VNA’s Hospice has planned a grand opening celebration for the debut of their traveling art exhibit entitled, “Continuing the Journey - The Art of Hospice Care.” The public is invited to attend the opening of the exhibit on Friday, October 6, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the NOMA Gallery, 648 Main Street, Middletown. The exhibit is an extraordinary and powerful multimedia display depicting the use of the arts in hospice care. It is a collection of paintings, drawings, photography, poetry, shadow boxes and more that have been done with, for and about ordinary people at the end of their lives. The exhibit highlights the unique gifts patients and their loved ones have received through Connecticut VNA’s compassionate and supportive Hospice team. Susan Rosano, an Expressive Arts Therapist with Connecticut VNA’s Hospice team and an organizer of the exhibit, said the group wanted to show the public the incredible work that is being done with people at the end of their lives and how it can contribute to the process of emotional healing for family members and friends. “The poems we write with our patients -- the collages and drawings we help them make -- their hand castings -- all have become lasting memorials to them.” Marion Donahue, President of Connecticut VNA, said the exhibit will help people understand the major role art and art therapy can play in helping them cope with a terminal illness. “The strength and intensity of the arts and complementary services in end of life care are tangible through this dramatic collection. Our complementary therapies team put a great deal of time and energy into developing this exceptional exhibit and we are very proud of what they’ve accomplished.” “Completing the Journey: The Art of Hospice Care” will be on display at the NOMA Gallery through November 17, and will then be exhibited through various venues around the state. For additional information or to learn how you can showcase this traveling exhibit, please contact Susan Rosano at 203-679-5300.
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Meeting of Parent Support Group in the Naugatuck Valley Region for parents who have out-of-control adolescent and adult children. Tough Love St. Anthony's Church Routes 68 and 69 Prospect, CT Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
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CRAFTERS WANTED
The North Italian Home Club on 43 Thorpe Avenue in Meriden will be having its annual Holiday Craft Fair on Saturday December 9, 2006, from 9:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Crafters interested in renting space may call MaryAnn at 203-238-4143 for more information.
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EXHIBITIONS AND PROGRAMS: NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2006
The Gallery's main building, designed by American architect Louis Kahn, reopens to the public on December 10. The reopening will feature masterworks from the African, Asian, early European, and modern and contemporary collections, including important new acquisitions. Information about special events for the reopening will be sent out in October. In the meantime, exhibitions, gallery talks, and master classes continue in the Gallery's Swartwout wing; please see link to PDF for complete schedule.
The Gallery's Kahn building reopens to the public on December 10, 2006.The new exhibition "Jasper Johns: From Plate to Print" opens December 10.The new exhibition "Making a Mark: Four Contemporary Artists in Print" opens December 10. The new exhibition "Responding to Kahn: A Sculptural Conversation" opens December 10.
Complete calendar of events (PDF) is available at:
http://artgallery.yale.edu/pages/info/press.html
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Volunteers Needed for the American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk Sunday, October 15
Volunteers are needed for the 12th annual American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk on Sunday, October 15, 2006, at Bushnell Park in Hartford, CT. More than 250 volunteers are needed to help the Society make strides against breast cancer. Opportunities to help include greeting walkers, registration, distributing snacks and drinks, directing traffic and parking, setup and clean up. Individuals and groups are encouraged to become involved. If you have one or more hours to help anytime from 7:00 a.m. through the afternoon, please contact Kathy Maguda at 203.379.4875, via email at Kathy.maguda@cancer.org or in person at the American Cancer Society, 538 Preston Avenue, Meriden. Making Strides is the oldest and largest one-day walk in the nation to fight breast cancer. Funds raised support the American Cancer Society's breast cancer research, education, advocacy and patient support programs. For more information about Making Strides, visit www.cancer.org/stridesonline, call 1.800.ACS.2345.
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INTERFAITH VOLUNTEER CARE GIVERS WALLINGFORD WANTED!
Volunteers to help frail, elderly neighbors shop, get to medical appointments, provide respite to a family member.
QUALIFICATIONS: People with a warm, loving heart and one or two hours of time each week. No hands-on care!
BENEFITS: Feel great about yourself! Have fun! Plan you own hours! Meet new people!
Become an Interfaith Volunteer Care Giver! Find out more by calling Marie Cunha, Social Worker, Wallingford Senior Center at 265-7753.
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MEDICARE PART D OPEN ENROLLMENT INFORMATION SESSION
Wallingford Senior Center, Thursday, October 26, 2006, 10:15 a.m.
The next opportunity to enroll in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan is November 15 through December 31, 2006. Even if you are already enrolled in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan please come learn about:
a. Medicare drug plan coverage for 2007b. How to switch from one drug plan to anotherc. Who gets "Extra Help"d. How does the "Coverage Gap" worke. How to delay or avoid reaching the "Coverage Gap"
Please register for this program by calling 265-7753; open to the public.
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Dear Business Owner:
As President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the North Italian Home Club of Meriden, I ask you to consider becoming a part of a memory. Our auxiliary is currently designing a game board devoted to celebrating our fine city and its 200-year history. The game is called SilverCityOpoly, and we are honored to be granted the right to make this game our City’s Bicentennial Edition.
You are invited to claim your spot, your square, your place on the 2006 Bicentennial SilverCityOpoly game board. There are numerous levels of participation. All property sales on the board will be sold strictly on a first-come, first-served basis. There is a list of the varied levels of sponsorship attached. All proceeds from the game sales will go to a building fund, which the Ladies have established in hopes of making improvement to our club’s grounds located on Thorpe Avenue, right here in Meriden.
Be one of the lucky folks who recognize what an incredible opportunity this is. For just a few cents per game board, you are placing a permanent advertisement to commemorate your business, your family name, the memory of a loved one or whatever you choose onto the board. That permanent part of our game board will be talked about, laughed about, played with and distributed to hundreds and hundreds of homes both within our city limits and beyond. Folks are bound to want to send our bicentennial edition to former city residents across the globe! With it will go your little piece of history?
Please place your order today. Time is of the essence. Be part of a very unique game board and be seen and heard from for years to come. Get in the game today by calling Sandy at 203-530-0236.
May you, your family and friends continue to thrive in Meriden as we all work to make our city a great place to live, work and play in. I thank you for your time.
Sincerely,
Cynthia D’Agostino, President, Ladies Auxiliary
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Platt High School Sports Card & Coin Show
Dates:January 6, 2007February 3, 2007March 3, 2007April 7, 2007May 5, 2007June 2, 2007
Table info 203-634-0069 Ernie203-235-7962 x 139 Athletic office
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Giuffrida Park – Meriden, 800 Westfield Road
Giuffrida Park was originally part of an area farmed in the late 1600s and early 1700s by Jonathan Gilbert and later Captain Andrew Belcher. This farm, the first white settlement in this region, became know as the “Meriden Farm,” and from which the whole area eventually took its name.
Mount Lamentation was named in 1636 when a member of Wethersfield Colony became lost and was found by a search party three days later on this ridge, twelve miles from home. There is some controversy whether the Lamentation refers to his behavior or that of those looking for him.
In 1735 a group of local men leased land on the western edge of this mountain in an attempt to find gold, as quartz formations there seemed promising. None was ever found. The reservoir was built by the Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company for its use in the late 1800s. The dam was raised three feet in 1927. Eventually International Silver acquired the property, because it guaranteed the company a reliable source of water, which it used in great quantities in its manufacturing processes. After International Silver built its new factory on South Broad Street, it no longer needed the reservoir. As there was a shortage of water at the time, International Silver gave the city special permission to pipe into their now-unused reservoir.
The property was offered for sale, and the Connecticut Light and Power Co. (CL&P) purchased it in order to provide itself with the land to cross high voltage lines into the Westfield section of Middletown and beyond. CL&P then sold the rest of the land to the city, which bought it under the open spaces program.
The reservoir remains a backup water source today.
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Wallingford Rotary Club
The Wallingford Rotary Club meets Wednesdays, 12:10 p.m. at Brothers Restaurant, 33 North Cherry Street. We welcome guests to come, share lunch and enjoy our weekly speaker program. The cost is $12 per person. Rotarians are dedicated to “Service above Self” in our community, La Romana in the Dominican Republic, in the worldwide battle of Polio Plus, and the family of all. Come discover how Rotarians make a difference, every day.
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Fun Events at the Wallingford Family YMCA
Friday Night Family Fit Club Come join us on the following Friday Nights to enjoy a family fitness activity. Each activity will also include a healthy snack. This is a great time for children and parents to stay fit together while having fun! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Parent's Night Out - Night on the Town This program is designed especially for children in grades K - 6. The program will take place every other Friday night from 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Kids will enjoy pizza and juice, games in the gymnasium, and swimming in the pool, while you spend some quality time together, without the kids! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Ghouls & Goblins of all ages, join us for a fun-filled Halloween afternoon adventure! Arrive in costume for a trick-or-treat parade, costume contest, creepy crafts, ghoulish games, a healthy snack and ghostly storytelling.
Scuba Santa is Coming to Town Sunday, December 10th, 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Come enjoy a holiday craft and listen to the story “A Night Before Christmas.” Then go into our pool and help Scuba Santa decorate an underwater Christmas Tree


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Meriden Public Library Children's Library Announcing two New FREE passes to Museums!! We are pleased to announce we have just received two new passes for museums at the Meriden Public Library in the Children's Room - Imagine Nation Museum in Bristol, CT. The place to spark your imagination! This museum has ESPN Play Your Way, Greenhouse, Jungle Playscape and Climbing Wall, Otis Teaching Elevator, Kid Construction Zone, Cook Nook, Water Room, Creative Arts Center, Cyber Lab, 1940's Soda Fountain, and much more. Hours are Wednesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Saturdays 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Sundays 12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. and open until 8:00 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. Our other pass is for Earthplace, the nature discovery center in Westport, CT. Earthplace maintains a 62-acre wildlife sanctuary with trails, live wildlife for public viewing, and it hosts many public nature program and events. It also has an explorer clubhouse, tiny tree house, nature lab, backyard resource center, nature theater, and wildlife dioramas. Explore the ecology lab, Animal Hall, Trails & Gardens. The grounds are open 7:00 AM. until dusk. Building open 9:00 AM.- 5:00 PM. Monday-Saturday. 1:00 PM.-4:00 PM. on Sundays. These passes can be taken out for two days with a library card and driver’s license. For more information call the Children's Library at (203) 630-6347.


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Meriden Children's Library Specials! November 13th - SCRAPBOOKING-6:30 p.m. Come to the Meriden Public Library and learn all about scrapbooking. For children in grades 2 and older, with adults welcome. Leticia Harduby, our staff professional scrapbooker, will be teaching children the art involved in scrapbooking. Bring your own personal items, such as recipes, pictures, or other items you would want to learn how to display with class. Sign up in the Children's Library, or call us at (203) 630-6347.
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MERIDEN YMCA OFFERS AMERICAN RED CROSS BABY-SITTING CERTIFICATION COURSE
This certification program is designed for today’s 11- to 15-year-olds. This training course gives participants the knowledge, skills, and confidence to care for infants through school-aged children. This program addresses safety issues, preventing injuries and illnesses, basic child care, first aid, decision-making skills, and age appropriate behavior and play. Participants learn by doing and are required to demonstrate several first aid skills including rescue breathing and dealing with a choking victim. Class will take place on Saturday, December 9th from 9:00 - 4:00 p.m. Pre-registration is required. Please contact the Meriden YMCA at 235-6386 to register today!
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COME JOIN MERIDEN YMCA’S MASTERS ADULT SWIM PROGRAM
This program is designed for those adults 19 years of age and older who wish to work out with other adults accompanied by a certified swim coach. The purpose of this program is to promote fun, fitness, safety and possibly competition for all participants of whatever level of ability and interest. This program will run three days a week; Monday and Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:45p.m and Thursdays from 8:00 to 9:00p.m. through December 14th. Participants can start at any time. For further information or to register; please contact Lisa Hoover at (203)235-6386; ext 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.com
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Brian David Doenig of Wallingford has been Awarded the 2006 Milton Fisher Scholarship due to his Designing of a Memorial Garden
The 2006 Milton Fisher Scholarships for Innovation and Creativity have been awarded to Brian David Doenig, along with seven other Connecticut students in recognition of their successful efforts to solve problems in innovative ways or to encourage creativity in their communities. From a strong applicant pool, the selection committee chose eight scholarship award winners this year. Winners receive grants from $2,000 to $5,000, depending on financial need (although the winners are selected without regard to need, the amount of each grant depends on financial need). Five honorable mentions earned grants of $1,000 each. The scholarship was open to high school juniors and seniors and college freshmen from Connecticut. To be eligible, a student had to either attend high school in Connecticut or plan to attend college in Connecticut (or both). The winners were all students who showed unusual initiative and creativity. Their innovations were in fields that included the arts, public affairs, humanitarian crises, health, and sports. The scholarship program welcomes applicants who demonstrate creativity in any field. Doenig innovatively and creatively designed and remolded an abandoned lot into a memorial garden. These original ideas thus qualified him as one of the eight awardees of the Milton Fisher scholarship The Renee B. Fisher Foundation established this scholarship in memory of Milton Fisher, whose life was marked by a passion for innovative and creative problem solving that extended across a broad range of fields of endeavor. Milton Fisher was also passionate about encouraging others to take the initiative in finding innovative and creative solutions to the problems around them, in their personal and professional lives and in the lives of their families and communities. The scholarship is administered by The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven.
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La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford
If you are nursing or planning to breastfeed your baby, please join La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford at our next meeting.
Meeting Topics Include:
Advantages of Breastfeeding to Mother and Baby Baby Arrives: The Family and the Breastfed Baby
The Art of Breastfeeding and overcoming difficulties
Nutrition and Weaning
Meeting Location: New Life Church, 92 Main St. South Meriden,CT
Meeting Dates: Third Wednesday Of each month at 9:45a.m.
Leaders: Jaime: 203-284-9735 Laura: 860-583-8996 Maryann: 203-630-0046
(Leaders are also available to answer breastfeeding questions over the phone. Please call for more information or directions)
La Leche League groups also meet in Cheshire, Hamden, Middletown, Rocky Hill and Southington. Call for more information or go online at www.lalecheleague.org
BABIES ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETINGS
North Haven Garden Club Holiday Luncheon
The North Haven Garden Club presents the 2006 Holiday Luncheon on Thursday, November 30th at 11:00 at the New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave. with a Boutique, Raffle and Gourmet Table. The Program will be “The Little Black Dress” with Bill Graham, floral designer and lecturer. Donations are $35.00. For reservations, please call 203-239-3656 by Nov 21st.
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PARENTS & KIDS FOUNDATION, INC. Of Wallingford
Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is a humanitarian and educational organization guided by the principles of faith and social responsibility, or “caring and sharing.” We serve people in the following ways: Counseling: is provided for individuals, families, women, couples, and children. A variety of support groups on various topics are offered. Call for appointments and schedule/description of activities. Recent groups: “Fun On Friday,” (art and conversation) “ Painting, Poetry, Pottery and Pizza” (women’s night out) “My Time” (nutrition, health, weight loss, exercise) Parenting / Family Education: “Raising Kids For Fun and Profit” is our trademark parenting program which focuses on communication and cooperation, discipline and decision making, rights and responsibilities, choices and consequences, and what it means to be “family.” Delivered with lots of humor and anecdotes. “We Are What We Eat or I Am A Chocolate Chip” is Nancy’s newest addition to the presentation developed because so many of our children and families are nutritionally deficient and in ill health. Chronic disease is out of control and most of it is nutritionally related and easily rectified. French fries are not vegetables. Broccoli is not a town in Italy. Fast Food on a plate is not a home cooked meal. An apple a day really will keep the doctor away and other truths I learned from my mother. Holiday Community Dinners: served Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, provide more than 500 meals each holiday. The meals are free. Transportation is provided as needed. Volunteers deliver meals and visits to the homebound, wrap presents, and write notes of encouragement. We strive to make everyone feel like they are “coming home” for the holidays. Much of the food is donated and completely prepared by volunteers. Come and join us. Adopt -A -Family grew from the holiday dinners. We have “adopted” individuals, families, nursing home residents without family, homeless shelter residents, and 100 children with AIDS. We sent holiday meals to residents in a home for the mentally retarded and gift baskets to their families. We provided materials and an instructor to a group of women learning to sew, and an artist to teach painting classes. As a need arises, we try to meet it. School Supplies Program: From paper, pens, pencils and notebooks, to backpacks, lunch boxes, sneakers, hats, gloves, jackets and more. Many children are provided the opportunity to begin their school year well supplied. Motivational Speaking: on Leadership, Communication, Positive Parenting, Nutrition and Health, and more. Guaranteed to send every audience out empowered. Focused and funny! Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is a private non-profit organization that believes children grow best in nurturing families. Nurturing families make nurturing communities. We are committed to strengthening people in all that we do. For more information on how you can become involved in any of our programs, please call. Together we can make such a wonderful difference! God’s peace and every blessing!
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We Are What We Eat
Cancer kills more children than any other disease. One in eight American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Heart disease kills more women than cancer. One in two men will have cancer in his lifetime. Americans spend $330 billion per year on heart disease. One in four children is obese. Most kids think French fries are vegetables. Some kids think broccoli is a town in Italy. This is the bad news. The good news is that most of these statistics will change if we simply change the way we eat. Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is sponsoring a six-week information and education series that will support people who want to improve the quality of their lives by changing the way we look at food. The program will be led by Nancy Freyberg, MA. Whether you are overweight and undernourished, tired of being sick and tired, thick or thin, trying to raise healthy kids in a junk food world, and feel like you are losing the battle, this program is for you. We will learn the difference between habits and heredity, treatment vs. prevention, how your body works when it takes food in, how to read labels, foods to always eat and those to never eat, truth and lies of advertising and how and where to shop. The best exercise and diet is the one you will do, so a personal program for your body type and personality will be designed. This is a program for real people who live in the real world and have to make real choices with the time, money and schedules they live with. Guest speakers will include a naturopathic physician, nutritionist, and fitness trainer. We will sample foods, share recipes, ask and answer all your questions and have lots of fun learning new ideas that really work. This program is for young people, senior citizens, and everyone in between. Two groups, limited to 10 participants in each, will meet 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, or 9:30 – 11:00 a.m. Saturdays. The cost is $75. Please call Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299 to register for the class An apple a day really can keep the doctor away!


RED SKELTON'S RECIPE FOR THE PERFECT MARRIAGE1. Two times a week, we go to a nice restaurant, have a little beverage, good food and companionship. She goes on Tuesdays. I go on Fridays.2. We also sleep in separate beds. Hers is in California and mine is in Texas.3. I take my wife everywhere..... But she keeps finding her way back.4. I asked my wife where she wanted to go for our anniversary. “Somewhere I haven't been in a long time!" she said. So I suggested the kitchen.5. We always hold hands. If I let go, she shops.6. She has an electric blender, electric toaster and electric bread maker. She said "There are too many gadgets and no place to sit down!" So I bought her an electric chair.7. My wife told me the car wasn't running well because there was water in the carburetor. I asked where the car was. She told me, “In the lake.”8. She got a mudpack and looked great for two days. Then the mud fell off.9. She ran after the garbage truck, yelling, "Am I too late for the garbage?" The river said, "No. Jump in!"10. Remember: Marriage is the number one cause of divorce.11. I married Miss Right. I just didn't know her first name was Always.12. I haven't spoken to my wife in 18 months. I don't like to interrupt her.13. The last fight was my fault though. My wife asked, “What's on the TV?” I said, “Dust!”Can't you just hear him say all of these? I love it.........this is the good old days when humor didn't have to start with a four-letter word........ Just clean and simple fun.


Tulip Tour of Homes
The Wallingford Education Foundation has recently announced that they have begun working on their "Tulip Tour of Homes" to be held on Saturday, May 5, 2007. This tour has become a significant fundraiser for the Wallingford Education Foundation and is well attended by the Wallingford community and friends. It will again feature five to six homes to tour, and will include lunch at the Gouveia Vineyards on Whirlwind Hill. Anyone interested in offering their home for a tour, whether it be big or small, old or new, please contact Judi Gallagher at 203-715-1805 or Dave Baker at 203-269-5912.


Donate Your Car to Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Before winter arrives, Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Connecticut reminds people with unwanted cars that now is the time to donate. It’s a program designed to raise funds for MADD and is being conducted throughout the state.
Anyone interested in donating a car is invited to call (203) 234-6524. Whether your vehicle is running or not, you can donate a used car, truck, boat or RV to help support MADD's mission. MADD Connecticut can pick the vehicle up from your home or business, and whether wrecked or in mint condition, every vehicle has a value, and the donation of your vehicle will help MADD fund its lifesaving mission.
You get an IRS deduction, get free vehicle pickup, and avoid the headaches and cost of selling a used car -- and help support MADD, all at once!
For more information contact the MADD Connecticut Office at (203) 234-6524.






ANTIQUE VETERANS FUNERAL SERVICE
The Antique Veterans of Meriden Post No 1 was organized to give military veterans an opportunity to get together for brotherly socialization. They meet every Thursday morning at the Meriden Senior Center at 9:30. There are no dues. Coffee and pastries are served. Neil’s Donut Bake Shop in Yalesville donates pastries, and ShopRite donates the ingredients for coffee. Cotton tan work clothes were selected as a uniform to wear for special occasions. A special Antique Veteran emblem is worn on the right sleeve, and the member’s military unit emblem is worn on the left sleeve. Awards and decorations are also worn. Military rank is not recognized. Performing a military salute for deceased Meriden and Wallingford veterans has become an important activity of the group.
The United States Military believes that all veterans are entitled to a final military salute at their funeral. The situation in Iraq has put stress on finding active Army and National Guard troops to perform this service. The minimum military salute calls for two flag folders, a rifle salute, and the sounding of “Taps.” The Antique Veterans of Meriden has a graveside funeral service, which has a uniformed veteran holding the American Flag at the head of the entombment site. A row of uniformed veterans holding patriotic flags is lined up in back of the American Flag. A bugler plays “Eternal Father” as the pallbearers carry the casket to the entombment site. The military salute begins when the religious ceremony is over. It starts with a 3-volley 4-gun salute. A bugler sounds “Taps” as trained flag folders fold the casket American Flag into the proper triangle. It is then formally presented to the next of kin. Then the flag bearers march off as the bugler blows the theme song of the deceased branch of service. It requires 15 to 20 veterans to properly perform this service. The State of Connecticut has formed an organization, which will pay $250 per funeral if a group meets their minimum requirements. The Antique Veterans feel that it is an honor to perform this service for deceased veterans. They elected to forego joining the Connecticut group and not accept the $250 per funeral. Since “9/11,” the Antique Veterans of Meriden have performed at 456 funeral services and 89 in 2006 as of October 24.
Funeral directors ask the deceased veteran’s next of kin if they would like a military salute at the funeral. The directors generally recommend the Antique Veterans for this salute because they think that it is the best service. Sometimes two funerals are at the same time. This requires the Antique Veterans to work out a schedule so that they can rush from one gravesite to the other.
The current membership mainly consists of WWII veterans and a few Korean War veterans. The WWII veterans are mostly in their 80s. Sickness and passing of the aged has taken a toll on the membership. Retired veterans are encouraged to join the Meriden Antique Veterans Post No 1 to fill the ranks of those who have passed. Younger retired veterans are needed to continue this community service.

SEARCH FOR OWLS, EAGLES, AND WINTERING WATERFOWL ON THE CONNECTICUT SHORELINEhttp://www.sunrisebirding.com/walks.htmGuilford, CT -- Guilford-based Sunrise Birding will offer a series of Bird Walks in the coming months to witness the southbound journeys of raptors, shorebirds, and songbirds and learn about the avian winter residents of the central Connecticut coast. Join professional guide Gina Nichol to search for the bird life in varied habitats along the Connecticut shoreline. The Bird Walk schedule is as follows:
Tuesday, December 12 - 3 PM, Sunset Walk at Silver Sands State Park, Milford
Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, MadisonTuesday, December 19 - 3 PM, Sunset Walk at Hammonasset State Park, Madison
Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, MadisonThursday, December 28, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, Madison The schedule includes explorations of top birding sites in Connecticut. In November, birders will be treated to a "secret" spot in Westbrook that attracts many species of migrating and wintering shorebirds. There will also be an exploration of the Lower Connecticut River in Old Saybrook, where wintering Bald Eagles and sea ducks can be seen. In December, the walks will focus on the varied habitats of Hammonasset State Park in Madison which can play host to many late fall migrants such as Northern Gannet and winter residents such as Purple Sandpiper, Lapland Longspur, Horned Lark, Hooded Merganser, Bufflehead, Surf Scoter, Sanderling, and Red-throated Loon. There is also a special Sunset Bird Walk at Silver Sands State Park in Milford to look for wintering Short-eared Owls. The fee for each walk is $5 per person, and preregistration is required. Participants are encouraged to dress for the weather and bring binoculars, water, and spotting scopes (if available). Bird checklists will be provided free to participants. Register online at http://www.sunrisebirding.com/ or by calling 203.453.6724. Sunrise Birding offers personalized, authentic, affordable travel adventures and learning opportunities intended to reveal the splendor and diversity of the natural world.


We Are What We Eat
Cancer kills more children than any other disease. 1 in 8 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Heart disease kills more women than cancer. 1 in 2 men will have cancer in his lifetime. Americans spend $330 billion per year on heart disease. 1 in 4 children is obese. Most kids think french fries are vegetables. Some kids think broccoli is a town in Italy. This is the bad news. The good news is that most of these statistics will change if we simply change the way we eat.
Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is sponsoring a six-week information and education series that will support people who want to improve the quality of their lives by changing the way we look at food. The program will be led by Nancy Freyberg, MA. Whether you are overweight and undernourished, tired of being sick and tired, thick or thin, trying to raise healthy kids in a junk food world, and feel like you are losing the battle, this program is for you.
We will learn the difference between habits and heredity, treatment vs. prevention, how your body works when it takes food in, how to read labels, foods to always eat and those to never eat, truth and lies of advertising and how and where to shop. The best exercise and diet is the one you will do, so a personal program for your body type and personality will be designed. This is a program for real people who live in the real world and have to make real choices with the time, money and schedules they live with.
Guest speakers will include a naturopathic physician, nutritionist, and fitness trainer. We will sample foods, share recipes, ask and answer all your questions and have lots of fun learning new ideas that really work.
This program is for young people, senior citizens and everyone in between. Two groups, limited to 10 participants in each, will meet 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, or 9:30 – 11:00 a.m. Saturdays. The cost is $75. Please call Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299 to register for the class
An apple a day really can keep the doctor away!



AREA CHURCHES AND ORGANIZATIONS PLAN HOLIDAY FAIRS
As always, The Peoples' Press supports YOU! If you have an event for the Holiday Season – email it to us at andy@peoplespressnews.com.

MERIDEN – The North Italian Home Club will sponsor its annual holiday craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dec.9 at the club, 43 Thorpe Ave.

Church, Synagogue - Worship Times and Services
To add your Church or Synagogue to this free service – please email andy@peoplespressnews.com
MERIDEN – Center Congregational Church, 474 Broad St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service, 8:30 a.m.. chapel service (except first Sunday of month). (203) 235-1389.
MERIDEN – First Baptist Church, 460 Broad St., Sunday – 8 and 11 a.m. service; Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. (203) 237-5529
MERIDEN – First Congregational Church, 62 Colony St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service, sanctuary; Taiwanese Christian Church, 10 a.m., chapel; 1 p.m., worship with Casa De Gozo Church, Smith Hall (203) 235-5704 or www.fccmeriden.org.
MERIDEN – First United Methodist Church. 159 E Main St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service; 11 a.m., fellowship hour. (203) 235-9620
MERIDEN – Grace Fellowship Christian Center, 131 Windsor Ave., Sunday – 11 a.m., service; Sunday school, 10 a.m. (203) 235-5325.
MERIDEN – Holy Angels Parish, 585 Main St., South Meriden, Sunday – 8:30 and 11 a.m. Mass; Saturday – 5 p.m. vigil Mass (203) 235-3822.
MERIDEN – Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, 164 Hanover St., Sunday – 9:45 a.m. service; 8:30 a.m., Sunday school. (203) 238-1248.
MERIDEN –Life of Faith Ministries, 78 E. Main St., services: 7 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. Sunday. Call (203) 440-4258.
MERIDEN –New Life Church, 92 Main St., South Meriden, West Campus, Saturday: 6 p.m. service; 262 Bee St., East Campus. Sunday: 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. services (203) 238-1114.
MERIDEN – Olive Tree Fellowship, YMCA, 110 W. Main St., Sunday – 10 to 10:45 a.m. Sunday school; 10:45 a.m. to noon, worship service. Call (860) 827-1895.
MERIDEN – Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St. Laurent parishes; Saturday vigil – Mount Carmel, 4 p.m.; St Laurent, 5:15 p.m.; Sunday – 7:30 and 10:30 a.m. Mount Carmel; 9 a.m., St Laurent.
MERIDEN – St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 20 Catlin St, Sunday – 8 and 10 a.m. service; 9:30 a.m., Sunday School.
MERIDEN –St John Lutheran Church, 520 Paddock Ave., Saturday – 5 p.m. service; Sunday – 10 a.m. service; 8:45 to 9:45 a.m., Sunday School and adult Bible study (203) 238-2331.
MERIDEN –SS Peter & Paul Orthodox Church, 54 Park Ave., Saturday, 5 p.m. vespers; Sunday, 9:30 a.m. (203) 237-4539 or www.sspeterpaul.org.
MERIDEN – St. Rose of Lima Church, 35 Center St., Saturday – 4:30 p.m. vigil Mass; Sunday – 7:30 and 10:30 a.m. English Mass; 9 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. Spanish Mass. Call (203) 235-1644.
MERIDEN – South Meriden Trinity United Methodist Church, 145 Main St., South Meriden; Sunday – 10 a.m. service; 11:10 a.m., Sunday School. (203) 235-6002.
MERIDEN – Temple B’nai Abraham, 127 E. Main St. Friday – call for time (203) 235-2581; Saturday – 9:30 a.m.; Sunday – 9:30 a.m. (when religious school is in session); Thursday – 8 a.m.
MERIDEN – Unitarian Universalist Church, 328 Paddock Ave. Sunday, 10:30 a.m. service; Sunday School, 10:30 a.m. Call (203) 237-9297.
WALLINGFORD – Church of the Nazarene, 26 Parker Farms Road, Sunday – 10:45 a.m. service; 9:30 a.m., Sunday School (203) 269-9313.
WALLINGFORD – Congregation Beth Israel, 22 N. Orchard St., Friday, 6:45 p.m. services, Oneg to follow. Call (203) 949-8656.
WALLINGFORD – Door of Hope Community Church, 120 Church St., Yalesville, Sunday – 9 and 10:45 a.m. service; nursery, pre-school, children’s and student classes at each service. (203) 741-1001.
WALLINGFORD – E and R United Church of Christ, 105 S. Cherry St., Sunday, 10 a.m. service. (203) 269-4827.
WALLINGFORD – First Baptist Church, 114 N. Main St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service; Sunday School, 8:50 a.m. (203) 269-4796.
WALLINGFORD – First Congregational Church, 23 S. Main St. Sunday – 8 a.m., communion service; 10 a.m. service; 10 a.m. church school. (203) 265-1691.
WALLINGFORD – First United Methodist Church, 941 Old Rock Hill Road, Sunday – 8:30 a.m. communion service; 10:30 a.m. service; 9:15 a.m. Sunday School (203) 269-9100.
WALLINGFORD – Good News Christian Church, 46 John St., Sunday – 9 and 11 a.m. service; 7 p.m. Wednesday (203) 284-9383.
WALLINGFORD – St John the Evangelist Episcopal Church, 360 Church St., Yalesville, Sunday – 9:30 a.m. service. (203) 269-9526.
WALLINGFORD – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 65 N. Main St. Sunday -8 a.m. English Mass and 10 a.m. service; 9 a.m. Sunday School. (203) 269-5050 or www.stpaulswallingford.org.
WALLINGFORD – SS Peter and Paul Church, 127 N. Orchard St. Sunday – 8 a.m. English Mass and 10 a.m. English/Polish Mass. Saturday – 4 p.m. English Vigil Mass. (203) 269-4617.
WALLINGFORD – White Oak Baptist Church, 20 N. Whittlesey, Sunday – 9:15 a.m. worship; 11 a.m. Sunday school. (203) 265-3548.
WALLINGFORD – Zion Lutheran Church, 235 Pond Hill Road, Saturday – 5 p.m. service, Sunday – 10:30 a.m. service, 9:15 a.m., Sunday school and Bible studies. (203) 269-6847.
SOUTHINGTON – Faith Baptist Church, 243 Laning St., Sunday – 11 a.m. service; 9:45 to 10:45 a.m., Sunday School. (860) 628-8147.
SOUTHINGTON – First Baptist Church, 581 Meriden Ave., Sunday – 10 a.m. service
SOUTHINGTON – First Congregational Church. 37 Main St., Sunday – 8:00 a.m. chapel communion; 9:30 a.m. service; 11:15 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. contemporary service; Tuesday – Taize worship, 6:30 to 7:00 p.m. (860) 628 -6958.
SOUTHINGTON – First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 232 Bristol St., Sunday – 9:30 a.m. service; Sunday School, 9:15 a.m. (860) 628-9001.
SOUTHINGTON – Grace United Methodist Church, 121 Pleasant St., Sunday – 8:30 and 10:00 a.m. services: 10:15 a.m., Sunday School. (860) 628-6996.
SOUTHINGTON – Plantsville Congregational Church, 109 Church St., Sunday – 10:00 a.m. service, 8:30 a.m. Taize service. (860) 628-5595.
SOUTHINGTON – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 145 Main St., Sunday – 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. service; 9:00 a.m., Sunday School.
CHESHIRE – Cheshire Lutheran Church, 660 W. Main St., Sunday – 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. services; 9:10 to 10:10 a.m. education hour. (203) 272-5106.
CHESHIRE – Cheshire United Methodist Church, 205 Academy Road, Sunday – 10:45 a.m. worship service; 9:30 a.m. Sunday school. (203) 272-4626.
CHESHIRE – St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 59 Main St., Sunday – 8 a.m. Rite I; 10 a.m. Rite II. Call (203) 272-4041.
CHESHIRE – Temple Beth David, 3 Main St., 7:30 p.m. service Friday, except first Friday of month when family services are at 7 p.m. Call (203) 272-0037.



Come Join the Fun at Girls Inc. - Winter Registration is Here.Girls Incorporated of Meriden, located at 130 Lincoln Street, will begin registration for its winter classes Monday, December 4th at 9:00 a.m. Winter classes will begin on January 2nd and will be offered for 11 weeks. Girls Inc. is offering a number of programs, so be sure to check our brochure. Some of the classes being offered are Cooking, Scrapbooking, Quilting, Economic Literacy, Media Literacy, Wacky and Funky Crafts, and much more. If everything sounds like way too much fun and you don't know what to take, come join our House Sampler and try a little bit of each program. This program allows you to sample all of the above for two days over a 10-week period. Girls Inc. also has Gymnastics, Dance, Yoga, and Cheerleading. Girls Inc. has a number of exciting National Programs that will provide hands-on interactive fun learning in the areas of Science, Math and Relevant Technology, Sports and Health Fitness. The National Programs really allow the girls to get involved in subject matters that are geared just for girls. Girls Inc. is also launching Saturday classes! If you are a working parent and can't get here during the week, come and sign up for our Saturday dance or gymnastic classes! A 2006-2007 Girls Incorporated membership ($30 nonrefundable) is required to be current at time of registration. Membership and class fees are due at time of registration. Girls Inc. accepts cash, checks, MasterCard and VISA.
Girls Incorporated is a nonprofit organization that inspires all girls to be strong, smart, and bold. Girls Inc. is a premier organization that inspires girls to work to their full potential and exercise their rights through program-based curriculum. Girls Incorporated of Meriden is a United Way member agency.






Square dance lessons offered
Wallingford – The Cheshire Cats Square Dance Club will offer square dance lessons from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church, 360 Church St., Yalesville. For information or to register, call Barbara Brown at (203) 237-9599 or Bernice Montefusco at 269-2569.


Katy’s Wallyworld Walker’s Annual Wine Tasting
You are cordially invited to Katy’s Wallyworld Walker’s Annual Wine Tasting to benefit The American Cancer Society Relay For Life 2007, Friday, Nov. 10, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Hungarian Club, 147 Ward St., Wallingford. Tickets are $20. Raffle, appetizers, and many wines. For tickets please contact: Katy Wall, 294-0675 or Amy Blakeslee 265-3117.
Antique Veterans of Meriden World Post No. 1
All honorably discharged veterans from all branches of military service are invited to come join us and take part in our activities. Coffee and pastries are provided for a small donation. There are no membership dues. Please feel free to come and visit us every Thursday morning at the Muravnick Senior Center 22-26 West Main St. Meriden at 9:30 a.m. We are open to all veterans worldwide regardless of where you reside.
For more info contact Richard Egan (203) 634-0474 or Kenneth Dow (203) 235-2120.







Volunteer Opportunity for Meriden, Southington and Wallingford GrandparentsMeriden Children First Initiative's 'Senior Buddy Readers' intergenerational literacy program is currently seeking volunteers to help first- and second-graders improve their reading skills. If you are retired, enjoy the company of small children, and have one hour a week to help a child read, please call Children First at 630-3566. Meriden elementary schools in need of volunteers include: Ben Franklin, Israel Putnam, Thomas Hooker and Nathan Hale. Make a difference in the life of a child...become a Senior Buddy Reader!



Wallingford Public Library News and Events
Due to reconstruction, the WPL Children’s Room will not be able to offer any events. While we are not able to provide the programs we normally have, we can assure patrons that they will still be able to choose from an ever-expanding collection of books, CDs, DVDs and other materials. They will find brand-new titles as well as their old favorites and, of course, the holiday books and music. Many free booklists are available, and staff members are always happy to help find what is needed. Speaking of the approaching holiday season, the Wallingford Public Library, throughout the month of November, will be collecting new children's books for Wallingford's Holiday for Giving Program.Sincerely, Bonnie Strickland-Naczi, Children's Librarian




United Way Day of Caring
On September 12, 2006 a total of 328 corporate volunteers from 18 companies came together to participate in the United Way of Meriden and Wallingford’s annual Day of Caring event. These corporate volunteers performed 2,502 hours of volunteer service at 27 local agencies.
In addition to lending a helping hand, the corporate volunteers gained a team-building experience. What a difference corporations can make, by volunteering to work with populations in need and making our communities an even greater place to live. Those who gave of their time and service through the 2006 Day of Caring made a huge impact.
As a result of this experience, the volunteers were afforded an opportunity to learn about the partner agencies supported by United Way of Meriden and Wallingford, and see firsthand how the United Way of Meriden and Wallingford helps people right here in community.
Working on a Day of Caring project provides a unique opportunity for a United Way donor to see their donation at work. It offers an up close and personal experience with the agency and the clients they serve. We have volunteers that request the same agency year after year due to relationships built during previous Day of Caring events.
Examples of the improvement projects taken on during the Day of Caring include: electrical work ~ landscaping ~ painting ~ baking with seniors ~ reading to children ~ organizing a food pantry ~ painting a playscape ~ attic organization ~ and much more.
Special recognition to the following companies who participated in the 2006 Day of Caring event: 3M Health Information Systems, Amphenol Corporation, Atlantic Guest Company, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Canberra Industries, Inc., Connecticut Hospital Association, CUNO, Cytec Industries Inc., First Coast Service Options, H. Pearce Company Realtors, Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Masonicare, MidState Medical Center, Ulbrich Stainless Steel Corporation, Verizon Wireless, Wallingford Rotary, Wal-Mart, Webster Bank


“Monkey bars, castles, and rainbow slides”
Hubbard Park Playground Ideas on Display at Meriden Public Library
Come see the wonderful playground ideas dreamed up by Meriden’s school children for the New Hubbard Park Playground, in a new exhibit in the Children’s Department at the Meriden Public Library, on display until the end of November. The artwork was created at the Kids Playground Design Party at Meriden’s Autumn Fest, and captures wishes ranging from traditional playground items, such as swings, slides (straight, twisty, squiggly, rainbow, and humongous), monkey bars, seesaws, and sandboxes, to creative additions such as Ferris wheels, water slides, castles, “twisty pole ride,” and a giant starfish to climb on.
For more information about the new playground email Dawn at hubbardparkplayground@peoplespressnews.com,

About the Hubbard Park Playground Committee
Mayor Mark Benigni appointed the Hubbard Park Playground Committee in June 2004. Working as volunteers under the Meriden YMCA, the committee’s mission is to build a barrier-free playground for children of all abilities to play side by side. The Hubbard Park Playground Committee works hand in hand with Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. to make the dream of a barrier-free playground at Hubbard Park a reality.

The Connecticut ASA Hall of Fame honors Ellen Biercevicz-Piazza of Wallingford
The Connecticut ASA Hall of Fame has announced its honorees for its 2006 class of inductees for the Fast Pitch wing of the newly merged softball Hall of Fame. The Slow Pitch and Fast Pitch committees announced the merger in August.
Both the Fast Pitch and Slow Pitch honorees will be recognized at the annual Hall of Fame awards dinner on Sunday, November 19th at 4:00 p.m. at Costa Azzurra Restaurant in Milford. Tickets are $35 and can be purchased by calling Ed Austin at 203-878-4036 or Jim Consiglio at 203-996-5206.
The Fast Pitch inductees for 2006 are Anthony Candido of Milford, Pat Dufficy of Trumbull, Ellen Biercevicz Piazza of Wallingford, and Bobby Quinn. Hank Koritkoski of Middletown will receive the Joseph T. Barber Distinguished Service Award.
Piazza has been a pioneer in girls’ sports as a softball player, an initiator of girls’ sports, a high school and college coach, and an athletic director. She played for the Raybestos Brakettes from 1966-1970, and was the catcher for a quartet of pitchers that may have been the best of all time: Joan Joyce, Bertha Ragan Tickey, Donna Lopiano and Donna Hebert. During her five years with the Brakettes, she competed in the National Championship finals five times, winning two national titles.
Starting her softball coaching career at Seymour High School in 1970, Piazza later became the first softball coach at Albertus Magnus College. She also coached her daughter’s 12 & under team to State & New England Championships. Piazza has been the A.D. at Lyman Hall High School in Wallingford since 1994. She is a Shelton native.

Early December Health News and Events

Meriden Health Department News
Meriden Health Department will offer Meningococcal Vaccine
The Meriden Health Department will be offering the meningococcal vaccine by appointment. The vaccine is recommended for children 11 and 12 years of age, and required for residency in colleges in Connecticut and many other states. College freshman who live in dormitories have an increased risk of getting meningococcal disease.
Meningococcal (Me-ning-go-kok-al) disease is a serious illness caused by a bacteria. This disease can cause meningitis, which is an infection of fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. The disease can also cause blood infections. It is spread through air droplets (eg, coughing and sneezing), and by direct contact with an infected person.
The vaccine is free for Meriden residents. The cost for non-residents is $20.00. Appointments are required. For more information and to make an appointment please call 630-4234.

Thank You A.C.T.I.O.N 13 Neighborhood Association!
A huge “thank you” goes out to Gwen Eaddy and the A.C.T.I.O.N 13 Neighborhood Association for hosting its first anti-litter initiative on November 18, 2006. The clean-up was organized to work in conjunction with the efforts of the City of Meriden anti-litter campaign – Take Pride Meriden. Below is her thank you to all that made the day possible: “Donations from Hunter’s Ambulance Service, Meriden Housing Authority, Meriden Health Department, Meriden Park and Recreation, Immanuel Lutheran Church, Pentecostal Assembly Deliverance Church, Shop Rite, local small business, and Mr. Bill Harris (employee of the City of Meriden) provided the necessary equipment needed for the A.C.T.I.O.N 13 Neighborhood Association litter-free community day event to be such a success. ”Meriden’s youth represented the majority of volunteers. They were of all ages, from the Women, Families and Children (WFC), school readiness program, Casmir Pulaski Elementary School, Lincoln Middle School, Washington Middle School, and Platt High School. They also had visiting volunteers from Middletown High school. The youth of our community clearly displayed pride for their neighborhood as they picked up trash and raked leaves to clean our streets. They deserve a round of applause. ”The support from the Meriden Police Department, A.C.T.I.O.N 13 community officers was outstanding. Officer Fred Rivera provided safety tips and traffic calming strategies as volunteers proceeded to clean a stretch of Cook Avenue. Officer Salvatore Nesci came to the starting point of the clean-up to offer encouragement. ”The A.C.T.I.O.N 13 Neighborhood Association would like to thank Mayor Benigni who came by the work sites and thanked the volunteers for the great work they were doing in their community. Council Person Hilda Santiago rolled up her sleeves and raked leaves and picked up trash as well. ”The A.C.T.I.O.N 13 Neighborhood Association recited an anti-littering pledge:
I pledge not to be a Litterbug.I promise to do my part to help keep Meriden Clean.No matter where I am in the City of Meriden, I will keep these words in mind.
“On behalf of the A.C.T.I.O.N 13 Neighborhood Association, we thank everyone for their support and we look forward to pitching in to keep Meriden Clean!” Submitted by Meriden’s anti-litter committee Take Pride Meriden. For more information please call 630-4238 or www.cityofmeriden.org.

Let the Shopping Season Begin!
Holiday Shopping Safety Tips from the Meriden Health Department

(November 12, 2006) – Keep this holiday season the “most wonderful time of the year” by remembering some simple shopping tips to keep children safe while hunting for that perfect present at the store.

· When in a public facility always supervise your child, and always accompany young children to the restroom. Make sure your children know to stay with you at all times while shopping and always check first with you or the person in charge before they go anywhere.

· If older children become separated from you while holiday shopping, have them meet you in a predesignated spot, such as the sales counter of the store you were in or the mall’s information booth. For younger children, teach them to look for people who can be sources of help such as a uniformed security officer, salesperson with a nametag, or a police officer. They should NEVER leave the store/mall to go to the parking lot to look for you or your car.

· Parents should not leave children alone at public facilities such as video arcades, movie theaters, or playgrounds as a convenient “babysitter” while they are holiday shopping. Never leave children in a toy or specialty stores expecting the people who work there to supervise and care for your children. They are not trained in this role, and it is not a part of their job.

· If you allow your older children to go to the mall or other activities without you, they need to take a friend. It’s more fun and much safer. Make certain a clear plan is in place to pick them up including where, what time, and what to do in case of a change of plans. Have the older child check in with you on a regular basis while they are out.

· Nothing takes the place of your supervision when you are in a public place with your children. If you are going holiday shopping and feel that you will be distracted, make other arrangements for the care of your children.

By following these tips, you can make sure that you and your children have a safe time while shopping for the holidays.


Tips are from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, www.missingkids.com

Keep Your Home Safe and Warm this Fall and Winter
Tips from the Meriden Health Department

(November 12, 2006) – When temperatures start dropping, there is nothing better than cuddling up in a warm, cozy home. To keep your family safe this winter, follow these safety tips for home heating systems:
Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning:
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, practically odorless, and tasteless gas or liquid. Carbon monoxide can come from a lot of places: unvented space heaters; leaking chimneys and furnaces; gas water heaters, wood stoves, and fireplaces; gas stoves; generators and other gasoline powered equipment; automobile exhaust from attached garages; and tobacco smoke.

Breathing in too much carbon monoxide can be very harmful to your health. The initial symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever). They include headache, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea, and dizziness.

To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning:
Keep your home well ventilated, even in the winter.
Install carbon monoxide detectors outside each sleeping room, making sure they are not covered by furniture or curtains.
Have your home heating system inspected each winter.
Have fuel-burning home appliances checked to make sure they are working properly.
Never use gas appliances such as ranges, ovens, or clothes dryers to heat your home.
Never leave a car running in an attached garage, even with the garage door open.

Portable Space Heaters
When using space heaters, be certain to:
Buy a unit that will shut off automatically if it falls over.
Read the instructions before using.
Keep heaters away from water (tubs, sinks, showers) to avoid shocks.
Keep heaters a safe distance from curtains, paper, or other flammable items.
Never leave space heaters unattended.

Fireplace tips
Always use a fire screen, and open the flues when a fire is burning.
Never leave children alone with a fire.
Don’t burn trash or paper in fireplaces.

Holiday Recipies

CHRISTMAS SNOW PUNCH Recipe

1 can (46 ounces) Hi-C Hula Punch, thoroughly chilled
2 pints vanilla ice cream, softened
2 cups Sprite, chilled


In punch bowl, combine Hi-C Hula Punch, Sprite and ice cream. Stir
until well blended and chill. Makes 32 servings.

Christmas Holly Recipe

30 marshmallows (large)
1/2 cup butter
green paste food coloring
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
4-1/2 cup corn flakes or Grannyola
cinnamon red hots


Microwave marshmallows, butter, and food coloring on 1/2 power 2
minutes, or until melted. Add vanilla and mix thoroughly. Fold in
corn flakes of granola until they are covered with cooked mixture.
Form into holly shape on waxed paper. Add candy for berries while
still warm. Once candy cools, candy will not adhere. Tie on a red
ribbon and serve.

Christmas Recipes: Haystacks


10 ounces vanilla milk or white chocolate chips
1 cup almonds, toasted
1/2 cup candied red cherries, quartered
1/2 cup candied green cherries, quartered
1/2 cup sweetened flaked coconut

Line a cookie sheet with wax paper. Stir vanilla chips in a double
boiler over low heat until smooth, or microwave on medium power for 2
1/2 minutes or until soft, then stir until smooth.
Remove from heat and stir in almonds and cherries. Drop
tablespoonsful onto prepared cookie sheet. Sprinkle with coconut.
Refrigerate until hard. Store in an airtight container.

Recipe for Christmas Joy
Merry Christmas Recipe

1/2 cup Hugs
4 teaspoons Kisses
4 cups Love
1 cup Special Holiday Cheer
3 teaspoons Christmas Spirits
2 cups Goodwill Toward Man
1 Sprig of Mistletoe
1 medium-size bag of Christmas Snowflakes (the regular kind won't
do!)

Directions:
Mix hugs, kisses, smiles and love until consistent.

Blend in holiday cheer, peace on earth, Christmas spirits and good
will toward men.

Use the mixture to fill a large, warm heart, where it can be stored
for a lifetime, (it never goes bad!).

Serve as desired under mistletoe, sprinkled liberally with special
Christmas Snowflakes.

It is especially good when accompanied by Christmas Carols and family
get-togethers.

Serve to one and all - and have a very, Merry Christmas!



Christmas Fudge Recipes

1 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/8 tsp salt
2 cups powdered sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 cup red candied cherries, chopped
1/2 cup green candied cherries, chopped


Spray an 8x8" baking dish with cooking spray. In a large saucepan,
bring the sugar, butter, cream and salt to a boil over medium heat,
stirring frequently. Let boil for 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
Remove from heat and slowly add the powdered sugar and vanilla,
stirring until smooth and well combined. Stir in the cherries until
evenly distributed. Spoon into baking dish and chill for 1 hour or
until firm. Cut into squares. Store in an airtight container.

Christmas Float

1 can coke or Dr Pepper
3 scoops of ice cream - chocalote or vanilla
4 cherries
2 red and green gum drops
red and green M&M's
whipped cream topping

Put ice cream in cup. pour soda on it. then add the whipped cream,
cherries and candy.

CHRISTMAS EGGNOG ICE CREAM Recipes

4 C. milk
8 eggs, beaten
2 1/4 C. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
4 C. whipping cream
10 T. brandy
2 T. vanilla extract
3/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon


Warm milk; add eggs, sugar and salt. Cook, stirring constantly, until
temperature reaches 155?F or until mixture coats the back of a spoon.
Do not overcook. Remove from heat and add cream. Stir occasionally
while mixture cools.

In separate bowl combine brandy, vanilla extract, nutmeg and
cinnamon. Beat flavorings into cooled custard mixture. Freeze in ice
cream freezer. Pack to let ice cream set up. Makes 1 gallon.

Christmas Cheesecake Topped Brownies Recipe

1 (21 1/2 oz) package brownie mix
1 (8 oz) package cream cheese; softened
2 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 (14 oz) can sweetened condensed milk
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 (16 oz) container prepared chocolate frosting

Preheat oven to 350?F. Grease a 9 by 13 inch baking pan. Prepare
brownie mix according to the directions on the package. Spread into
prepared baking pan. In a medium bowl, beat cream cheese, butter and
cornstarch until fluffy. Gradually beat in sweetened condensed milk,
egg and vanilla until smooth. Pour cream cheese mixture evenly over
brownie batter. Bake for 45 minutes, or until top is lightly browned.
Allow to cool, spread with frosting and cut into bars.

Christmas Bread

1 c Nonfat milk
1/2 c Sugar
2 pk Yeast
1/2 c Warm water (105 115'F.)
1/2 c Nonfat egg substitute
1 ts Vanilla
1 1/2 ts Salt
6 c Flour
1 Grated lemon zest
1 c Mixed candied fruit
1 c Golden raisins
1 tb Butter, melted
Powdered sugar
Red candied pineapple


Heat milk and sugar in saucepan to scalding, then cool to lukewarm.
Combine yeast and warm water in mixing bowl, stirring until yeast is
dissolved. Add cooled milk mixture to yeast mixture in mixing bowl.
Stir in egg substitute, vanilla and salt. Beat in 3 cups of flour and
lemon zest. Beat in remaining flour to make soft dough.

Knead in mixed candied fruit and raisins. Knead about 10 minutes,
until smooth and elastic.

Put dough in greased bowl and let rise in warm place until doubled in
bulk, about 1 hour. Punch down. Divide dough in half. Roll first half
of dough on lightly floured surface into oval about 1/4" thick. Fold
in half lengthwise. Place on greased baking sheet. Brush with half of
melted butter. Repeat with second half of dough.

Cover loaves and let rise until doubled, about 45 minutes. Bake at
375'F. 25 30 minutes, until golden brown. Let cool to warm. Sprinkle
with powdered sugar and decorate with candied pineapple or cherries.
Makes 2 loaves, or 16 servings.

Christmas Bonbons

1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup margarine; softened
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed
and undiluted
1/4 cup honey
1 1/2 teaspoons grated orange rind
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 egg
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon baking soda
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/3 cup golden raisins
1/3 cup finely chopped dried apricots
3 tablespoons chopped almonds

Cream sugar and margarine, using an electric mixer set at medium
speed, until mixture is light and fluffy (about 5 minutes). Add juice
concentrate, honey, orange rind, vanilla, and egg; beat at medium
speed until blended. Combine flour, cinnamon, baking soda, cloves and
allspice. With mixer running at low speed, gradually add to orange
mixture. Stir in cranberries, raisins, apricots, and almonds. Spoon
batter evenly into 33 paper lined miniature muffin pans. Bake at 350?
F for 20 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool in pans 3 minutes;
remove from pans and cool on wire rack.

Christmas Berry Mocha Fudge

1/4 pound butter
12 oz. can of evaporated milk
3 1/2 cups of sugar
1 heaping tablespoon of instant coffee
10 ounces Hershey's Raspberry chocolate chips
2 ounces (2 squares) bittersweet chocolate
7 ounces marshmallow cream
1 teaspoon vanilla

In a heavy saucepan melt the butter. Add evaporated milk, sugar, and
coffee. Bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly until the
temperature reaches 235 degrees F. Remove from heat and and raspberry
chocolate chips and the bittersweet chocolate. Stir the mixture until
all ingredients are melted. Add the marshmallow creme and stir until
blended. Stir in the vanilla. Pour into a lightly greased 9 X 13 inch
pan. Cut in bite sized squares when cooled.

Christmas Bark Candy

This doesn't have peppermint, but is very pretty when you
use M&M candies. Prep Time: approx. 5 Minutes. Cook Time:
approx. 3 Minutes. Ready in: approx. 15 Minutes. Makes 1 pound
(16 servings).

1 (10 ounce) package vanilla
baking chips
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups mini candy-coated
chocolate pieces

1 Line a baking pan with wax paper or foil.
2 In a microwave safe bowl combine vanilla chips and
vegetable oil; microwave on high until chips are melted. Stir
until smooth; let cool for 2 minutes. Stir in candy-coated
chocolate pieces. Spread mixture onto prepared pan; chill for
10 minutes and break into pieces

Christmas - Egg Nog Pie Recipe

4 3/4 ounce package vanilla pudding and pie filling mix
2 cups eggnog
1 1/4 cups milk
1 tablespoon light rum
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
9" graham cracker pie shell
Whipped cream
Nutmeg

Cook pudding mix for for pie filling using 2 cups eggnog and
1 1/4 cups milk. Stir in rum and nutmeg; pour into crust. Cover
surface with plastic wrap; chill several hours. Garnish with
whipped cream and nutmeg.

CHRISTMAS CRESCENT COOKIES Recipes

1/2 lb. butter (2 sticks)
2 c. flour
2 c. chopped pecans
5 tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. vanilla
1 tbsp. water
1/2 tsp. salt

Cream butter and sugar; add vanilla and water. Sift flour and salt,
stir into mixture. Add pecans and mix well. Shape into size of
walnut and shape into crescent. Bake slowly at 325 degrees about
20 minutes. While warm, roll into powdered sugar.

Christmas Date Swirl Cookie Recipe

DOUGH
1 c. white sugar
1 c. brown sugar (or 1 c. white sugar with 1/4 c. molasses)
3 eggs
4 c. flour (whole wheat or add wheat germ and bran to unbleached flour)
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. lite salt
1 tsp. cinnamon

FILLING
1 lb. (or 2 1/2 c.) chopped dates
1/2 c. sugar
1 c. water

Cook filling over medium heat, stirring constantly until consistency
of jam. Mix dough ingredients in order. Divide in half. Roll out each
half to 1/2 inch thickness. Take cooled filling and spread over dough
and roll up like a jelly roll. Wrap rolls in unwaxed paper and freeze;
freeze hard. Turn frozen rolls as you slice them. Place slices on
greased cookie sheets and bake at 350 degrees for approximately 15
minutes. (The time to bake depends on how thick you want to slice them.)

Christmas Fruitcake Cookies Recipes

1 c. butter, softened
1 1/2 c. sugar
2 eggs
2 1/2 c. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. cinnamon
2 (8 oz.) pkgs. pitted dates, chopped
3 c. pecans, chopped
1 (8 oz.) pkg. candied pineapple,
chopped
1 (8 oz.) pkg. candied cherries,
quartered

Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, beat well. Add dry ingredients
and mix well. Add the rest. Drop on lightly greased cookie sheet.
Bake at 375 degrees for 13 minutes.

Grandma's Christmas Candy

Makes 1 pound (24 servings).

2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup butter
2 cups crunchy peanut butter


Directions
1 Line a 9 X13 inch pan with foil. Set aside.
2 In the top pot of a double boiler set, slowly melt
chocolate pieces and butter until smooth. Add peanut butter and
stir until well mixed.
3 Pour chocolate mixture into pan; cover and chill in
refrigerator until hardened. Cut into small squares and serve.

Perfect Resipes for Christmas and Thanksgiving

I find it easier to double the recipe and make two loaves at once
since we have so many elves to feed (not to mention Santa himself).


Sift: 2 cups flour (sifted), 1 cup sugar, 1 and 1/2 tsp baking
powder, 1 tsp salt (I never use it), and 1/2 tsp baking soda.


Cut in 1/4 cup butter (I use Promise Extra Light margarine sticks-it
makes the bread really moist) until mixture is crumbly (I use a mixer
to crumble-ize it)


Add 1 beaten egg, 1 tsp grated orange peel (I use a grater/peeler
doohickey and grate an entire orange for every two loaves.), and 3/4
cup orange juice. (If you can get your Elves to do the grating, it
will help) mix until mixture is evenly moist.

Fold in as many light raisins as you think looks good (the recipe
calls for 1 and 1/2 cups, I never measure) and about a half bag of
chopped cranberries per loaf. spoon into a greased 9 x 5 x 3 loaf pan
bake at 350' for 1 hour and 10 mins or until toothpick in center
comes out clean. I never use the toothpick test, but I suppose it is
a good idea.

Cool out of pan on a wire rack. keep stored in aluminum foil, unless
you eat it all before it cools.

If it doesn't come out well the first time, that is OK, it took Mrs.
Claus 3 or 4 attempts before she learned to make it consistently
excellent.

Hard Sauce

Perfect for Christmas and Thanksgiving pies or bread or even by the
spoonful


Ingredients:

1 stick of butter, softened
1 egg
2 boxes of powdered (confectionary) sugar
Sherry (Harvey's Bristol Cream works well)


Directions:

Mix butter and egg


Add sugar slowly, mixing as you add.

As it gets thicker, add a little sherry at a time until it is desired
consistency (generally like icing for a cake).

Refrigerate

American Indian Cold Christmas Cake Recipe

1 lb. pecans or walnuts, chopped
1 lb. shredded moist coconut
1 lb. raisans
1 lb. vanilla wafers
1 regular can sweetened condensed milk

Combine dry ingredients well. Pour in sweentened condensed milk and
work through with hands so that dry ingredients are thoroughly
saturated. Press into spring foam pan. Refrigerate for 2 days. My
Cherokee ancestors used hazelnuts, dates and thick goats milk, then
wrapped the cake in watertight leaves bound with vine and placed in
cold running stream for several days. This is delicious and easy.

Quick and easy popcorn balls
3 oz. Jell-O (any flavor)
1 cup sugar
1 cup corn syrup
4 quarts freshly popped popcorn

Cook the first three ingredients, bringing to a boil. Pour over
popped corn. Quickly shape into balls with buttered hands.

Popcorn Candy Clusters

1 cup freshly popped popcorn
1 cup (8 oz.) semi-sweet chocolate chips
1 cup nuts

In a saucepan, melt chocolate chips. Add popcorn and nuts and stir
until they are well coated. Drop by spoonfuls (clusters) onto a
cookie sheet or wax paper and let set until firm. If you are in a
hurry to eat these, chill the clusters in the freezer for five
minutes. When firm, store in plastic bags.
Christmas Fudge

2 cups sugar
1 cup light cream
1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup marshmallows, miniature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup pecan halves
1/3 cup candied cherries, chopped
1/3 cup green candied cherries, chopped

Combine sugar, cream, butter, syrup and salt in a heavy saucepan.
Bring to a gentle boil over low heat. Cook, stirring constantly,
until sugar melts. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until
mixture reaches 240 degrees on candy thermometer. This is the soft
ball stage. Remove from heat; stir in marshmallows and vanilla.

Stir until marshmallows melt and candy starts to lose its gloss. Stir
in pecan halves and chopped cherries. Continue stirring until candy
starts to set.

Pour into buttered 8-inch square pan. Cool, then cut into squares.


Chocolate Covered Pretzels

3 bags large pretzels
2 bags small pretzels
1 bag each Christmas colors of chocolate
Assortment of toppings: Nuts, colored sprinkles and drizzled colored
chocol


Melt chocolate colors individually on a low burning stove. When
chocolate is completely melted, drop pretzels in and coat with a
layer of chocolate, drain off excess and lay on a sheet of wax paper.
While still wet. Sprinkle on your toppings. Wait till dry and then
wrap as many as you like in "special" holiday cello bags, tied with
pretty ribbons. What a wonderful way to say "Thank You" to someone
who did something nice for you during the year. Looks festive on a
pretty clear dish. Enjoy!


Gingerbread Ornaments

1/2 cup butter
1/2 teaspoon salt
6 Tablespoons baking soda
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 cup molasses
1 1/2 teaspoons ginger
1 egg
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder


Cream butter with sugars, molasses and egg yolk. Mix all remaining
ingredients, except egg white. Stir into butter mixture to form stiff
dough. Chill for 1 hour, then roll out onto a floured surface to 1/8
inch thickness. Use Christmas cookie cutters or knife to cut our
shapes. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter cookie sheets and place
shapes on sheet. Brush shapes lightly with egg whites. Bake 8 minutes
until crisp. Make a hole 1 inch from the top, then cool. Ice
ornaments as you wish. Thread holes with gold cord.


Kool Whip Cookies


Ingredients
1 cake mix any flavor you prefer
1 large container Kool Whip
nuts or candies, use your imagination
Method
Mix together, and drop on ungreased cookie sheet.
Bake until tops are firm in a 350 F. oven.

Yield: 4 dozen

These are quick and easy for the working parents, and children love
to help, with Christmas cookies.
To top it off they melt in your mouth

CHOCOLATE CHRISTMAS LOG


Chocolate Sponge:

1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar

6 egg yolks

6 egg whites

3/4 tsp cream of tartar

1 tbsp cocoa powder

4 oz. bittersweet chocolate, melted


Mix 1/4 cup sugar with yolks until light and fluffy. Set aside. Whip
whites until soft peaks form, slowly add 2 tablespoons sugar and
continue mixing. Add cream of tartar, cocoa powder and chocolate into
yolks. Gently fold whites into yolks. Spread evenly on prepared sheet
pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes.


Filling:

1 cup heavy cream

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

1 tablespoon sugar (whip together)


Frosting:

12 oz. bittersweet chocolate

1-2/3 cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons cognac


Chop chocolate. Add boiling cream and cognac. Blend and chill to
proper consistency.


Meringue Mushrooms:

3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons superfine sugar

4 egg whites

1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

1/2 cup cocoa powder for dusting


Whip whites to soft peaks, add tartar and sugar slowly. Pipe meringue
into mushroom shape, sprinkle cocoa powder over top for natural look
and bake at 200 degrees, until dry. (Approximately 6 hours.)


Spread the filling on the sponge and carefully roll up the cake.
Spread the frosting on the log and decorate with the mushroom
meringues. You might like to add leaves, berries and powdered sugar
as well, being careful to avoid anything toxic.

Light Christmas Fruit Cake

1/2 pound Butter or Margarine
1 cup White Sugar
3 Eggs, separated into whites and yolks
1 tsp Baking Powder
2 3/4 cups Pastry Flour
1 cup heated Pineapple Juice
2 tsp Vanilla Extract
2 cups Golden Raisins
1 1/2 cups Red Glazed Cherries
1 1/2 cups Green Glazed Cherries
1 cup Mixed Peel
2 cups Brazil Nuts (or your favourite nut)

Cream together the butter and sugar. Add the egg yolks, extract and
pineapple juice and mix well. In a separate bowl, combine the fruit
and 1/2 of the flour. Add the remaining flour and baking powder to
the fruit. Mix the two mixtures together. Add 3 stiffly beaten egg
whites. Bake for 1 hour at 350 F and another hour at 300 F. To keep
the cake moist, add a pan of water to the oven while baking.


Christmas - Egg Nog Pie Recipe

4 3/4 ounce package vanilla pudding and pie filling mix
2 cups eggnog
1 1/4 cups milk
1 tablespoon light rum
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
9" graham cracker pie shell
Whipped cream
Nutmeg

Cook pudding mix for for pie filling using 2 cups eggnog and
1 1/4 cups milk. Stir in rum and nutmeg; pour into crust. Cover
surface with plastic wrap; chill several hours. Garnish with
whipped cream and nutmeg.

CHRISTMAS CRESCENT COOKIES Recipe

1/2 lb. butter (2 sticks)
2 c. flour
2 c. chopped pecans
5 tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. vanilla
1 tbsp. water
1/2 tsp. salt

Cream butter and sugar; add vanilla and water. Sift flour and salt,
stir into mixture. Add pecans and mix well. Shape into size of
walnut and shape into crescent. Bake slowly at 325 degrees about
20 minutes. While warm, roll into powdered sugar.

Christmas Date Swirl Cookies Recipes

DOUGH
1 c. white sugar
1 c. brown sugar (or 1 c. white sugar with 1/4 c. molasses)
3 eggs
4 c. flour (whole wheat or add wheat germ and bran to unbleached flour)
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. lite salt
1 tsp. cinnamon

FILLING
1 lb. (or 2 1/2 c.) chopped dates
1/2 c. sugar
1 c. water

Cook filling over medium heat, stirring constantly until consistency
of jam. Mix dough ingredients in order. Divide in half. Roll out each
half to 1/2 inch thickness. Take cooled filling and spread over dough
and roll up like a jelly roll. Wrap rolls in unwaxed paper and freeze;
freeze hard. Turn frozen rolls as you slice them. Place slices on
greased cookie sheets and bake at 350 degrees for approximately 15
minutes. (The time to bake depends on how thick you want to slice them.)



Christmas Fruitcake Cookies

1 c. butter, softened
1 1/2 c. sugar
2 eggs
2 1/2 c. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. cinnamon
2 (8 oz.) pkgs. pitted dates, chopped
3 c. pecans, chopped
1 (8 oz.) pkg. candied pineapple,
chopped
1 (8 oz.) pkg. candied cherries,
quartered

Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, beat well. Add dry ingredients
and mix well. Add the rest. Drop on lightly greased cookie sheet.
Bake at 375 degrees for 13 minutes.

Grandma's Christmas Candy

Makes 1 pound (24 servings).

2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup butter
2 cups crunchy peanut butter


Directions
1 Line a 9 X13 inch pan with foil. Set aside.
2 In the top pot of a double boiler set, slowly melt
chocolate pieces and butter until smooth. Add peanut butter and
stir until well mixed.
3 Pour chocolate mixture into pan; cover and chill in
refrigerator until hardened. Cut into small squares and serve.

Friday, December 01, 2006

Your Message Board is now Online!!!!

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

GREATER MERIDEN CHAMBER HOLIDAY BUSINESS AFTER HOURS & MERIDEN YMCA SILENT AUCTION

The Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce is pleased to present the Annual Holiday Networking Business After Hours that will include the Meriden YMCA’s Silent Auction!

The event is open to the public with a $15 per person fee that includes complimentary beer, wine, soft drinks and an array of hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, Fantastic Raffle Prizes, Silent Auction Viewing / Bidding and more! A cash bar will also be available.

In addition, we will gladly accept new unwrapped toys that will be distributed to those in need during this holiday season. Those who bring a toy will be entered into a special raffle.

The event will be held on Tuesday, December 5 th from 5 – 7:30 p.m. at Il Monticello, 557 South Broad Street (Meriden-Wallingford line).

The event is generously co-sponsored by Il Monticello, Executive Auto Group, A.R. Mazzotta Employment Specialists, New England Enterprises, Residential Home Funding Corp., Silver City Sound & Video Production, and Suzio York Hill Companies.

Join us for the networking event of the season and support the Meriden YMCA by bidding on a variety of lovely gifts. Some auction items include: 1 week stay in Jamestown Rhode Island Condo for 6; 1 week stay in a Beach Front Condo in Myrtle Beach, North Carolina; Plane ride along the Hudson River to Manhattan; Romantic Dinner Getaway at a Meriden Landmark; Television; Theater Tickets; Sports Memorabilia; Golf Package; Suzio Collectible Trucks and more!

Please RSVP to the Chamber office at 203.235.7901.

The Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce is an independent, non-profit membership organization whose mission is to encourage and promote the advancement of commercial, industrial and community interests of the Greater Meriden area. Over 650 members strong, we encourage all businesses who would like exposure and promotion in the Greater Meriden area to join us!





Rosanne P. Ford
Vice President, Membership Services
The Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce, Inc. 3 Colony St. ; Suite 301 Meriden , CT 06451 Ph: 203.235.7901 Fx: 203.686.0172 The Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce, Inc. - Leading and Promoting Business and Community since 1896 You can visit the chamber on line at www.meridenchamber.com

Tuesday, November 21, 2006

I see trees of green........ red roses tooI see em bloom..... for me and for you
And I think to myself.... what a wonderful world.
I see skies of blue..... clouds of white
Bright blessed days....dark sacred nights
And I think to myself .....what a wonderful world.
The colors of a rainbow.....so pretty ..in the sky
Are also on the faces.....of people ..going byI see friends shaking hands.....sayin..
how do you do
Theyre really sayin......i love you.
I hear babies cry......
I watch them grow
Theyll learn much more.....than Ill never know
And I think to myself .....what a wonderful world
The colors of a rainbow.....so pretty ..in the sky
Are there on the faces.....of people ..
going byI see friends shaking hands.....sayin.. how do you do
Theyre really sayin...*spoken*(
I ....love....you).I hear babies cry......
I watch them grow*spoken*(you know their gonna learnA whole lot more than Ill never know)And I think to myself .....what a wonderful world
Yes I think to myself .......what a wonderful world.

Friday, November 17, 2006

Upcoming Events Mid-Late November

How to make a submission to The People's Press
It's easy to make a submission to The People's Press. Although we cover local events from Central Connecticut in our newspaper, we certainly will accept stories, poems, photos and more from all over the world. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!! You can make a submission by emailing http://us.f509.mail.yahoo.com/ym/Compose?To=andy@peoplespressnews.com . Mailing to: The People's Press, P.O. Box 4459, Yalesville CT 06492 or going to our website http://www.peoplespressnews.com/ and press the submit button. No matter where you are from you may submit a story, poem, photo, recipe and more. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call Andrew P. Reynolds at 203.235.9333. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!! The deadline for our next issue is November 25, 2006.

WALLINGFORD COMMUNITY DINNERS
Come celebrate the holiday with us! Enjoy turkey and all the trimmings – with music, laughter, and a good time for all!
WHEN: THANKSGIVING DAY & CHRISTMAS DAY NOON – 2:00 PMWHERE: FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF WALLINGFORD 23 S. MAIN ST. TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED MEALS WILL BE DELIVERED TO THE HOMEBOUND DON’T SPEND THE HOLIDAY ALONE!! FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299
Sponsored by: Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. and First Congregational Church of Wallingford
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Looking to make some extra money for the holidays - refer a locally owned business to The People's Press and if they run an ad - you will make 10% of the ad sale after payment. All for just giving out my name and number - Andy at The People's Press - 203.235.9333. It's that easy and being 1 person you can help me support your write to right.

Meriden Humane Society has opened a thrift store, also at 311 Murdock Avenue, Meriden. If you have any items you would like to donate, it would be most appreciative to receive them to bring over to the shelter. Thanks in advance for whatever help you can provide. It is a challenge raising over $200,000 yearly to support the stray and abandoned animals we serve at this no-kill shelter, so any help you can give would be wonderful. Thanks again. **

Lyman Hall Plans 25-year reunion
The Lyman Hall High School class of 1981 will sponsor a 25-year reunion from 7:00 p.m. to midnight Nov. 24th at Zandri’s Stillwood Inn on Route 5. The cost is $50 per person and will include open bar, buffet dinner and a disc jockey. For information, call Joe or Debi (Fusco) Mrozowski at (203) 269-3106.
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HOLY ANGELS CHURCH SEEKS CRAFTERS FOR HOLIDAY BAZAAR
Holy Angels Church, 585 Main Street in South Meriden is seeking Vendors and Craftspeople for its annual holiday bazaar “Christmas on the Hill” to be held on Saturday, November 18. The Bazaar will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Holy Angels Parish Center. The bazaar will feature crafts, food, baked goods and raffle prizes. There is a per-table charge. For further information (203) 235-3822.
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Enter Essay Contest to Win New Playground for Hubbard Park
Please help win a new barrier-free handicapped accessible playground for Hubbard Park! Hasbro is sponsoring an essay contest offering a $300,000 Boundless Playground for one grand prize winner's community, and online gift cards valued at $125 each for 20 finalist prize winners. Submit an original 500- to 750-word essay by November 30th, along with the completed entry form. One entry per family. Go to www.hasbro.com/playskool, click on In the Community/ Boundless Playground for contest rules and to download the entry form. For more information about the playground project send an email to hubbardParkPlayground@peoplespressnews.com
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Volunteers Wanted For Meriden Public Schools
The Meriden Public Schools Volunteer Program is currently seeking media help at two elementary schools. This opportunity would consist of helping the library/media teacher check out books with elementary students and other related media tasks. If you would like to help out and have some fun, please call, Nan L Despres, Coordinator of Volunteers at 634-7985. Other volunteer opportunities in the Meriden Public Schools also exist. One half-hour a week is all that is required. Training is provided. We will work around your schedule. All are encouraged to volunteer. Retirees and bilingual are very welcome.
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Tough Love St. Anthony's Church Routes 68 and 69 Prospect, CT Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
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CRAFTERS WANTED
The North Italian Home Club on 43 Thorpe Avenue in Meriden will be having its annual Holiday Craft Fair on Saturday December 9, 2006, from 9:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Crafters interested in renting space may call MaryAnn at 203-238-4143 for more information.
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EXHIBITIONS AND PROGRAMS: NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2006
The Gallery's main building, designed by American architect Louis Kahn, reopens to the public on December 10. The reopening will feature masterworks from the African, Asian, early European, and modern and contemporary collections, including important new acquisitions. Information about special events for the reopening will be sent out in October. In the meantime, exhibitions, gallery talks, and master classes continue in the Gallery's Swartwout wing; please see link to PDF for complete schedule.
The Gallery's Kahn building reopens to the public on December 10, 2006.The new exhibition "Jasper Johns: From Plate to Print" opens December 10.The new exhibition "Making a Mark: Four Contemporary Artists in Print" opens December 10. The new exhibition "Responding to Kahn: A Sculptural Conversation" opens December 10.
Complete calendar of events (PDF) is available at:
http://artgallery.yale.edu/pages/info/press.html
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“A Night for Noah” Dance featuring Riverstreet
Saturday, November 18, 2006, Mountainside Outing Club, 8:00 p.m.
Ticket Info:
Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at the following locations in Meriden:
JC Music
529 West Main Street
Fishers Fine Foods
21 South Colony Street
Katz Sports Shop
519 West Main Street
Valencia Liquors
1231 East Main Street
If you are interested in purchasing tickets or would like to volunteer for this event, please call Kathy Showerda at 203/235-4508 or Nancy Crispino at 203/237-7908.
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Platt High School Sports Card & Coin Show
Dates: December 2, 2006January 6, 2007February 3, 2007March 3, 2007April 7, 2007May 5, 2007June 2, 2007
Table info 203-634-0069 Ernie203-235-7962 x 139 Athletic office

Quilt Show and Bake Sale
The Northford Congregational Church is holding a Quilt Show and Bake Sale, November 18th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. View over 30 handmade quilts on loan from area quilters and quilt owners. Many antique and modern quilts will be on exhibit. The quality and craftsmanship are a must see! Tickets are $5. After the exhibit, enjoy a complimentary dessert, coffee/tea in the social hall while you peruse the homemade desserts from the Bake Sale table and stock up for Thanksgiving! There will also be Quilting materials from Quadrille Quilting, LLC, on sale in the social hall. Raffle tickets for our homemade quilt, weekend in Vermont and other prizes can also be purchased. For Quilt Show tickets, you can call the church office at 484-0795 or you can purchase them at the door.
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Fun Events at the Wallingford Family YMCA
Friday Night Family Fit Club Come join us on the following Friday Nights to enjoy a family fitness activity. Each activity will also include a healthy snack. This is a great time for children and parents to stay fit together while having fun! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Parent's Night Out - Night on the Town This program is designed especially for children in grades K - 6. The program will take place every other Friday night from 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Kids will enjoy pizza and juice, games in the gymnasium, and swimming in the pool, while you spend some quality time together, without the kids! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Ghouls & Goblins of all ages, join us for a fun-filled Halloween afternoon adventure! Arrive in costume for a trick-or-treat parade, costume contest, creepy crafts, ghoulish games, a healthy snack and ghostly storytelling. Youth and Teens- Join us for a ghoulishly fun Halloween overnight adventure! The fun begins at 7:00 pm on Saturday evening and doesn't stop until 9:00 am on Sunday morning. Arrive in costume and enjoy a ghostly scavenger hunt, creatively cool costume show, splashingly fun swim adventure (bring your swimsuit) and fall asleep listening to ghastly ghostly storytelling. Take a journey through our spook house, if you DARE! Breakfast will be provided.
Child Care Fun Fair - Saturday, November 18th, 11:30 - 1:30 p.m. Come one, come all to our Child Care Fun Fair! There will be a variety of activities for your family including our fintastic fishing game, pin the feather on the turkey, and our famous YMCA turkey trot. Register at the Welcome Center between October 1st and November 1st. Upon registration, your family's name will be put in our raffle for our YMCA Child Care "Basket of Fun". The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Saturday, December 9th, 2:00 p.m.Limit 40. Place: Paul Melon Arts Center, Choate Rosemary Hall Appropriate for grades 1 - 7 This musical is based on C.S. Lewis' story about four children who enter the land of Narnia by mistake. Scuba Santa is Coming to Town Sunday, December 10th, 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Come enjoy a holiday craft and listen to the story “A Night Before Christmas.” Then go into our pool and help Scuba Santa decorate an underwater Christmas Tree

Highland School 23rd Annual Craft Fair Highland School PTO will sponsor its 23rd annual Craft Fair on Saturday, December 2, 2006 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the school on Highland Avenue in Wallingford. There will be over 65 vendors selling items, such as jewelry, paintings, florals, holiday ornaments, woodworking, quilts, gift baskets, candy,knitting, sweatshirts, centerpieces, photography, animal treats, et cetera. Refreshments will be available including homemade apple crisp. Admission is free. For additional information contact the school or call 203-314-3413.

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Meriden Public Library Children's Library Announcing two New FREE passes to Museums!! We are pleased to announce we have just received two new passes for museums at the Meriden Public Library in the Children's Room - Imagine Nation Museum in Bristol, CT. The place to spark your imagination! This museum has ESPN Play Your Way, Greenhouse, Jungle Playscape and Climbing Wall, Otis Teaching Elevator, Kid Construction Zone, Cook Nook, Water Room, Creative Arts Center, Cyber Lab, 1940's Soda Fountain, and much more. Hours are Wednesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Saturdays 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Sundays 12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. and open until 8:00 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. Our other pass is for Earthplace, the nature discovery center in Westport, CT. Earthplace maintains a 62-acre wildlife sanctuary with trails, live wildlife for public viewing, and it hosts many public nature program and events. It also has an explorer clubhouse, tiny tree house, nature lab, backyard resource center, nature theater, and wildlife dioramas. Explore the ecology lab, Animal Hall, Trails & Gardens. The grounds are open 7:00 AM. until dusk. Building open 9:00 AM.- 5:00 PM. Monday-Saturday. 1:00 PM.-4:00 PM. on Sundays. These passes can be taken out for two days with a library card and driver’s license. For more information call the Children's Library at (203) 630-6347.


MERIDEN YMCA OFFERS AMERICAN RED CROSS BABY-SITTING CERTIFICATION COURSE
This certification program is designed for today’s 11- to 15-year-olds. This training course gives participants the knowledge, skills, and confidence to care for infants through school-aged children. This program addresses safety issues, preventing injuries and illnesses, basic child care, first aid, decision-making skills, and age appropriate behavior and play. Participants learn by doing and are required to demonstrate several first aid skills including rescue breathing and dealing with a choking victim. Class will take place on Saturday, December 9th from 9:00 - 4:00 p.m. Pre-registration is required. Please contact the Meriden YMCA at 235-6386 to register today!
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COME JOIN MERIDEN YMCA’S MASTERS ADULT SWIM PROGRAM
This program is designed for those adults 19 years of age and older who wish to work out with other adults accompanied by a certified swim coach. The purpose of this program is to promote fun, fitness, safety and possibly competition for all participants of whatever level of ability and interest. This program will run three days a week; Monday and Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:45p.m and Thursdays from 8:00 to 9:00p.m. through December 14th. Participants can start at any time. For further information or to register; please contact Lisa Hoover at (203)235-6386; ext 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.com
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Holiday Bazaar
“A Village Christmas,” South Meriden Trinity Methodist Church, 145 Main Street, South Meriden
November 18th, 9:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Handmade Grafts - Luncheon Café, Baked Goods - Jewelry
Contact: Edie Marcantonio ,235-4810 Nite – 235-5759 Daytime
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La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford
If you are nursing or planning to breastfeed your baby, please join La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford at our next meeting.
Meeting Topics Include:
Advantages of Breastfeeding to Mother and Baby Baby Arrives: The Family and the Breastfed Baby
The Art of Breastfeeding and overcoming difficulties
Nutrition and Weaning
Meeting Location: New Life Church, 92 Main St. South Meriden,CT
Meeting Dates: Third Wednesday Of each month at 9:45a.m.
Leaders: Jaime: 203-284-9735 Laura: 860-583-8996 Maryann: 203-630-0046
(Leaders are also available to answer breastfeeding questions over the phone. Please call for more information or directions)
La Leche League groups also meet in Cheshire, Hamden, Middletown, Rocky Hill and Southington. Call for more information or go online at www.lalecheleague.org
BABIES ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETINGS

North Haven Garden Club Holiday Luncheon
The North Haven Garden Club presents the 2006 Holiday Luncheon on Thursday, November 30th at 11:00 at the New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave. with a Boutique, Raffle and Gourmet Table. The Program will be “The Little Black Dress” with Bill Graham, floral designer and lecturer. Donations are $35.00. For reservations, please call 203-239-3656 by Nov 21st.
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RED SKELTON'S RECIPE FOR THE PERFECT MARRIAGE1. Two times a week, we go to a nice restaurant, have a little beverage, good food and companionship. She goes on Tuesdays. I go on Fridays.2. We also sleep in separate beds. Hers is in California and mine is in Texas.3. I take my wife everywhere..... But she keeps finding her way back.4. I asked my wife where she wanted to go for our anniversary. “Somewhere I haven't been in a long time!" she said. So I suggested the kitchen.5. We always hold hands. If I let go, she shops.6. She has an electric blender, electric toaster and electric bread maker. She said "There are too many gadgets and no place to sit down!" So I bought her an electric chair.7. My wife told me the car wasn't running well because there was water in the carburetor. I asked where the car was. She told me, “In the lake.”8. She got a mudpack and looked great for two days. Then the mud fell off.9. She ran after the garbage truck, yelling, "Am I too late for the garbage?" The river said, "No. Jump in!"10. Remember: Marriage is the number one cause of divorce.11. I married Miss Right. I just didn't know her first name was Always.12. I haven't spoken to my wife in 18 months. I don't like to interrupt her.13. The last fight was my fault though. My wife asked, “What's on the TV?” I said, “Dust!”Can't you just hear him say all of these? I love it.........this is the good old days when humor didn't have to start with a four-letter word........ Just clean and simple fun.

AMERICAN RED CROSS OFFERS TRAINING COURSES
The South Central Connecticut Chapter of the American Red Cross is currently accepting registrations for upcoming Health & Safety courses.
The American Red Cross Community lifesaving courses are designed to help responders feel more confident in their ability to act appropriately in the event of an emergency. The program includes information on topics such as First Aid, CPR, and preventing disease transmission. The program is comprised of courses for adult, child, and infant care.
The schedule of lifesaving classes offered at the Wallingford/Meriden Branch Office for November 2006 follows. Please call the appropriate office to register. Pre-registration is required.
Branch Office Classes: 144 South Main Street, Wallingford. 203-265-6721
Standard First Aid with CPR-Adult: November 18, 2006, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Additional information may be found on the American Red Cross website at www.arcsct.org

Don't miss out on the most festive Holiday Fair in town!
The Ladies of St. Anne Society of St. Laurent Church, 121 Camp St., Meriden, will host their Annual Holiday Fair on Saturday, November 18th from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m., and Sunday, November 19th from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Come Saturday to purchase the best variety of homemade cookies at our ever-popular "Cookie Walk" (with 30+ members baking them, there is always an interesting selection), then browse the craft/vendor tables where you can pick out that perfect item for Holiday gift giving or decorating. Choose from artificial arrangements from Hilzinger Farms, colorful baby quilts and bibs, Christmas wreaths and ornaments, cemetery boxes, crocheted items, jewelry, homemade apple butter, jelly, relish, "Gifts in a Jar" and "Hot Chocolate Cones" from St. Anne's Pantry ( all pantry items prepared by members of the Ladies of St. Anne Society), and much, much more. Plan on dining at the "Candy Cane Cafe" (open Saturday only) where you can order homemade pea soup or corn chowder, sandwiches, hotdogs or delicious French meat pie. Before leaving, be sure to take chances on the themed Basket Raffle - the quality and value of our gift baskets are superb! (Some of the proceeds from this event help support the Ladies of St. Anne knitting ministry which knit beautiful prayer shawls that are presented to parishioners and their loved ones dealing with a serious illness.) Plenty of off-street parking in the back of the church. Just follow the signs!

Lyman Hall Craft Fair
The Lyman Hall High School Music Parents Association will host a Holiday Craft Fair on Saturday, November 18, 2006 at the school. The hours of the fair are 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Over 50 crafters will offer a full line of unique and wonderful holiday gifts. The fair will feature American Folk Artist and Best Selling author John Sliney. Dozens of homemade crafts, as well as representatives from Mary Kay Beauty Products, Pampered Chef, Princess House, Gourmet To Go, and plenty more. Concessions provided by the Music Parents Association. Free admission and parking. Interstate 91 Exit 13 and follow the signs.

ANTIQUE VETERANS FUNERAL SERVICE
The Antique Veterans of Meriden Post No 1 was organized to give military veterans an opportunity to get together for brotherly socialization. They meet every Thursday morning at the Meriden Senior Center at 9:30. There are no dues. Coffee and pastries are served. Neil’s Donut Bake Shop in Yalesville donates pastries, and ShopRite donates the ingredients for coffee. Cotton tan work clothes were selected as a uniform to wear for special occasions. A special Antique Veteran emblem is worn on the right sleeve, and the member’s military unit emblem is worn on the left sleeve. Awards and decorations are also worn. Military rank is not recognized. Performing a military salute for deceased Meriden and Wallingford veterans has become an important activity of the group.
The United States Military believes that all veterans are entitled to a final military salute at their funeral. The situation in Iraq has put stress on finding active Army and National Guard troops to perform this service. The minimum military salute calls for two flag folders, a rifle salute, and the sounding of “Taps.” The Antique Veterans of Meriden has a graveside funeral service, which has a uniformed veteran holding the American Flag at the head of the entombment site. A row of uniformed veterans holding patriotic flags is lined up in back of the American Flag. A bugler plays “Eternal Father” as the pallbearers carry the casket to the entombment site. The military salute begins when the religious ceremony is over. It starts with a 3-volley 4-gun salute. A bugler sounds “Taps” as trained flag folders fold the casket American Flag into the proper triangle. It is then formally presented to the next of kin. Then the flag bearers march off as the bugler blows the theme song of the deceased branch of service. It requires 15 to 20 veterans to properly perform this service. The State of Connecticut has formed an organization, which will pay $250 per funeral if a group meets their minimum requirements. The Antique Veterans feel that it is an honor to perform this service for deceased veterans. They elected to forego joining the Connecticut group and not accept the $250 per funeral. Since “9/11,” the Antique Veterans of Meriden have performed at 456 funeral services and 89 in 2006 as of October 24.
Funeral directors ask the deceased veteran’s next of kin if they would like a military salute at the funeral. The directors generally recommend the Antique Veterans for this salute because they think that it is the best service. Sometimes two funerals are at the same time. This requires the Antique Veterans to work out a schedule so that they can rush from one gravesite to the other.
The current membership mainly consists of WWII veterans and a few Korean War veterans. The WWII veterans are mostly in their 80s. Sickness and passing of the aged has taken a toll on the membership. Retired veterans are encouraged to join the Meriden Antique Veterans Post No 1 to fill the ranks of those who have passed. Younger retired veterans are needed to continue this community service.

SEARCH FOR OWLS, EAGLES, AND WINTERING WATERFOWL ON THE CONNECTICUT SHORELINEhttp://www.sunrisebirding.com/walks.htmGuilford, CT -- Guilford-based Sunrise Birding will offer a series of Bird Walks in the coming months to witness the southbound journeys of raptors, shorebirds, and songbirds and learn about the avian winter residents of the central Connecticut coast. Join professional guide Gina Nichol to search for the bird life in varied habitats along the Connecticut shoreline. The Bird Walk schedule is as follows:
Saturday, November 18, 2006 - 8 AM, Lower Connecticut River, Old Saybrook
Tuesday, December 12 - 3 PM, Sunset Walk at Silver Sands State Park, Milford
Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, MadisonTuesday, December 19 - 3 PM, Sunset Walk at Hammonasset State Park, Madison
Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, MadisonThursday, December 28, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, Madison The schedule includes explorations of top birding sites in Connecticut. In November, birders will be treated to a "secret" spot in Westbrook that attracts many species of migrating and wintering shorebirds. There will also be an exploration of the Lower Connecticut River in Old Saybrook, where wintering Bald Eagles and sea ducks can be seen. In December, the walks will focus on the varied habitats of Hammonasset State Park in Madison which can play host to many late fall migrants such as Northern Gannet and winter residents such as Purple Sandpiper, Lapland Longspur, Horned Lark, Hooded Merganser, Bufflehead, Surf Scoter, Sanderling, and Red-throated Loon. There is also a special Sunset Bird Walk at Silver Sands State Park in Milford to look for wintering Short-eared Owls. The fee for each walk is $5 per person, and preregistration is required. Participants are encouraged to dress for the weather and bring binoculars, water, and spotting scopes (if available). Bird checklists will be provided free to participants. Register online at http://www.sunrisebirding.com/ or by calling 203.453.6724. Sunrise Birding offers personalized, authentic, affordable travel adventures and learning opportunities intended to reveal the splendor and diversity of the natural world.

AREA CHURCHES AND ORGANIZATIONS PLAN HOLIDAY FAIRS
As always, The Peoples' Press supports YOU! If you have an event for the Holiday Season – email it to us at andy@peoplespressnews.com.

MERIDEN – The annual Franciscan Christmas Fair will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Nov. 18 at the Franciscan Life Center, 271 Finch Ave.
The event will feature a living crèche with Christmas carols, Franciscan handmade and handcrafted items, Franciscan Christmas Bread, jams, jellies, pickles. Also offered will be children’s arts and crafts, basket booth and garden booth, roasted chestnuts, wreaths and Christmas trees. Refreshments will also be available to purchase.
For information, call (203) 237-8084.
MERIDEN – Holy Angels Church will sponsor its annual holiday bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 18 at the parish center, 585 Main St., South Meriden. Crafters interested in reserving table space may call Geri at (203) 237-8697.
MERIDEN – Wilcox Technical High School will sponsor its annual arts and crafts fair from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the School on Oregon Road.
MERIDEN – Thomas Edison Middle School’s Families As Partners Organization is seeking vendors for a holiday fair scheduled from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at the school, 1355 N. Broad St.
MERIDEN – The North Italian Home Club will sponsor its annual holiday craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dec.9 at the club, 43 Thorpe Ave.
WALLINGFORD – a HARVEST AND CRAFT FAIR WILL TAKE PLACE FROM 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the Yalesville United Methodist Church, corner of Route 68 and New Place St. in Yalesville.The event will also offer breakfast and lunch.
WALLINGFORD – Zion Lutheran Church will sponsor its annual holiday fair from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the church’s Fellowship Hall, 235 Pond Hill Road.
The event will feature arts and crafts, books, toys and games, jewelry, a bake sale and apple fritters. A tag sale will be offered by the church’s youth group. A soup and sandwich luncheon will begin at 11:00 a.m. Santa will also be available for pictures.
WALLINGFORD – The Fatima Women’s Club of Our Lady of Fatima Church will sponsor a crafts fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 11 in the parish hall on Hope Hill Road, Yalesville. Crafters are needed. For information, call Sandy Comeau at (203) 269-6498.
WALLINGFORD – Rock Hill School will present its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the school on Rock Hill Road. Interested crafters may receive information or an application by calling the school at (203) 949-0115.
WALLINGFORD – Parker Farms School will sponsor its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the school on Parker Farms Road. Interested crafters may call Jodi Bouza at (203) 294-0504 or 949-0349.
WALLINGFORD – The Lyman Hall High School Music Parents Association will sponsor a holiday crafts fair on Nov. 18 at the school. All proceeds will benefit the high school’s bands and choral groups. This year’s classes are planning to perform at Disney World in Orlando, Florida.
Crafters and artisans wishing to reserve space may call Dave Baker at (203) 269-5912 for registration applications.
WALLINGFORD – The East Wallingford Volunteer Fire Department will sponsor its annual holiday craft fair from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 25 at the firehouse, 2 Kondracki Lane. A raffle and food will be available.
Crafters are needed. For information, call Robert Bonvini at (203) 269-6176 or Steve Polek at 265-6853.
WALLINGFORD – Highland School will sponsor its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dec 2 at the school on Highland Avenue.
Any crafters interest4ed in an application or for more information, call the school at (203) 949-0121 or 235-0195.
SOUTHINGTON – Plantsville Congregational Church will sponsor its 16th annual “Ye Olde Country Fair” from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the church, 109 Church St., Plantsville. The event will feature handmade crafts, homemade canned and baked goods, cookie walk, silent auction, gingerbread village, raffles, used jewelry and books and a luncheon.
For information, call (860) 628-5595.
SOUTHINGTON – Grace United Methodist Church will sponsor its annual Christmas tea and crafts sale from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at the church, 121 Pleasant St.
The event will feature knitted and craft items, unique ornaments, gift items, homemade fudge, boxed Christmas cookies, including a luncheon with tea, coffee, punch, finger sandwiches and cookies.
For information, call (860) 628-6996.
SOUTHINGTON – a Christmas bazaar will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at The Summit at Plantsville, 261 Summit St.
Table space is available for $15. Crafters, artists and holiday vendors may register by calling Pat Conlan at (860) 628-0364.
SOUTHINGTON –Crafters interested in registering for the craft fair planned to take place from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 145 Main St. are asked to complete the paperwork for submission by Nov. 18.
For registration materials, call Ann at (860) 621-0926. The fee to reserve table space is $25.
SOUTHINGTON – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church will sponsor a craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Dec. 2 in the parish hall. All interested crafters are invited to participate.
Those interested in receiving a registration form with all of the details may send their name and mailing address to Charlotte Hinckley, c/o St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 145 Main St., Southington, CT. 06489.
CHESHIRE – St. Bridget’s Church will sponsor its annual craft and Christmas bazaar from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the parish center, 175 Main St.
The event will feature crafters, baked goods, penny auction, raffles, bottles booth, teddy bear booth, and food. Santa Claus will be available from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Any crafters interested in table space may call the rectory at (203) 272-3531.
CHESHIRE – A holiday bazaar will take place from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the Cheshire Senior Center, 240 Maple Ave. The event will feature handcrafted items, baked goods, attic treasures, free face painting, costume jewelry, luncheon menu, and new toys in Santa’s Kids Corner.
For information, call the senior center at (203) 272-8286.
MERIDEN - Craft Sale by local artisans Sat. Nov. 18 from 9:00 – 2:00 at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Meriden, 328 Paddock Ave. Baskets, jewelry, knitting, weaving, hooking, dog biscuits, porcelain dolls, photos and note cards, quilting, ornaments. Bake sale. Lunch available, including roast turkey sandwiches. Free admission.Contact person: Janet Hiller 203-238-0008 or janethiller@snet.net.

NORTHFORD - FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HOLDS FALL FAIRFaith United Methodist Church of 81 Clintonville Road in North Haven will hold its annual Fall Fair on Saturday, November 18 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Fair features handmade items, a Cookie Walk where kids of all ages can fill a decorated can with homemade cookies of their choice, used jewelry, homemade baked goods, and our new church cookbook. We will also be offering homemade pies and fun activities for the kids. In our Tea Room, a full breakfast will be served from 9:00 – 11:00 a.m., and lunch will be served from 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Enter Essay Contest to Win New Playground for Hubbard Park!(Deadline is November 30th)Please help our community win a new barrier-free handicapped accessible playground for Hubbard Park! Hasbro is sponsoring an essay contest offering a $300,000 BoundlessT Playground for one grand prize winner's community, and online gift cards valued at $125 each for 20 finalist prize winners. Submit an original 500- to 750-word essay by November 30th, along with the completed entry form. One entry per family. Go to www.hasbro.com/playskool, click on In the Community/ Boundless Playground for contest rules and entry form. For more information about the new Hubbard Park Playground project email Dawn at hubbardparkplayground@peoplespressnews.com

A Night of Laughter
The Meriden Jaycees present A Night of Laughter with comedian Paul Venier. Some of the comedians Paul Venier has performed with include Jay Leno, Howie Mandel, and Paul Reiser. He has performed on The Tonight Show, HBO, and Comedy Central. Paul Venier's website is http://www.comedytornado.com/. The event will be held on Friday, Nov.24th at Il Monticello located at 577 S. Broad Street (Rte.5) in Meriden. The price is $25 per ticket and includes appetizers. A table for ten is $225. There will be a cash bar. Advanced ticket purchase is recommended. Available tickets will be sold at the door. Please contact Katie at (203) 676-2718 or Sara at (203) 464-7939 for ticket information or any questions regarding the event. The event is for people 21 and over.
The Meriden Jaycees are a group of 21- to 40-year-olds dedicated to community service and leadership development. New members are always welcomed.

Winter Concert
The MIDDLESEX HOLPITAL VOCAL CHORDS are proud and honored to present their 17th Annual Winter Concert on Saturday, December 2, 2006 at Middletown High School, 331 Hunting Hill Avenue at 7:30 p.m.
Gina Fredericks, Choral Director, has put together a musical program that will delight all who attend. Fifteen weeks of rehearsals, 75 members, two accompanists, and five instrumentalists are sure to get you in the holiday spirit!
Tickets are $15 adult; $12 for seniors and children under 12. Start a holiday tradition! Call soon as this event is always a sell-out! 860-346-8045 or 860-342-3120.

WLT Fall Cleanup
The Wallingford Land Trust will have a fall cleanup on Saturday, Nov. 18, 9:00 a.m. at two sites: Orchard Glen and Fresh Meadows I. Meet at Orchard Glen sign/kiosk off of Barnes Park North, off of Route 68. Meet at Fresh Meadows at the kiosk/cul-de-sac of Jeremy Woods Drive off of School House Road near Cook Hill School. Bring water and snacks. Work details will be in drizzle or shine, but not in hard rain. Bring tools. Wear appropriate clothing for various terrain (long pants, gloves, boots).
For more information please call Joe Palazzi at 284-2394.
Please check out the website at wallingfordlandtrust.org for more detailed information on the sites and other land trust links.


Come Join the Fun at Girls Inc. - Winter Registration is Here.Girls Incorporated of Meriden, located at 130 Lincoln Street, will begin registration for its winter classes Monday, December 4th at 9:00 a.m. Winter classes will begin on January 2nd and will be offered for 11 weeks. Girls Inc. is offering a number of programs, so be sure to check our brochure. Some of the classes being offered are Cooking, Scrapbooking, Quilting, Economic Literacy, Media Literacy, Wacky and Funky Crafts, and much more. If everything sounds like way too much fun and you don't know what to take, come join our House Sampler and try a little bit of each program. This program allows you to sample all of the above for two days over a 10-week period. Girls Inc. also has Gymnastics, Dance, Yoga, and Cheerleading. Girls Inc. has a number of exciting National Programs that will provide hands-on interactive fun learning in the areas of Science, Math and Relevant Technology, Sports and Health Fitness. The National Programs really allow the girls to get involved in subject matters that are geared just for girls. Girls Inc. is also launching Saturday classes! If you are a working parent and can't get here during the week, come and sign up for our Saturday dance or gymnastic classes! A 2006-2007 Girls Incorporated membership ($30 nonrefundable) is required to be current at time of registration. Membership and class fees are due at time of registration. Girls Inc. accepts cash, checks, MasterCard and VISA.
Girls Incorporated is a nonprofit organization that inspires all girls to be strong, smart, and bold. Girls Inc. is a premier organization that inspires girls to work to their full potential and exercise their rights through program-based curriculum. Girls Incorporated of Meriden is a United Way member agency.

Event Details:FEEDING WINTER BIRDSMonday, November 20, 2006 (Note: This is a date change from November 2.)7:00 - 8:30 p.m., Branford High SchoolERACE (East Shore Region Adult and Continuing Education) 185 East Main Street, Branford, CT 06405 Phone: 203.488.5693 Email: baeoffice@snet.net Web: http://www.erace-adulted.org/

"Christmas on the Hill " Holy Angels Holiday BazaarSaturday, November 18th, 9:00 to 3:00585 Main Street, South MeridenCrafters, Food, Baked Goods, Penny Auction, Children's Corner & a Visit from Santa! Donate a canned good for our Soup Kitchen & receive a chance for our Penny Auction.
Square dance lessons offered
Wallingford – The Cheshire Cats Square Dance Club will offer square dance lessons from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church, 360 Church St., Yalesville. For information or to register, call Barbara Brown at (203) 237-9599 or Bernice Montefusco at 269-2569.
Wallingford – Rock Hill School will present its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the school on Rock Hill Road. Interested crafters may receive information or an application by calling the school at (203) 949-0115.
Volunteer Fire Department to hold holiday fair
Wallingford – The East Wallingford Volunteer Fire Department will sponsor its annual holiday craft fair from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 25 at the firehouse, 2 Kondracki Lane. A raffle and food will be available.
Crafters are needed. For information, call Robert Bonvini at (203) 269-6176 or Steve Polek at 265-6853.
AARP Meriden Chapter 2954 will sponsor the following trip
Mohegan Sun and “A Holiday Cabaret Show” in New London, Nov. 29. Cost is $44 per person, and includes motor coach transportation; five hours at Mohegan Sun Casino; all-you-can-eat buffet or $10 food credit; $20 surprise casino bonus; 4:00 p.m. show at the Garde Arts Theatre in New London; a snack pack lunch (second meal); all taxes/service charges/tip for driver.
Call (860) 628-7717 for reservations or info. This trip is also open to the public.
Annual church fair
The women of the Middlefield Federated Church are busy getting ready for their annual Holiday Fair. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Nov. 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. for homemade goodies. Look for baked goods, Christmas decorations and gifts, jams and jellies and of course pie of every variety with your breakfast or lunch!
Crafters, call for a space
Parker Farms Annual Craft Fair, Nov. 18, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Interested crafters please contact Jodi Bouza 294-0504 or 949-0349.
Vendors still welcomed
The annual Christmas Bazaar at The Summit at Plantsville will be held Saturday, Dec. 2 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Crafters, artists, holiday vendors may call Pat Conlan at The Summit (860) 628-0364, 261 Summit St., Plantsville, or stop by to register. There is a $15 fee to reserve a table. This event includes the sale of hot dogs, chips, soda, hot chocolate, and there will be raffle prizes.
Katy’s Wallyworld Walker’s Annual Wine Tasting
You are cordially invited to Katy’s Wallyworld Walker’s Annual Wine Tasting to benefit The American Cancer Society Relay For Life 2007, Friday, Nov. 10, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Hungarian Club, 147 Ward St., Wallingford. Tickets are $20. Raffle, appetizers, and many wines. For tickets please contact: Katy Wall, 294-0675 or Amy Blakeslee 265-3117.
Antique Veterans of Meriden World Post No. 1
All honorably discharged veterans from all branches of military service are invited to come join us and take part in our activities. Coffee and pastries are provided for a small donation. There are no membership dues. Please feel free to come and visit us every Thursday morning at the Muravnick Senior Center 22-26 West Main St. Meriden at 9:30 a.m. We are open to all veterans worldwide regardless of where you reside.
For more info contact Richard Egan (203) 634-0474 or Kenneth Dow (203) 235-2120.

Connecticut Food Bank Sponsors “Thanksgiving for All” Campaign Annual Food Drives and Fundraisers to Provide Meals & Hope to Thousands of Families

Connecticut Food Bank (CFB), partnering with local media, grocery stores and businesses, has launched “Thanksgiving for All 2006,” a series of special events, food drives and fundraisers to benefit individuals and families in need of food assistance during the holiday season and the cold winter months that follow.
The turkeys and “trimmings” collected from these events will be distributed by Connecticut Food Bank to food-assistance programs in the days before Thanksgiving. The funds raised will be used to purchase additional holiday food and to pay for transporting, warehousing, and distributing the donated food.
Last year, CFB distributed 22,000 turkeys and 415,000 pounds of food, which provided an estimated 318,500 meals for people in need during the holiday season. Every event planned for the next month is critical, not only to collect food and funds, but also to increase awareness about the ongoing battle with hunger and poverty that many Connecticut residents face.
“The people of Connecticut are always very responsive to their neighbors in need. With the increasing number of people turning to food-assistance programs for help, we hope this year is no different,” says Nancy L. Carrington, Executive Director of Connecticut Food Bank. “We need to collect as many frozen turkeys and other food items as possible for families and individuals who might not have a holiday meal, or any meal, this time of year.”
“Thanksgiving for All 2006” events include:
WPLR/99.1 “Fill the Bowl” Food Drive. November 8-11. Donate a frozen turkey, four food items or $10 and receive 2 tickets for Saturday’s Yale vs. Princeton football game. WPLR will broadcast live throughout the drive. Wednesday and Thursday, 6:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.; Friday, 6:00 a.m. to midnight; Saturday, 7:00 a.m. to noon. Shop-Rite Supermarket, 1131 Campbell Avenue, West Haven.
“Fill the (Yale) Bowl” Food Drive. November 11. Presented by WPLR 99.1, WTNH/News Channel 8, Yale Athletics, and the New Haven Register. Donate a frozen turkey, four food items or $10 before the game and receive 2 tickets for that afternoon’s Yale vs. Princeton football game. 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 kickoff. Yale Bowl, 250 Derby Avenue, New Haven.
Governor’s Care & Share. November 13 - December 18. Collection sites for non-perishable food items and monetary donations at state office locations throughout Connecticut.
Bank of America “Turkey Tuesday.” November 14. Drop off frozen turkeys, non-perishable food items, and/or a monetary donation at the bank branch. 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 157 Church Street, 26th Floor, New Haven.
KC101 “Stuff A Bus” Food Drive. November 17 & 18. Donate frozen turkeys, non-perishable food items, and/or funds. KC101 will broadcast live throughout the drive. Friday, 6:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.; Saturday, 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Shaw’s Supermarket, 2100 Dixwell Avenue, Hamden.
WELI Car and Van “Caravan of Carriages” with Jerry Kristafer. November 20. 960/WELI Morning Show host Jerry Kristafer will lead a caravan of donated food from Stop & Shop on Leetes Island Road in Branford to CFB’s East Haven warehouse. Bring frozen turkeys and non-perishable “trimmings” to donate and join the caravan! Begins at 11:00 a.m.
Star 99.9 “Food for Friends” Thanksgiving Food Drive. November 21. Donate frozen turkeys and food for those in need while meeting Star 99 radio personalities at Stop & Shop Supermarket locations in Danbury, Milford, Shelton, and Westport. 5:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Also, CFB warehouses in East Haven, Fairfield, and Waterbury will have extended holiday hours to accept food and monetary donations from the public, and for volunteers to help sort and distribute food to member programs before Thanksgiving.
For event or warehouse information or to volunteer at Connecticut Food Bank, call (203) 469-5000 or visit http://www.ctfoodbank.org/.
Connecticut Food Bank serves emergency feeding programs in six of Connecticut's eight counties: Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London and Windham. In 2005, Connecticut Food Bank distributed 16.6 million pounds of food to 650 charitable food programs, including food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, and child and adult day-care programs.


Volunteer Opportunity for Meriden, Southington and Wallingford Grandparents
Meriden Children First Initiative's 'Senior Buddy Readers' intergenerational literacy program is currently seeking volunteers to help first- and second-graders improve their reading skills. If you are retired, enjoy the company of small children, and have one hour a week to help a child read, please call Children First at 630-3566. Meriden elementary schools in need of volunteers include: Ben Franklin, Israel Putnam, Thomas Hooker and Nathan Hale. Make a difference in the life of a child...become a Senior Buddy Reader!


Wallingford Public Library News and Events
Due to reconstruction, the WPL Children’s Room will not be able to offer any events. While we are not able to provide the programs we normally have, we can assure patrons that they will still be able to choose from an ever-expanding collection of books, CDs, DVDs and other materials. They will find brand-new titles as well as their old favorites and, of course, the holiday books and music. Many free booklists are available, and staff members are always happy to help find what is needed. Speaking of the approaching holiday season, the Wallingford Public Library, throughout the month of November, will be collecting new children's books for Wallingford's Holiday for Giving Program.Sincerely, Bonnie Strickland-Naczi, Children's Librarian


“Monkey bars, castles, and rainbow slides”
Hubbard Park Playground Ideas on Display at Meriden Public Library
Announcement
Come see the wonderful playground ideas dreamed up by Meriden’s school children for the New Hubbard Park Playground, in a new exhibit in the Children’s Department at the Meriden Public Library, on display until the end of November. The artwork was created at the Kids Playground Design Party at Meriden’s Autumn Fest, and captures wishes ranging from traditional playground items, such as swings, slides (straight, twisty, squiggly, rainbow, and humongous), monkey bars, seesaws, and sandboxes, to creative additions such as Ferris wheels, water slides, castles, “twisty pole ride,” and a giant starfish to climb on.
For more information about the new playground email Dawn at hubbardparkplayground@peoplespressnews.com,

About the Hubbard Park Playground Committee
Mayor Mark Benigni appointed the Hubbard Park Playground Committee in June 2004. Working as volunteers under the Meriden YMCA, the committee’s mission is to build a barrier-free playground for children of all abilities to play side by side. The Hubbard Park Playground Committee works hand in hand with Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. to make the dream of a barrier-free playground at Hubbard Park a reality.

The Connecticut ASA Hall of Fame honors Ellen Biercevicz-Piazza of Wallingford
The Connecticut ASA Hall of Fame has announced its honorees for its 2006 class of inductees for the Fast Pitch wing of the newly merged softball Hall of Fame. The Slow Pitch and Fast Pitch committees announced the merger in August.
Both the Fast Pitch and Slow Pitch honorees will be recognized at the annual Hall of Fame awards dinner on Sunday, November 19th at 4:00 p.m. at Costa Azzurra Restaurant in Milford. Tickets are $35 and can be purchased by calling Ed Austin at 203-878-4036 or Jim Consiglio at 203-996-5206.
The Fast Pitch inductees for 2006 are Anthony Candido of Milford, Pat Dufficy of Trumbull, Ellen Biercevicz Piazza of Wallingford, and Bobby Quinn. Hank Koritkoski of Middletown will receive the Joseph T. Barber Distinguished Service Award.
Piazza has been a pioneer in girls’ sports as a softball player, an initiator of girls’ sports, a high school and college coach, and an athletic director. She played for the Raybestos Brakettes from 1966-1970, and was the catcher for a quartet of pitchers that may have been the best of all time: Joan Joyce, Bertha Ragan Tickey, Donna Lopiano and Donna Hebert. During her five years with the Brakettes, she competed in the National Championship finals five times, winning two national titles.
Starting her softball coaching career at Seymour High School in 1970, Piazza later became the first softball coach at Albertus Magnus College. She also coached her daughter’s 12 & under team to State & New England Championships. Piazza has been the A.D. at Lyman Hall High School in Wallingford since 1994. She is a Shelton native.


A “Good Scout” at Castle Bank?
Larry McGoldrick, President of Castle Bank & Trust Co. in Meriden, is a recipient of the coveted "Good Scout" Award and will be honored at the 2006 Central Connecticut "Good Scout" Award Luncheon to be held on November 16th at Fantasia Banquet Facility in North Haven. Recipients are chosen for their outstanding community service as evidenced by the interest and leadership given to many worthwhile organizations as well as the respect and esteem in which they are held by their colleagues. To be a sponsor of the event (several options are available) or to reserve your seat ($100) remit payment to 2006 Central Connecticut "Good Scout" Event; CT Yankee Council, BSA, 60 Wellington Road, P.O. Box 32, Milford, CT 06460. For more information call 203-876-6868 x.241.

Tuesday, November 07, 2006

Thanksgiving in 25 years for our kids....

What can we all do to MAKE sure that our children or grandchildren still have a Thanksgiving in 25 years?

Here are some of the comments said to me this past week - Pay off THE FEDERAL and local deficits now and not later. Make sure there ARE local jobs and locally owned companies. Take care of Social Security NOW. It's about time we had Health Care for all. Renew our Downtowns and our towns. Build unity and tear down the racial walls that grow higher and higher every day. Save the earth - the earth's resources will be exhausted by the year 2050 and if you think wars over oil are bad, wait till you see what is going to happen over food and water. And to think this is only the beginning of what has been on people's minds.

Please understand that there is GOOD NEWS in what I have said and what you have to say. Why? Time - the time is now and if we act now - there will be a Thanksgiving in 25, 50, 100 years. It's time to make a sacrifice. What sacrifice are you willing to make? What sacrifice am I willing to make? As the Stone's say "Time is on our side!"

The deadline for our Thanksgiving issue is November 15th. We will be announcing A HUGE difference a group has made for Central Connecticut and do they deserve thanks. I also will be sending thanks to the people who never hear it, how about you? It only takes a moment to make a special moment in someone's life. Send a heartwarmer, save a life, share a life, and maybe even send a greeting or recipe.

Believe! Believe in change. Because The People's Press believes in you. - Andy

Upcoming Deadlines for our Holiday Issues

Hi all, the 2006 Holiday Issue deadlines are listed below. We have 3 to serve your needs in this most festive time of year. If you have any questions don't hesitate to call me at 203.235.9333 or email me at andy@peoplespressnews.com. You can also find out what we are about at www.peoplespressnews.com. We are honored to be the NUMBER 1 Single Copy Newspaper serving Wallingford, Meriden and all of Central Connecticut.
Early Decemember Issue is November 26th
Holiday Magic Issue is December 9th
A New Year...A New You - January issue is January 5th.

Thanks you all so very much for your kind words. They encourage us to move onward. Andy

Monday, November 06, 2006

Bonus Extra Issue Early November ONLINE

As you were aware, we had some press problems with our last issue so we decided to do an extra issue right away. We would not have it any other way. We will be back to our regular schedule for the Thanksgiving issue which has a deadline of November 15th. Come Home for the Holidays with The People's Press and BELIEVE! We have 4 Holiday Issues to celebrate our hometowns, our lives and our beliefs. I hope you will be a part of the magic of faith, no matter what your faith is. Peace - Andy

Early Nov. 2006 Stories

Bobbie’s Bevy of Beauties
By Friday afternoon whatever life was left in the remaining flowers was gone. Thursday night’s frosty attack did its damage. Even the beautiful dahlias and their many buds couldn’t defend themselves against the cold of that night. Within the next week or two the dahlia tubers will be dug up, placed in large aluminum pans filled with peat moss and placed in the cellar next to the calla lilies. The rose bushes will be trimmed to about 1 – 1 ½ feet. And the peat moss piled around them. The remaining perennials cut down and the annuals dug up and disposed of. What a sad looking sight the yard will be.
For about a month now, every few days Jimmy would pick his green tomatoes and put them on the kitchen counter. As they ripened, into the refrigerator drawer they would go. So that great tomato sandwich is still available to me maybe for another two weeks anyway.
Even though our cats are loved members of our family, not having our long-haired dachshund, Tahrah with us left a very big void in our household. LitlBit has come to live with Bobbie, Jimmy, Kea, Deenee and Scooch. This little guy is a mini long-haired. All our others were standard size. A mini dachshund is 10 lbs. and under. The standard any weight over 10 lbs. He has various shades of brown along with some black, is three months old and 5 ½ lbs. So beautiful and affectionate. Loves everyone including other dogs and cats. It has been many years since I’ve had to housebreak a dog. I’ve almost forgotten what the word sleep means. Considering we’ve had him for only a couple weeks, he’s doing very well. Almost hate to say that because I’m afraid I might jinx myself. Believe it or not I just did. As I wrote that statement he “wee-weed.” Have to remember LitlBit is still a baby and will have an “Accident” now and then. Doing crate training, and recommend it very highly.
My hibernation plans will have to wait for a while. Have to have some minor surgery. Once everything is squared away, I’ll return to last year’s bed under the park bench at the end of the backyard. Since I won’t be around and catching up on my lost sleep, I wish my husband luck with the rest of housebreaking and training of LitlBit. If March turns out to be a nasty month like it was this year, I’ll stay put until April.
So until spring 2007,
Flowercerly yours,
Bobbie G. Vosgien

My 22nd Birthday
By Priscilla Reynolds
Sometimes in the middle of the night I wake up knowing what has to be done. Other times I awaken knowing there is nothing I can do. Anxiety sets in and wishes become prayers.
My grandson, Chris, came home on furlough last week. We're all proud of him. He is now ranked as Lance Corporal in the US Marine Corps. He served some time in Iraq, and now is stationed at Cherry Point, North Carolina.
During dinner out at Bill's Seafood in Clinton, he and his girlfriend chatted with his family and Uncle Matt and me. He corrected me about his age, "No, Gram, I'm still 21; I'll celebrate my 22nd birthday in Iraq." Everyone at the table knew that Chris was scheduled to return to Iraq in February. I speak for myself when I say that the combination of his young age and returning to Iraq sent a shiver up my spine. I am aware that Chris is a brave young man and, I, 53 years older, pray for this war to end; for God to give us peace, and for Chris to come home.
Some of the hymns I listen to at night help. Here's one of them:
"There'll be Peace in the Valley for Me"
Well, I'm tired and so weary, but I must go on
Till the Lord comes and calls me, calls me away. Oh yes!
Well, the morning is night; the lamb is the light;
And the night is as fair as the day; Oh yes!
There will be peace in the valley for me someday.
There will be peace in the valley for me, Oh Lord I pray!
There'll be no sadness, no sorrow, My Lord,
No trouble I see
There will be peace in the valley for me--for me.
Well, the bear will be gentle; And the wolf will be tame;
And the lion shall lay down with the lamb, Oh yes!
And the beast in the wild will be led by a little child
And there'll be change, change from this creature that I am.
There will be peace in the valley for me someday.
There will be peace in the valley for me-for me.
There'll be no sadness, no sorrow, My Lord,
No trouble, no trouble I see,
There will be peace in the valley for me- for me!




My Dad, George Vumback
By Gina Maurizio
I would absolutely like to pay tribute to my dad, George Vumback. He was a WWII veteran. This was well before I was born and a different time in the world. From what I was told, my father was newly married in 1942 when he enlisted and left my mother and sister for overseas. My mom referred to herself as a war widow, and she had many girlfriends and relatives who were also young and alone with small children while their husbands were off fighting. My father was an ex-POW after being MIA (like most were at first). He was captured in Bad Orb Germany. When his camp was liberated, he weighed only 90 pounds and had pleurisy. His recovery was long as he struggled to gain his strength back. My father also received the Purple Heart because he almost lost his legs to frostbite. His limbs were never the same after that, and he was also a disabled vet. This occurred during the Battle of the Bulge. The stories he would occasionally reveal usually left us chilled and sorrowful. I always felt sad how he was starved and mistreated. I was also aware that he was lucky to come home at all because many men did not.
He was very active in veteran affairs all his life, and represented ex-POWs from Connecticut at a national convention in Colorado in 1982. His name is included in the WW II memorial in Washington D.C., and he had lobbied at the nation's capitol for veterans rights in the 1970s. He said the young ones (Vietnam veterans at the time) needed our support. At the Veterans Day ceremonies he laid the black wreath at the monuments on Broad Street .My dad placed flags on graves of soldiers and always marched in Meriden's Parades wearing his maroon and gold uniform (Ex-POW colors).
All his four children are extremely proud of the sacrifices he made for his country. He has been deceased almost 16 years now. Cancer developed on the scar tissue that remained on his lung from the pleurisy all those years before .He had always told us to take a moment of silence for all veterans on the eleventh month, on the eleventh day, and at the eleventh hour. D-Day. You will find me standing still at this time on Veterans Day. Wherever I may be, I stop. I have a feeling that wherever my two brothers and sister are that they, too, will remember. It is something we always did. A special thank you to all Veterans.


My pants…
Here’s a story that is true, I think funny, too. Normally I wouldn’t write this because I’ve always been shy until I hit my 40s. People, especially people of senior citizen age, say, When you get older, you get bolder. It’s a senior’s privilege. Ha, even though I’m of the younger senior’s age and don’t feel anything over 35, it still counts. Here goes.
Upon being new to Wallingford, most of my doctors – of all kinds - are down in the New Haven area, from where I am originally. Being of Italian and Polish descent I come from the Wooster Street (Little Italy) area. Well, little by little I’ve been getting new doctors – and one is a new dentist. Being that I take a bus, I needed an appointment after work and somewhere close to home. I found one and made an appointment. It turned out to be a very rainy day – lightning and thunder. A co-worker of mine said she would take me home. Great for me. I must also add it was very humid out. We had to walk a quarter mile to get to her car. Of course with that we were both sweaty. Upon entering her car I noticed a stain on her seat (passenger side of course) and me with white pants. I said to myself it should be all right. The stain looked as though it had been there for a while – no problem???? We go to the dentist office, and I had to do the norm – fill out all those papers. They called me in, and two people were in the room – the dentist and her assistant. The dentist asked me questions and proceeded to do her thing of drilling and filling. Between these procedures I had to keep leaning over many times to rinse out my mouth. After 20 minutes I was done. I said thank you, see you again, and left. My friend drove me home. I couldn’t wait to change my clothes. To my surprise there was this big brown spot on my white pants – you know where. It looked like I --------- my pants. My face reddened with embarrassment. I could just imagine what the dentist and her assistant thought when I kept leaning over. What a first impression I made.
Jo-Ann Buccetti, Wallingford, Ct.


He was my Dad...Fred Sunn.
By Audrey Dibbern
I'm sorry to say that my dad was killed in a horrific auto accident on the Hartford Turnpike in Yalesville on August 27th, 1965. That was before computers, so there are no pictures I can electronically send to you, but, you're right...I can speak of him and his contribution to the armed services, his country, his friends, and most of all his family.
Dad married my mom, a widow with two small daughters, and struggled financially in order for the family to survive. In the midst of the struggle, his country called him into service, so with a heavy heart he left mom to be alone again with the two small daughters she loved and cared for. Dad served his time on U.S. soil, maintaining the same American aircraft that won the war, and when it was over, he returned home to his bride and the two beautiful little girls he had come to love as his very own. The marriage thrived and the two daughters became four daughters, and the family thrived. My dad was a bright, jovial fella, loaded with personality and warmth. People were naturally drawn to him for those reasons and more. He was generous, kind, and a dreamer. He never stopped wanting more for his family, and spent his life sacrificing his own pleasures and desires in order to accommodate the needs and wants of others. His friends gathered around his soft spirit and quick wit for company and a sympathetic ear. He never failed to share what he had with others, and joyfully extended himself and his bounty to friends and neighbors alike.
Dad carried his love of God, country, family and friends to the end when he was tragically killed in an auto accident caused by irresponsible teenaged children and their drunk driving. At 17 I lost that wonderful man from my life, who taught me everything I knew. He left us with aching, heavy hearts, lonely and lost, yet proud of him, his sense of duty, and his lifelong accomplishments. He was a wonderful man. He was my Dad...Fred Sunn.



What Veteran’s Day means to me.A day for heroes who gave their lives for their country so we may remain free, and for those who fought beside them who still should be honored today. In honor of Frank J. O'Brien. Frankie left us in December 1954. He was a paratrooper with the Naval Parachute Unit, U. S. Naval Auxiliary Air Station, El Centro, California.He was killed when the parachute he was testing failed to open. He had made many parachute jumps, all involving testing of experimental equipment. The bravery and courage it took making those jumps will always be an inspiration to those who had the opportunity to serve with him and those who followed. He will never be forgotten for the work he did that hashelped others to be safe. The day we received the news about his death was horrifying to his parents and his siblings. He left us when I was just a young teenager in 1954, but he will always be in our hearts. Frank has two brothers and three sisters who still live in Meriden. His parents and brothers have left us also,but I believe they are all together in Heaven. We just want to say how very much Frankie is still missed andloved always. Thanks, Frankie, for a job well done for your part in keeping our country safe. I can't imagine how hard it must have been for you to leave your family and friends and go to other parts of the world, but this is what you chose, and you were so proud to serve your country while in the Navy, and we were as proud of you also. I sit here writing about you so many years later and tears still flow for my brother. We never had a chanceto say good-bye. Then I smile remembering all the letters I wrote to you when I was so young and missing you. I just want whoever reads this article to know how much we loved him and are still missing him. Your sister Audrey and sisters Muriel and Elinor. Brothers George and Ed.



A Sister’s Tribute to her brother Sgt. Robert L. Miglierina Died October 10, 1968, in Vietnam

I'll pay a tribute to my brother my dear,But oh how I wish you were still here.The memories of you are all I have,That keeps me going along life's path.I see your smile in the depths of my mind.You were truly unique, bright, handsome and kind.You gave your life so I may live free.I can never repay what you did for me.You will always be my shining starWay up in the heavens, so very far.One day we will meet again face to face.Then we'll be together in God's heavenly place. Ruth Miglierina Petrucci


Dear Housewives – Central Connecticut’s Know it all Gals
Dear Readers,Thank you for taking the time to read our column. You are welcome to contact The People’s Press (can be anonymous) by email or fax with questions regarding: family life, budgeting, organizing, DVD or Book reviews or anything that you need an outsider’s influence. Thanks Readers!!! Your Housewives, June and FloraDear Housewives, I am a new mother of twins. I am so overwhelmed because I can't get anything done in my house. If one baby is sleeping, the other is up and vice versa. I have a lot of friends and family who offer help, but I feel strange having them wait on me while I sit there and watch. Should I let them anyway?Double trouble in MeridenJUNE: Dear double, why don't you have a cleaning party? Get all those who want to help to come over and clean and cook for you. You can order lunch for everyone (on you of course) and just relax and enjoy your babies. You won't feel awkward because there will be several people there which will take the focus off you just watching. When you are
past the difficult stage of babies, you can go out and buy everyone a small token of your appreciation. Good luck and enjoy.Flora: June, that is a terrific idea! A cleaning party is a great way to show a new Mom in your life that you care. Too many new mothers do not take the offerings from others. I wish the super mom mentality would go away. It is okay to sit with your babies to hug and feed them. You don't have to have everything in order in the home. When friends or family ask what they can do: Be Honest. Tell them that going to the grocery store, doing laundry for a few weeks, or washing the dishes would be helpful. The Cleaning party should be the new trend. Double Trouble: please let your loved ones help you. Congratulations on your babies.Dear Housewives, My son wants to be a violent looking guy for Halloween, complete with knives and a gun. I am totally against any of that sort of thing, but my husband says let him be what he wants. Should I tell him to pick something else anyway? Freddy Kruger’s mom in WallingfordFLORA: I think if you really are against it, have him select something extra special without the weaponry. If he is under 6, I say no way.JUNE: Dear Freddy's mom, you should get a grip or you will have to go out as a neurotic, obsessive-compulsive control freak for Halloween. It is just a costume that he will wear on a night that there are a thousand scary stupid costumes with daggers and guns. You do know he can see knives in your kitchen and guns on TV, right? He won't become as ax murderer because of his costume nor will he become a crazed maniac just because he looks like one while trolling for candy. There are some things to draw the line on, and this isn't one of them. ENTERTAINMENT:JUNE: Hi Flora, we rented the movie "End Game" with Cuba Gooding Junior. It was the worst movie I have seen in a while. It was a “murder the president who dunnit” kind of uh thriller? Thriller it was not, and the script was only overshadowed by the bad acting. Hey, Cuba, get a new agent because since you won the Oscar, the roles you are picking aren't good. Also, thanks, Flora, for your visit to see us and our new baby. Thanks for washing my floor. Mr. June and I realized what we need for Christmas this year: An Alice. You know, from the Brady Bunch (one of my formerly favorite shows). Alice was perfect. She wasn't really part of the family, so she had no real say or right to butt into family business. She had a room way far away from the others. She wore a uniform so everyone knew she wasn't part of the family. And, while she was a handsome woman, Mr. Brady wasn't going to be taking up with her any time soon. Alice, the perfect solution to my busy household. FLORA: Some seasonal good reads are: "The Christmas Shoes," The Christmas Blessing," and "The Christmas Hope," all by Donna Van Liere. June, it was my pleasure to help you out. How timely with this month’s first question. And yes, we all need an Alice! I, too, was a Brady Bunch fan. I also liked: The Flintstones, The Munsters, Land of the Lost, Scooby Doo, The Jetsons, and Little House on the Prairie.



A Personal Note
Hi, Andy. I never was deployed, and most of my experience was in training. Constantly training. I went to Anchorage, Alaska after the Big Earthquake, and brought supplies there. My best experience was doing volunteer work with the Tacoma Community House, helping Asian refugees to resettle in the Seattle area. I entered into the Air Force after the end of the Vietnam War. My best friend from West Haven was blown up by a land mine. His name was Aldo Doria. He was a happy-go-lucky guy. We were friends in high school. I used to lift weights with him after school at my house. He was a greenhorn from Italy. Great Kid. Grati, John DiBiase Jr.


NATURE AS A MIRROR
IVY
Glossy ivy vine,
Potted on my windowsill.
Nature brought inside.
Recently while my 11-year-old granddaughter, Ivy Ciaburri, was painting this illustration, I looked for information about the vine Ivy. We found that ‘Ivy’ is a generic name for any vine that climbs or creeps as it grows. There are different botanical names for each variety of the vine.
The leaves of the Common or English Ivy are a glossy, waxy green and have five points on each leaf. The flowers are quite inconspicuous. It clings to shady walls and sides of buildings from cottages to castles with its fine air roots. The Boston or Japanese Ivy has three points on each leaf, and it, too, often covers the shady sides of buildings. When the ivy vines entwine a tree for support, there is the possibility that as the tree grows in girth, the vine will strangle it.
The Virginia Creeper, has five leaflets, and is often mistaken for Poison Ivy that has three shiny green leaflets. The oil in the poison ivy leaves often cause itching and blisters on our skin, if we touch it. All ivies turn scarlet and brighten pathways in the fall. On our hikes through the countryside, the scarlet leaves warn us to beware, ‘Leaflets three, Let it be.’
There is also Ground Ivy, otherwise called gill-over-the-ground or Creeping Charlie. This creeping ivy has rounded leaves and purple or blue flowers. As it creeps along the ground, it sends rootlets into the soil anchoring the vine. It was imported many years ago and was made into cough syrup and ale. At one time, gardeners grew it, but today it we usually do not welcome it in our gardens.
The Bittersweet vine grows in moist areas. The tiny flowers become clusters of poisonous berries in the fall. Their green color changes to yellow, and finally opens to expose the crimson seed. The orange-red berries remain on the vine stems through the winter and are favored for winter bouquets and decorations. The twigs of the bittersweet vine produce a liquid that is used in medicine to relieve pain and treat skin diseases.
These ivy vines with varied uses and characteristics have weak and flexible stems that need support; otherwise they creep along the ground. There are times in our lives when we need support, ‘less our spirits wither, seemingly in the dust. There are many lovely blooms, such as wisteria, morning glory, honeysuckle, clematis that we admire that depend on sturdy support to reach their glory. It seems as if God has allowed all things (even us) to lack something, but, nevertheless, all things have a purpose in life that adds richness to the world.


Marines in the Mist
By Dennis Mannion
In February of 2000, I began the process of making plans for a return to Khe Sanh and in particular Hill 861. The trip was scheduled for early July 2000 and would last approximately 14 days. In April of that year, I was in church for Palm Sunday mass, and acting on a hunch, I grabbed an extra handful of blessed palm as I headed out the door to my car. At home I cut off the flimsy ends of the palm and what I had left were rigid pieces of palm about 20 inches long. I cut those strips into pieces about 3 inches in length. I then used a magic marker to write in the names of 28 Marines and corpsman [who I personally knew who had died in Vietnam] with one name on each piece. In addition I wrote down the date of their deaths. I wrapped all 28 sections of palm in a plastic bag and included them with my gear for the trip.
The trip(s) up to 861 took place over a 3-day period and for the rest of this report, I’ll use Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3. The main focus of this paper is Day 3, but I need to cover the first two days as well.
Day 1 – up early for the departure to 861. We rode out past the old combat base in our rented van. Passengers – other than me - included KS vets Paul Knight (861) and his son Todd, Bob Arrotta (881s), Glenn Prentice (881s), Dave Kniess (my former student), Donna Elliott (searching for info on her MIA brother), and our Vietnamese translator. We stopped the van at a point where the trail to 861 looked promising. It seemed to be in the very area that Kilo had used back on December 26, 1967, to go to 861. We headed out under scattered clouds and spitting rain. It took almost four hours for the lead group (Glenn, Bob, Dave, and I) to get onto 861. The stragglers arrived within an hour of that, so that by noon all of us were on the hill. We pitched three tents near the old CP bunker, but the wind picked up and the rain really began to pelt us. I paid little attention to the weather as I had no trouble finding my old bunker! I spent over an hour cutting all the fresh growth away so I could expose the actual hole I lived in 33 years before. By mid-aft one of the tents had collapsed, one was leaking badly (my 20-year-old, two-man backpacking tent), and there was nothing to see or do. Half the group left for a return to the old combat base area and our primitive, government owned “guest house.” Dave, fearing for his very expensive video camera was one of those who left. I stayed, along with Bob and Glenn and our interpreter. The 4 of us spent a miserable night in a tent that really was designed for 2 or 3 at the most!
Day 2 In the morning of Day2, the weather was worse. The winds were a constant 50 to 60 mph and the cold rain was driven sideways across the top of the hill. Literally, one could not see beyond 15 feet. Leaving some food and supplies in the tent, we traced our steps back down to KS ville and arrived by noon. We were arrested for being on the hills without a permit and for camping overnight (a big No-No there), and the police took our passports! They said that we would have to pick them up in the late afternoon of day 3 in Dong Ha (26 miles away). After some discussions with the local cops, Bob and Glenn got permission to try to get to 881s on the morning of Day 3. He agreed to let them go if they signed the proper forms. [Our original intent was to sleep on 861 and then travel on foot over to 881s, sleep there, and then return to the village on the morning of Day 3.] I spoke up and asked for permission to go back to 861 in order to retrieve our one good tent. Forms were signed for Dave and me, and that night we packed up for a second return to 861.

Day3 Dave and I awoke at around 3:30 a.m. We had made arrangements for two local kids to give us rides on their motorbikes back to the spot where the trail to 861 left the old combat base road. It was raining fairly well but the wind had died down. In the dark, I lost track of Dave’s driver and their bike. 10 minutes later, I was at the trail junction but without Dave. [What I did not know (and would not know till late in the afternoon), was that Dave’s driver had stopped for gas, and Dave, sensing that the rain would be bad for his camera, directed the kid back to the guest house.] I waited for 15 minutes, paid the kid a dollar, strapped on my pack and turned for 861 alone. I had no trouble getting up there; in fact, with less weight and no tent to lug, it took just over three hours. I stopped only once – by a large tree on Hill 700 – for water and a granola bar. In some places, I could see the tracks and boot prints made by us going up 48 hours earlier and by some of us coming back down just 24 hours earlier. By 7:30 in the morning, I was on the LZ of 861 and I was totally alone! Amazingly, the rain stopped, and while the sun never came out, it was easy to see over to the other ridgelines. For the next 4 hours it was just me, the mist, the memories, and the history of the hill. I felt awfully privileged to be walking around a place of so much pain, blood, and sacrifice. The only sound to break the silence was an occasional bird chirp and my talking aloud. I walked the entire trench line, visited my old bunker again (where I had cut down all the vegetation two days earlier), and dug a bit in the dirt. I found an old C-rat spoon, some barbed wire, part of a USMC flak jacket, and the fin assembly of an NVA 82 mortar. I knew that I had to be off the hill by noontime because the van was going to leave KS (for Dong Ha) by 3:00 p.m., so when it was time to go, I thought of the blessed palms in my pocket. I lugged my gear (and the “new” stuff from the hill) down to the LZ. I returned to the top of the hill, and right between my bunker and the old CP bunker, I took out the palms. Speaking at the top of my voice, I said an Our Father and a Hail Mary. Then, one palm at a time, I read the name aloud and said, “May God have mercy on your soul.” As I let each piece go, the breeze caught them and sent them in various directions. After 28 names (and a few tears on my part), I returned to the LZ. As I bent over my pack to tighten things up for travel, I looked back to the top of the hill. I was stunned to see a group of figures – 15 to 20 – standing in a loose formation/group at the top of the hill. They had helmets and flak jackets and the wind moved their clothing and the ponchos that some of them were wearing! I blinked, looked away, looked back, and they were still there looking down at me. I started to cry and in a loud voice, I asked them to watch over my family and all my friends. No matter how many times I looked away, they continued to stand and look down. Finally, I picked up my pack, saluted the entire group, turned my back to them, crossed the LZ, and dropped off into the elephant grass below. I never looked back again.
Six years later: it has been over 4 years since that moment and I have not been the same person since. ( Dennis Mannion - Sept, 2004 )



Rosie the Riveter: A Brief Look at Women’s Roles in WWII
By C.S. Purcell
“This is not a time when women should be patient. We are in a war and we need to fight it with all our ability and every weapon possible.” - Eleanor Roosevelt, 1942
When you open the door to my library, you see the reproduction wartime posters of “Rosie the Riveter” and a Navy recruitment poster with a young girl in a sailor’s suit, saying, “Gee, I wish I were a man. I’d join the Navy.” I use these posters to deliberately set the tone of my room, of my attitude, because it is a place where I read, write and create. Rosie was strong, yet beautiful. The girl in the Navy poster wanted to be like her big brother who went forth proudly to serve. The women who served in wartime, in one way or another, have made it possible for my voice to be heard – and to be taken seriously.
We can think of women’s roles in many different wars, but World War II has a place in my heart. It was a time when our country overtly called for women to step forward and help this nation. And they did.
Before the United States entered World War II, several companies already had contracts with the government to produce war equipment for the Allies. Almost overnight the United States entered the war and war production had to increase dramatically in a short amount of time. Auto factories were converted to build airplanes, shipyards were expanded, and new factories were built, and all these facilities needed workers. But as companies were signing large, lucrative contracts with the government, our American men were leaving for war.
Who would fill their place? Women.
We know that women have always worked, especially minority and lower-class women. But the mindset of the country at the time placed white middle-class women in the home and men in the workforce. Even most women saw their place at home, caring for the children and tending to their husbands. Employers were used to men in their factories.
The United States government had to overcome these challenges in order to recruit women into the workforce. The government decided to launch a propaganda campaign to sell the importance of the war effort and to lure women into working. In this propaganda effort, Rosie the Riveter was born. She flexed her muscles and exclaimed, “We Can Do It!”
Millions of American women helped assemble bombs, build tanks, weld hulls and grease locomotives. More than 6 million women became war workers. Most were married and a third had children under 14. A popular song of the day praised "Rosie the Riveter" in verse: "That little frail can do/more than a male can do."
Money during the war was tight in many households, and the women, by working, had the opportunity to make wages. But on average, women war workers were paid only 60 percent of male wages. Many faced harassment and were judged by prevailing social attitudes.
While the image of the woman worker was important during the war, the prewar image of women as wives and mothers did not disappear. Mainstream society accepted temporary changes brought about by a war, but considered them undesirable on a permanent basis. Indeed, you cannot take the jobs permanently away from the men who were called to duty, although so many men never returned home. After the war, the cultural division of labor by sex reasserted itself. Employers forced many women who wanted to remain in the workforce back into lower-paying “female” jobs. Most women were laid off and told to go back to their homes.
To appease those opposed to women in the workforce, the government insisted that "Rosie the Riveter" was a temporary response to war. "A woman is a substitute," claimed a War Department brochure, "like plastic instead of metal."
Other homefront wartime jobs for women included recruiting, typing, and selling war bonds.
Although the famous image of Rosie the Riveter reminds us of women working here on American soil, women also joined the military, helping with a number of positions, including nursing, chemical lab assistants, photographic lab assistants, radio repair, cartography, modelmakers, field photographers… The military had developed its own propaganda posters for recruiting women. The Women’s Army Corps’ message was, "Woman’s place in war! The Army of the United States has 239 kinds of jobs for women."
And we can’t forget The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) of World War Two, 1942-1944, who paved the way for women in the Airforce and other armed services. During World War II 1,078 young women pilots became an inspiration to women – to Americans. They were the first women in history trained to fly American military aircraft.
It was a big deal - women coming into the workforce in droves to fill the gaps left by enlisted or recruited male soldiers and women serving the armed forces in WWII. Today it is not unusual. Women enlist in the armed forces, are deployed to the warfront with men, and, yes, work in the factories that produce military equipment.
Whenever I look at my wartime reproduction posters, I think of how far we have come. We don’t need Rosie to remind women that “We can do it!” I laugh when I see the young girl pulling on her Navy suit, wishing she were a man. The Navy used a young girl to tell those not yet enlisted to “be a man.” Now, the Navy calls upon men and women alike. In the modern-day armed forces’ propaganda of TV commercials, there are women. In the news, we hear of our men and women who serve in Operation Enduring Freedom.
Women are no longer considered mere replacements. We are not plastic. We are part of the fabric – one stronger than metal – that holds this country together.


A Letter Home

Jan 18, 1944
Dear Brother,
Longtime for me to finally get around to expressing my appreciation for the Christmas packages, but believe me, it isn’t because I have already enjoyed them or that I haven’t been thinking and thanking you, but oh boy, you know how it is when you get into a writing slump.
Although I had a swell holiday and we had turkey and 2 cases of beer, the season kinda got me down a bit and as is the case with all here, the correspondence suffered. Now we seem to be back to normal and I am going to get on the ball and try to let people know how much I enjoyed everything.
19th
Well, I start lots of things around here, but also have plenty questions to answer, so that accounts for the many interruptions. It is now 3:30 and the gang is on fatigue, fixing paths, cutting brush, etc. Spent the morning on the range trying out new firing stunts with our mortars and they work swell and didn’t even get a sore hand. So we will go to work on it hammer and tongs, so that next time we’ll be able to throw everything but the sink at them before they know what’s happening.
The weather has been quite a bit cooler – when you sit in the shade, but probably because of so much rain. It hasn’t rained today yet and didn’t rain all last nite. First time in a couple weeks, and my blankets smell like toad stools – so must get those aired out. Tojo hasn’t bothered us with bombings but twice in a month, but not good definitely - but I can still tell when they’re coming close, so that’s all that counts.
A few more days till my birthday and believe me I am getting along. Sometimes feel as old as I am, but still can muck along with the rest of them. Have also been executive of the Battalion for quite a time and supposed to serve in this capacity for 3 months, before getting an advance to field grade. Hope by that time to get to New Zealand for a rest before the next bugle. I can sure stand putting an a few pounds so that I don’t rattle. This place is sure changed – Hope I can get some pictures of it and send them home. Flossy should receive a few that might be of interest.
Well must close and get to work for awhile. Thanks again for the packages and for remembering us.
Hope you are all well.
Love to all,
Don
Major Donald T. Robison served as Meriden’s Park Superintendent from 1938 until 1941 when the Connecticut National Guard in which he served as a second lieutenant was inducted into the war. Upon entering the Army he was promoted to first lieutenant and about a year later to Captain and placed in command of Company D from Meriden. He reached the rank of Major about two months after writing the letter transcribed above. On August 7th of the same year, the 34-year-old major was seriously wounded in action in New Guinea. He died six days later. A small monument is located at Hubbard Park honoring Major Robison’s service to Meriden and his ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.

Military Funeral Honors "Honoring Those Who Served"
The Department of Defense (DOD) is responsible for providing military funeral honors. "Honoring Those Who Served” is the title of the DOD program for providing dignified military funeral honors to veterans who have defended our nation.
Upon the family's request, Public Law 106-65 requires that every eligible veteran receive a military funeral honors ceremony, to include folding and presenting the United States burial flag and the playing of Taps. The law defines a military funeral honors detail as consisting of two or more uniformed military persons, with at least one being a member of the veteran's parent service of the armed forces. The DOD program calls for funeral home directors to request military funeral honors on behalf of the veterans' family. However, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Cemetery Administration cemetery staff can also assist with arranging military funeral honors at VA national cemeteries. Veterans’ organizations may assist in providing military funeral honors. When military funeral honors at a national cemetery are desired, they are arranged prior to the committal service by the funeral home.
The Department of Defense began the implementation plan for providing military funeral honors for eligible veterans as enacted in Section 578 of Public Law 106-65 of the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2000 on Jan. 1, 2000.
Questions or comments concerning the DOD military funeral honors program may be sent to the address listed below. The military funeral honors Web site is located at www.militaryfuneralhonors.osd.mil
Department of DefenseDirectorate for Public Inquiry and AnalysisRoom 3A750, The PentagonWashington, DC 20301-1400
To arrange military funeral honors, contact your local funeral home.

Burial Benefits – Burial Flags
Why does VA provide a Burial Flag?
The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) provides a U.S. flag at no cost, to drape the casket or accompany the urn of a deceased veteran who served honorably in the U. S. armed forces. It is furnished to honor the memory of a veteran’s military service to his or her country. Section 517 of Public Law 105-261 added eligibility for former members of the Selected Reserve.
Who is eligible to receive the Burial Flag?
Generally, the flag is given to the next-of-kin as a keepsake after its use during the funeral service. When there is no next-of-kin, VA will furnish the flag to a friend making a request for it. For those VA national cemeteries with an Avenue of Flags, families or friends of veterans buried in these national cemeteries may donate the burial flags of their loved ones to be flown on patriotic holidays.
How do I apply?
You may apply for the flag by completing VA Form 21-2008, Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes . You may get a flag at any VA regional office or U.S. Post Office. Generally, the funeral director will help you. . When burial is in a national, state or military post cemetery a burial flag will be provided. To contact the VA regional office, call 1-800-827-1000.
Can a Burial Flag be replaced?
The law allows one flag for a veteran’s funeral. It cannot be replaced it if it is lost, destroyed, or stolen. However, some veterans’ organizations or other community groups may be able to help you get another flag.
How should the Burial Flag be displayed?
The proper way to display the flag depends upon whether the casket is open or closed. VA Form 21-2008 provides the correct method for displaying and folding the flag. The burial flag is not suitable for outside display because of its size and fabric. It is made of cotton and can easily be damaged by weather.
For More Information Call Toll-Free at 1-800-827-1000

Presidential Memorial Certificate
A Presidential Memorial Certificate (PMC) is an engraved paper certificate, signed by the current President, to honor the memory of honorably discharged deceased veterans.
History
This program was initiated in March 1962 by President John F. Kennedy and has been continued by all subsequent Presidents. Statutory authority for the program is Section 112, Title 38, of the United States Code.
Administration
The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) administers the PMC program by preparing the certificates which bear the current President’s signature expressing the country’s grateful recognition of the veteran’s service in the United States Armed Forces.
Eligibility
Eligible recipients include the deceased veteran’s next-of-kin and loved ones. More than one certificate may be provided.
Application
Eligible recipients, or someone acting on their behalf, may apply for a PMC in person at any VA regional office or by U.S. mail only. Requests cannot be sent via email. There is no form to use when requesting a PMC. Please be sure to enclose a copy of the veteran's discharge and death certificate. Please submit copies only, as we cannot return original documents.
If you would like to request a Presidential Memorial Certificate, or if you requested one more than eight weeks ago and have not received it yet, either:
1. Fax your request and all supporting documents (copy of discharge and death certificate) to: (202) 565-8054, or
2. Mail your request and all supporting documents using either the U.S. Postal Service or a commercial mail service, such as one of the overnight or express mail delivery services, to:
Presidential Memorial Certificates (41A1C)Department of Veterans Affairs5109 Russell RoadQuantico, VA 22134-3903
If you have any questions about a certificate you have received, a request you have already sent in, or about the program in general, you may call (202) 565-4964. Or you may send an electronic inquiry to us by selecting the “Contact the VA” link below.
PLEASE NOTE: The above telephone number is for questions about the Presidential Memorial Certificate Program only.
Veteran Service Officers and Funeral Homes - Please contact us at (202) 565-4259 or (202) 501-2004 for information about submitting requests electronically.
We do not administer other VA programs or have access to other VA records. For assistance with other VA benefits or records please use the “Contact the VA” link below. Or call your regional office at:
1-800-827-1000

Meriden and Wallingford Town News and Events Early Nov. 2006

MAX E. MURAVNICK MERIDEN SENIOR CITIZENS’ CENTER
Meteorologist Art Horn will again visit the Senior Center to put on his latest weather show, “Weather, People and Health”. Art’s fun and informative show will be on Wednesday, November 8 from 10:30 - 11:30 AM in the first floor meeting room. His 45 minute slide show will cover such topics as how weather and climate affects people, the impact of summer heat waves, the depletion of the ozone layer, weather and allergies and how weather affects all aspects of our daily lives. Following his slide show Art will conduct a 10 to 15 minute question and answer session. Be sure not to miss “Weather, People and Health” with former TV weatherman Art Horn on Wednesday, November 8 at 10:30 AM!
* * * * * * * *
On Wednesday, November 29 at 10:30 AM the Meriden Triad Program and the Senior Center will present a program on “Holiday Scams and Personal Safety Tips for the Holiday Season” by Crime Prevention Officer Tom Cirillo from the Meriden Police Department. Officer Cirillo will discuss holiday season crimes that can victimize older people including frauds and scams, purse snatching, pickpocketing, theft of checks from the mail and identity theft as well as provide tips for walking, driving, parking and home safety during the holiday season. Refreshments will be served and four free door prizes of $5 gift certificates to Stop & Shop will be distributed courtesy of the Meriden Triad Program. Plan to attend this program in the first floor meeting room on Wednesday, November 29 at 10:30 AM to learn more about “Holiday Scams and Personal Safety Tips for the Holiday Season” sponsored by the Meriden Triad Program.
* * * * * * * *
The 2006 Senior Center Holiday Fair and Bake Sale will be on Wednesday, December 6 from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm. Handmade items will be sold by the Knitting and Ceramic classes and bake sales and raffles will also be held. Senior Center members willing to bake for the Bake Sale are asked to sign-up in the main office – we appreciate your help! All proceeds will benefit the Meriden Senior Citizens’ Award Scholarship. The Holiday Fair is open to the public free of charge and we hope to see you there!
* * * * * * * *
Mayor Mark D. Benigni and the Meriden City Council have established a new Advisory Board on Aging for the City of Meriden. The Advisory Board will offer valuable input and ideas to the Mayor and the City Council on programs and services to benefit Meriden’s senior citizens in the years ahead. Congratulations to newly appointed Advisory Board members Peter Burch, John Clark, Lillie Green, Richard Hackbarth, Ruth Kahn, Geraldine Meoni, Donna Macri, Sister Georgeann Vumbaco, John Thorp, Bruce Fontanella, Celia Ramos, John Varley and Thomas Kraft!
* * * * * * * *
For a complete listing of all Senior Center classes, activities, trips and meal menus, pick-up a copy of our newsletter available on the first of each month at the reception desk in the front lobby.
John F. Hogarth Senior Center Director

Wallingford Senior Center Newsletter Info for November
VETERANS’ DAY PROGRAM on Thursday, November 9, 11:00 a.m.
Join us as we salute our veterans on November 9, at 11:00 a.m. Our keynote speaker will be Connecticut State Senator Leonard Fasano. The program will also feature patriotic music by the Vintage Voices and participation by local veterans groups. Do come to honor all those who have served our nation.
WARTIME SERVICE MEDALS FOR CONNECTICUT VETERANS
The Honorable Leonard Fasano, State Senator from the 34th District and the Wallingford Senior Center are teaming together to assist wartime veterans receive the Connecticut Veterans Wartime Service Medal. If you are a veteran who served 90 days wartime service (unless the war or operation lasted less than 90 days) and you were honorably discharged from military service (or discharged due to injuries received in the line of duty), you are eligible to receive the Wartime Service Medal. Please sign up during the month of November, and you will be contacted regarding the application process.
JUST FOR MEN BREAKFAST
Wednesday, November 15, 8:00 a.m.
Breakfast this month includes a bacon, egg and cheese sandwich, hash brown potatoes, fruit, juice and coffee. Guest Vito DeVito, a former Yankee farm team second baseman and former Yale football coach, will “talk sports” following breakfast. Tickets are on sale through November 14, at $2.00 for Senior Center members and $3.00 for non-members.
GOD IS WITH US: SIGNS IN OUR LIVES
PROGRAM & BOOK SIGNING
Thursday, November 30, 11:00 a.m.
Joan M. Barbuto, Wallingford resident and member of our Senior Center, has had a book published entitled God Is With Us: Signs in Our Lives. Joan’s book offers evidence that there is a form of existence after death, a God who sometimes intercedes in near-death experiences, and death-related visions by noted psychologists and physicians. Joan will give a talk about her book on November 30, at 11:00 a.m. Copies of the book will be for sale following the presentation at the reduced cost of $10 for Senior Center members.
INFORMATIONAL SEMINAR: HEALTH NET MEDICARE PROGRAM
with Bonnie Maynard
Monday, November 13, 10:15 a.m.
Health Net is a Medicare Advantage Plan offering medical plans with and without built-in prescription drug coverage. Because not everyone is looking for the same coverage, Health Net offers a variety of plan options, each with different levels of coverage so you can select the plan that best meets your medical and drug needs. Their comprehensive medical and prescription drug plan premiums start as low as $0 a month. Most Medicare plans change from year to year. If you are not sure that you are getting the health and prescription drug coverage you need, or you want to compare your coverage with Health Net Medicare plans, mark your calendar to attend this seminar. Please call the Senior Center at 265-7753 to sign up. This program is open to the public.
MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT BEGINS NOVEMBER 15
Take the Rx Enrollment Check-up Today
Get the Most Out of Your Medicare
Medicare’s open enrollment starts November 15. Now is the time to evaluate your current plan—has it met your needs this year? Medicare recommends taking this quick Rx Enrollment Check-up. If you are satisfied with your plan, you do not have to do anything to re-enroll. Take a few minutes now and ask yourself these three questions:
COST: Will your premium and costs change in 2007?
COVERAGE: Do you need more coverage in 2007? Will the prescription drugs you take be covered by your plan in 2007?
CUSTOMER SERVICE: Are you satisfied with your plan’s service?
Important Medicare Enrollment Dates
Mid-October—Prepare
Compare plans on www.medicare.gov
November 15—Open Enrollment Begins
December 31—Open Enrollment Ends
January 1—Coverage Begins
Enroll early to make sure you can get the prescriptions you need on January 1, 2007. Medicare is here to help you – online, on the phone, or at events in your community. You can also call the plans direct. For more information contact Medicare at 1-800-633-4227 or research via their website at www.medicare.gov. Social Worker Marie Cunha is also available to help. Information obtained from: SHIPresourcecenter@air.org
CT ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 2006-2007 HEATING SEASON
The Wallingford Senior Center takes applications for energy assistance for Wallingford residents, age 60 and over. The program provides financial assistance to income-eligible households to pay for a portion of their heating costs during the winter months. First day for authorization of fuel delivery is November 1. Gas and electric customers can call beginning December 4 for an appointment. Income limits have been raised to: $27,867.32 for a single person and $36,441.88 for two people. There are asset limits.
Applicants MUST bring (2) photocopies
of the following documents:
Year 2006 Social Security check amount (copy of recent check, or most recent bank statement showing deposited amount, or Social Security “2006 New Benefit” letter.);
Most recent checking, savings, CD, annuity, stock, bond documents.
2006 year-to-date pension or annuity dividends and/or interest income.
Four most recent pay stubs, if employed.
Rental Income — rent stub or copy of check deposited into bank account.
Driver’s license or birth certificate.
Most recent heat utility bill.
Electric bill.
Applications are by appointment only.
To schedule an appointment, call 265-7753.
ENERGY ASSISTANCE DATES WALLINGFORD SENIOR HOUSING
Tuesday, November 28
McKenna Court: 9:00 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.
Southside Terrace: 12:30 p.m. — 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, November 29
John Savage Commons: 9:00 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.
East Side Terrace: 12:30 p.m. — 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, December 6
McGuire Court: 9 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.
HEARING & HEARING LOSS on Thursday, November 16, 10:00 a.m.
Lori Charette, Senior Audiologist at the Gaylord Hearing Center, will present a program on hearing, hearing loss, and hearing aids, on November 16, at 10:00 a.m. Learn the facts about hearing loss and hearing aids, including how to determine IF you have a hearing loss and what you should know BEFORE you buy a hearing aid. Please call the Senior Center at 265-7753 to register. This program is open to the public.

Mayor’s Corner - Wallingford
Dear Citizens:
It is important that we as a community honor the men and women who have served and now serve in the United States military. We all have family members or friends who at one time or another were enrolled in a branch of military duty. While we are fortunate that at this time our military is staffed by volunteers, in many nations military duty is mandatory.
My Father served as a doctor in World War II, landing on Omaha Beach on D-Day plus 6. He was proud of the work performed by his unit - an evacuation hospital. My brother, sister and I grew up feeling that my Father had done something truly remarkable. That’s a good feeling. He could not talk about the wartime very often, but when he did we learned to appreciate the importance of military service.
Perhaps all of life is a battle over values. At times those conceptual battles became the stage for actual physical conflicts. It is those times when we realize how significant and necessary is the presence of a well-trained and motivated military. Freedom is real when men and women enforce the laws which embody its principles.
Veteran’s Day is a singular expression of honor and respect for men and women who gave so much of themselves for the protection of our great country. It is most appropriate that we remember them and the awesome example they represent. May God bless our veterans.
Sincerely,
William W. Dickinson, Jr.
Mayor of Wallingford


CITY OF MERIDEN NOVEMBER EVENTS
TURKEY HUNT
Tom the Turkey is trying something new! To avoid being found, he has chosen five hiding spots this year. Clues to the five locations will be given on the Recreation Activity Line (630-4279) on the following dates: 11/9, 11/13, 11/14, 11/15, & 11/16. Children ages 12 & under are asked to identify the locations on paper and submit them to the Parks & Recreation office (460 Liberty Street) by 4:00PM on Monday, November 20th. Entries can be mailed or delivered in-person and should contain the child’s full name, address, phone, school, and grade level. One winner will be selected by drawing to receive a special Thanksgiving prize package. Remember, Tom is not physically located at his hiding locations.
VETERANS’ DAY CEREMONY
The Meriden United Veterans Council will hold the 2006 Veterans’ Day Ceremony on Saturday, November 11th at the Stop & Shop Veterans’ Plaza (across from the Broad Street monuments) at 10:30AM. The public is invited & encouraged to show their appreciation to those who have given so much in protecting our freedom. Refreshments will be provided.
FESTIVAL OF SILVER LIGHTS ILLUMINATION CEREMONY
The 2006-2007 Festival of Silver Lights will kick off on Tuesday, November 21st with a special lighting ceremony at Hubbard Park’s pool parking lot at 6:00PM. The event will feature music, entertainment, costumed characters, refreshments, and the chance to see this year’s holiday lights illuminated for the very first time.
2006-2007 CO-ED ADULT VOLLEYBALL PROGRAM
Organized recreational volleyball games for adults ages 18 & older take place every Tuesday night at Holy Angels Center in South Meriden from 6:00-9:00PM. The program runs through March 27th. A one-time $25.00 registration fee can be paid onsite any night the program is in session. Please note the program will not meet on Tuesday, November 14th.
INDOOR PUBLIC SWIM PROGRAM
The 2006-2007 Indoor Public Swim Program takes place at the Maloney HS pool on the following dates & times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 6:30-7:45PM and Saturdays & Sundays from 12:00-3:45PM.
All interested participants must possess a valid 2006 pool pass. Available for purchase at the Parks & Recreation office, passes cost $5.00 for adults and $1.00 for children ages 17 & under. Potential recipients must come to the office in-person and bring proof of Meriden residency to receive a pass.


Wallingford Park and Recreation Events
Hip House Dance Series
Once again the Hip House Dance Series is back for another year of fun and excitement. The parks and
recreation department would like to welcome back all of the retuning 7th and 8th graders while also welcoming the new 6th graders. To ensure that you are able to attend all of the dances, you must purchase a photo ID pass. The dance pass allows you entry to the dance. No passes will be sold in the schools or on the
day of the dance. Photo ID’s will go on sale July 1st for $25.00. As of September 1st, all dance passes will be $35.00. We encourage everyone to take advantage of the discounted price. Participants will not be allowed to enter the dance without a photo ID pass.
The Party Place
Let the recreation department throw your child’s birthday party. We provide the decorations,
paper goods, party planner and fun. $125 per party (up to 10 children ages 4 to 10) $7 each additional child. Includes Party room, gymnastic room, streamers, table covers, balloons, party favor, party hats, ooey gooey craft, stickers, lolli pops a party coordinator to plan, set up, clean up and facilitate the party For more information, please contact the recreation department at 294-2120.
Ski Bums at Mt. Southington
Whether you’re a skier or a boarder, this is five nights of fun on the slopes that you do not want
to miss. Registration for all Ski Bum programs will begin on Wednesday, November 1st and will end November 17th at the recreation department. Each program will be limited to 100 participants. Complete fee schedule is not available as of this printing. Please call the recreation department in October for a complete listing of program options and fees. Any parent that is interested in becoming a chaperone should contact Michelle at the recreation department. Chaperones will have the opportunity to ski/snowboard at no cost. Please note that registration will only be held for two weeks during the dates provided above.
Program breakdown:
4th & 5th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
6th, 7th & 8th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
9th & 10th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
9 AND A CHICKEN
This year’s hunt will be one for the ages. Participants will be required to go to the Recreation Department to pick up a packet of CERTIFIED clues. (We want to make sure that all participants start from the Recreation Department so everyone has a fair shot) These clues will lead you to 9 cardboard turkeys and the bonus chicken. All cardboard turkeys and chicken will be hidden on Wallingford town property. The object is to locate a turkey and return it to the Parks and Recreation for the gift certificate. Awards: “Turkey Baskets” from Sweet Nuts Ice Cream. Clues must be handed in at time of redemption.
When: November 17, 2006
Day: Friday Time: 7:00p.m.
Fee: Free
Where: Wallingford Parks and Recreation Department


Mayor’s Corner – Meriden
Dear Friends,
I hope you had a Happy Halloween and are anxiously awaiting the Thanksgiving holiday. I would like to congratulate the Meriden Raiders teams who will once again be competing for state championships. I would also like to thank Noah’s Arc of Hope for teaming up with the playground committee to bring a new handicap accessible playscape to Hubbard Park. This will be a great addition to beautiful Hubbard Park.
The Meriden City Council recently passed a resolution supporting universal healthcare. Statistics show eighty percent of our uninsured are working people. We have also seen the rising cost of medical benefits negatively impact small businesses. In the greatest country on earth, we must work together to find a way to provide healthcare for all our citizens. The linear trail is paved and the finishing touches are being put on the project. The beautiful scenic route along the Quinnipiac River is definitely worth the three mile round trip.
On Saturday afternoon October 21st, Hubbard Park was bustling with excitement during the annual Autumn Fest, a free event for children and families. This was a great day for children to pick a pumpkin, take a hay ride, eat a carmel apple, and help plan the future playscape. Thank you to all the volunteers, sponsors, and city staff for a job well done. While the weather cancelled the hayrides, the Silver City Diner Halloween party was still a lot of fun for the children in attendance. Pin the tail on the witch, ghost hunts, plenty of refreshments, and great costumes made for an enjoyable afternoon. Thank you to the Silver City Diner and staff.
Thank you to all the volunteers and entertainers who made the Hispanic Heritage reception a great success. Amy, Bria and I enjoyed the company, music, art and food. Thank you for helping Meriden celebrate our 200th birthday with a fun, educational event.
Hubbard Park is getting ready for the annual Silver City light display. So get ready to enjoy the lights as you take a ride through Hubbard Park.
Stay safe and enjoy the holiday!
Thanks,

Mark D. Benigni
Mayor

Meriden and Wallingford Town News and Events Early Nov. 2006

MAX E. MURAVNICK MERIDEN SENIOR CITIZENS’ CENTER
Meteorologist Art Horn will again visit the Senior Center to put on his latest weather show, “Weather, People and Health”. Art’s fun and informative show will be on Wednesday, November 8 from 10:30 - 11:30 AM in the first floor meeting room. His 45 minute slide show will cover such topics as how weather and climate affects people, the impact of summer heat waves, the depletion of the ozone layer, weather and allergies and how weather affects all aspects of our daily lives. Following his slide show Art will conduct a 10 to 15 minute question and answer session. Be sure not to miss “Weather, People and Health” with former TV weatherman Art Horn on Wednesday, November 8 at 10:30 AM!
* * * * * * * *
On Wednesday, November 29 at 10:30 AM the Meriden Triad Program and the Senior Center will present a program on “Holiday Scams and Personal Safety Tips for the Holiday Season” by Crime Prevention Officer Tom Cirillo from the Meriden Police Department. Officer Cirillo will discuss holiday season crimes that can victimize older people including frauds and scams, purse snatching, pickpocketing, theft of checks from the mail and identity theft as well as provide tips for walking, driving, parking and home safety during the holiday season. Refreshments will be served and four free door prizes of $5 gift certificates to Stop & Shop will be distributed courtesy of the Meriden Triad Program. Plan to attend this program in the first floor meeting room on Wednesday, November 29 at 10:30 AM to learn more about “Holiday Scams and Personal Safety Tips for the Holiday Season” sponsored by the Meriden Triad Program.
* * * * * * * *
The 2006 Senior Center Holiday Fair and Bake Sale will be on Wednesday, December 6 from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm. Handmade items will be sold by the Knitting and Ceramic classes and bake sales and raffles will also be held. Senior Center members willing to bake for the Bake Sale are asked to sign-up in the main office – we appreciate your help! All proceeds will benefit the Meriden Senior Citizens’ Award Scholarship. The Holiday Fair is open to the public free of charge and we hope to see you there!
* * * * * * * *
Mayor Mark D. Benigni and the Meriden City Council have established a new Advisory Board on Aging for the City of Meriden. The Advisory Board will offer valuable input and ideas to the Mayor and the City Council on programs and services to benefit Meriden’s senior citizens in the years ahead. Congratulations to newly appointed Advisory Board members Peter Burch, John Clark, Lillie Green, Richard Hackbarth, Ruth Kahn, Geraldine Meoni, Donna Macri, Sister Georgeann Vumbaco, John Thorp, Bruce Fontanella, Celia Ramos, John Varley and Thomas Kraft!
* * * * * * * *
For a complete listing of all Senior Center classes, activities, trips and meal menus, pick-up a copy of our newsletter available on the first of each month at the reception desk in the front lobby.
John F. Hogarth Senior Center Director

Wallingford Senior Center Newsletter Info for November
VETERANS’ DAY PROGRAM on Thursday, November 9, 11:00 a.m.
Join us as we salute our veterans on November 9, at 11:00 a.m. Our keynote speaker will be Connecticut State Senator Leonard Fasano. The program will also feature patriotic music by the Vintage Voices and participation by local veterans groups. Do come to honor all those who have served our nation.
WARTIME SERVICE MEDALS FOR CONNECTICUT VETERANS
The Honorable Leonard Fasano, State Senator from the 34th District and the Wallingford Senior Center are teaming together to assist wartime veterans receive the Connecticut Veterans Wartime Service Medal. If you are a veteran who served 90 days wartime service (unless the war or operation lasted less than 90 days) and you were honorably discharged from military service (or discharged due to injuries received in the line of duty), you are eligible to receive the Wartime Service Medal. Please sign up during the month of November, and you will be contacted regarding the application process.
JUST FOR MEN BREAKFAST
Wednesday, November 15, 8:00 a.m.
Breakfast this month includes a bacon, egg and cheese sandwich, hash brown potatoes, fruit, juice and coffee. Guest Vito DeVito, a former Yankee farm team second baseman and former Yale football coach, will “talk sports” following breakfast. Tickets are on sale through November 14, at $2.00 for Senior Center members and $3.00 for non-members.
GOD IS WITH US: SIGNS IN OUR LIVES
PROGRAM & BOOK SIGNING
Thursday, November 30, 11:00 a.m.
Joan M. Barbuto, Wallingford resident and member of our Senior Center, has had a book published entitled God Is With Us: Signs in Our Lives. Joan’s book offers evidence that there is a form of existence after death, a God who sometimes intercedes in near-death experiences, and death-related visions by noted psychologists and physicians. Joan will give a talk about her book on November 30, at 11:00 a.m. Copies of the book will be for sale following the presentation at the reduced cost of $10 for Senior Center members.
INFORMATIONAL SEMINAR: HEALTH NET MEDICARE PROGRAM
with Bonnie Maynard
Monday, November 13, 10:15 a.m.
Health Net is a Medicare Advantage Plan offering medical plans with and without built-in prescription drug coverage. Because not everyone is looking for the same coverage, Health Net offers a variety of plan options, each with different levels of coverage so you can select the plan that best meets your medical and drug needs. Their comprehensive medical and prescription drug plan premiums start as low as $0 a month. Most Medicare plans change from year to year. If you are not sure that you are getting the health and prescription drug coverage you need, or you want to compare your coverage with Health Net Medicare plans, mark your calendar to attend this seminar. Please call the Senior Center at 265-7753 to sign up. This program is open to the public.
MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT BEGINS NOVEMBER 15
Take the Rx Enrollment Check-up Today
Get the Most Out of Your Medicare
Medicare’s open enrollment starts November 15. Now is the time to evaluate your current plan—has it met your needs this year? Medicare recommends taking this quick Rx Enrollment Check-up. If you are satisfied with your plan, you do not have to do anything to re-enroll. Take a few minutes now and ask yourself these three questions:
COST: Will your premium and costs change in 2007?
COVERAGE: Do you need more coverage in 2007? Will the prescription drugs you take be covered by your plan in 2007?
CUSTOMER SERVICE: Are you satisfied with your plan’s service?
Important Medicare Enrollment Dates
Mid-October—Prepare
Compare plans on www.medicare.gov
November 15—Open Enrollment Begins
December 31—Open Enrollment Ends
January 1—Coverage Begins
Enroll early to make sure you can get the prescriptions you need on January 1, 2007. Medicare is here to help you – online, on the phone, or at events in your community. You can also call the plans direct. For more information contact Medicare at 1-800-633-4227 or research via their website at www.medicare.gov. Social Worker Marie Cunha is also available to help. Information obtained from: SHIPresourcecenter@air.org
CT ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 2006-2007 HEATING SEASON
The Wallingford Senior Center takes applications for energy assistance for Wallingford residents, age 60 and over. The program provides financial assistance to income-eligible households to pay for a portion of their heating costs during the winter months. First day for authorization of fuel delivery is November 1. Gas and electric customers can call beginning December 4 for an appointment. Income limits have been raised to: $27,867.32 for a single person and $36,441.88 for two people. There are asset limits.
Applicants MUST bring (2) photocopies
of the following documents:
Year 2006 Social Security check amount (copy of recent check, or most recent bank statement showing deposited amount, or Social Security “2006 New Benefit” letter.);
Most recent checking, savings, CD, annuity, stock, bond documents.
2006 year-to-date pension or annuity dividends and/or interest income.
Four most recent pay stubs, if employed.
Rental Income — rent stub or copy of check deposited into bank account.
Driver’s license or birth certificate.
Most recent heat utility bill.
Electric bill.
Applications are by appointment only.
To schedule an appointment, call 265-7753.
ENERGY ASSISTANCE DATES WALLINGFORD SENIOR HOUSING
Tuesday, November 28
McKenna Court: 9:00 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.
Southside Terrace: 12:30 p.m. — 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, November 29
John Savage Commons: 9:00 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.
East Side Terrace: 12:30 p.m. — 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, December 6
McGuire Court: 9 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.
HEARING & HEARING LOSS on Thursday, November 16, 10:00 a.m.
Lori Charette, Senior Audiologist at the Gaylord Hearing Center, will present a program on hearing, hearing loss, and hearing aids, on November 16, at 10:00 a.m. Learn the facts about hearing loss and hearing aids, including how to determine IF you have a hearing loss and what you should know BEFORE you buy a hearing aid. Please call the Senior Center at 265-7753 to register. This program is open to the public.

Mayor’s Corner - Wallingford
Dear Citizens:
It is important that we as a community honor the men and women who have served and now serve in the United States military. We all have family members or friends who at one time or another were enrolled in a branch of military duty. While we are fortunate that at this time our military is staffed by volunteers, in many nations military duty is mandatory.
My Father served as a doctor in World War II, landing on Omaha Beach on D-Day plus 6. He was proud of the work performed by his unit - an evacuation hospital. My brother, sister and I grew up feeling that my Father had done something truly remarkable. That’s a good feeling. He could not talk about the wartime very often, but when he did we learned to appreciate the importance of military service.
Perhaps all of life is a battle over values. At times those conceptual battles became the stage for actual physical conflicts. It is those times when we realize how significant and necessary is the presence of a well-trained and motivated military. Freedom is real when men and women enforce the laws which embody its principles.
Veteran’s Day is a singular expression of honor and respect for men and women who gave so much of themselves for the protection of our great country. It is most appropriate that we remember them and the awesome example they represent. May God bless our veterans.
Sincerely,
William W. Dickinson, Jr.
Mayor of Wallingford


CITY OF MERIDEN NOVEMBER EVENTS
TURKEY HUNT
Tom the Turkey is trying something new! To avoid being found, he has chosen five hiding spots this year. Clues to the five locations will be given on the Recreation Activity Line (630-4279) on the following dates: 11/9, 11/13, 11/14, 11/15, & 11/16. Children ages 12 & under are asked to identify the locations on paper and submit them to the Parks & Recreation office (460 Liberty Street) by 4:00PM on Monday, November 20th. Entries can be mailed or delivered in-person and should contain the child’s full name, address, phone, school, and grade level. One winner will be selected by drawing to receive a special Thanksgiving prize package. Remember, Tom is not physically located at his hiding locations.
VETERANS’ DAY CEREMONY
The Meriden United Veterans Council will hold the 2006 Veterans’ Day Ceremony on Saturday, November 11th at the Stop & Shop Veterans’ Plaza (across from the Broad Street monuments) at 10:30AM. The public is invited & encouraged to show their appreciation to those who have given so much in protecting our freedom. Refreshments will be provided.
FESTIVAL OF SILVER LIGHTS ILLUMINATION CEREMONY
The 2006-2007 Festival of Silver Lights will kick off on Tuesday, November 21st with a special lighting ceremony at Hubbard Park’s pool parking lot at 6:00PM. The event will feature music, entertainment, costumed characters, refreshments, and the chance to see this year’s holiday lights illuminated for the very first time.
2006-2007 CO-ED ADULT VOLLEYBALL PROGRAM
Organized recreational volleyball games for adults ages 18 & older take place every Tuesday night at Holy Angels Center in South Meriden from 6:00-9:00PM. The program runs through March 27th. A one-time $25.00 registration fee can be paid onsite any night the program is in session. Please note the program will not meet on Tuesday, November 14th.
INDOOR PUBLIC SWIM PROGRAM
The 2006-2007 Indoor Public Swim Program takes place at the Maloney HS pool on the following dates & times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 6:30-7:45PM and Saturdays & Sundays from 12:00-3:45PM.
All interested participants must possess a valid 2006 pool pass. Available for purchase at the Parks & Recreation office, passes cost $5.00 for adults and $1.00 for children ages 17 & under. Potential recipients must come to the office in-person and bring proof of Meriden residency to receive a pass.


Wallingford Park and Recreation Events
Hip House Dance Series
Once again the Hip House Dance Series is back for another year of fun and excitement. The parks and
recreation department would like to welcome back all of the retuning 7th and 8th graders while also welcoming the new 6th graders. To ensure that you are able to attend all of the dances, you must purchase a photo ID pass. The dance pass allows you entry to the dance. No passes will be sold in the schools or on the
day of the dance. Photo ID’s will go on sale July 1st for $25.00. As of September 1st, all dance passes will be $35.00. We encourage everyone to take advantage of the discounted price. Participants will not be allowed to enter the dance without a photo ID pass.
The Party Place
Let the recreation department throw your child’s birthday party. We provide the decorations,
paper goods, party planner and fun. $125 per party (up to 10 children ages 4 to 10) $7 each additional child. Includes Party room, gymnastic room, streamers, table covers, balloons, party favor, party hats, ooey gooey craft, stickers, lolli pops a party coordinator to plan, set up, clean up and facilitate the party For more information, please contact the recreation department at 294-2120.
Ski Bums at Mt. Southington
Whether you’re a skier or a boarder, this is five nights of fun on the slopes that you do not want
to miss. Registration for all Ski Bum programs will begin on Wednesday, November 1st and will end November 17th at the recreation department. Each program will be limited to 100 participants. Complete fee schedule is not available as of this printing. Please call the recreation department in October for a complete listing of program options and fees. Any parent that is interested in becoming a chaperone should contact Michelle at the recreation department. Chaperones will have the opportunity to ski/snowboard at no cost. Please note that registration will only be held for two weeks during the dates provided above.
Program breakdown:
4th & 5th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
6th, 7th & 8th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
9th & 10th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
9 AND A CHICKEN
This year’s hunt will be one for the ages. Participants will be required to go to the Recreation Department to pick up a packet of CERTIFIED clues. (We want to make sure that all participants start from the Recreation Department so everyone has a fair shot) These clues will lead you to 9 cardboard turkeys and the bonus chicken. All cardboard turkeys and chicken will be hidden on Wallingford town property. The object is to locate a turkey and return it to the Parks and Recreation for the gift certificate. Awards: “Turkey Baskets” from Sweet Nuts Ice Cream. Clues must be handed in at time of redemption.
When: November 17, 2006
Day: Friday Time: 7:00p.m.
Fee: Free
Where: Wallingford Parks and Recreation Department


Mayor’s Corner – Meriden
Dear Friends,
I hope you had a Happy Halloween and are anxiously awaiting the Thanksgiving holiday. I would like to congratulate the Meriden Raiders teams who will once again be competing for state championships. I would also like to thank Noah’s Arc of Hope for teaming up with the playground committee to bring a new handicap accessible playscape to Hubbard Park. This will be a great addition to beautiful Hubbard Park.
The Meriden City Council recently passed a resolution supporting universal healthcare. Statistics show eighty percent of our uninsured are working people. We have also seen the rising cost of medical benefits negatively impact small businesses. In the greatest country on earth, we must work together to find a way to provide healthcare for all our citizens. The linear trail is paved and the finishing touches are being put on the project. The beautiful scenic route along the Quinnipiac River is definitely worth the three mile round trip.
On Saturday afternoon October 21st, Hubbard Park was bustling with excitement during the annual Autumn Fest, a free event for children and families. This was a great day for children to pick a pumpkin, take a hay ride, eat a carmel apple, and help plan the future playscape. Thank you to all the volunteers, sponsors, and city staff for a job well done. While the weather cancelled the hayrides, the Silver City Diner Halloween party was still a lot of fun for the children in attendance. Pin the tail on the witch, ghost hunts, plenty of refreshments, and great costumes made for an enjoyable afternoon. Thank you to the Silver City Diner and staff.
Thank you to all the volunteers and entertainers who made the Hispanic Heritage reception a great success. Amy, Bria and I enjoyed the company, music, art and food. Thank you for helping Meriden celebrate our 200th birthday with a fun, educational event.
Hubbard Park is getting ready for the annual Silver City light display. So get ready to enjoy the lights as you take a ride through Hubbard Park.
Stay safe and enjoy the holiday!
Thanks,

Mark D. Benigni
Mayor

Meriden Health Department News Early November 2006

Health News – Early November 2006
FLU VACCINATIONS AVAILABLE THROUGH MERIDEN HEALTH DEPARTMENT
The Meriden Health Department will offer the influenza (flu) vaccine on the following dates:
November 8, 2006
2:00pm-6:00pm
Meriden Health Department
165 Miller Street
(Open to all Meriden residents, including City of Meriden and Board of Education employees)
November 15, 2006
9:00-12:00pm
Meriden Senior Citizens Center
22 West Main Street
(Seniors over 60 years of age and chronically ill residents encouraged to attend)
The cost of each inoculation is $20.00. Medicare Part B will be accepted. Any persons allergic to eggs or any part of the flu vaccine are not eligible for the vaccination.
All vaccination dates are by appointment only. Please call the Meriden Health Department at 630-4234 to make an appointment.


November 16 is the Great American Smokeout!
Thinking about quitting smoking? Why not start on November 16 – the day of the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout!
Here are a few reasons to consider kicking the habit:
Your health! Health concerns usually top the list people give for quitting smoking. Smoking is a risk factor for many types of cancer and lung diseases, and can contribute to having a heart attack. Smoking can also cause premature wrinkling of the skin, bad breath, bad smelling clothes and hair, and yellow fingernails!
The health of people around you! Smoking not only harms your health but the health of those around you. Secondhand smoke (the smoke exhaled as well as smoke from burning cigarettes) causes thousands of deaths each year from lung cancer and heart disease in healthy nonsmokers.
Setting an example! If you have children, you probably want to set a good example for them. When asked, nearly all smokers say they don't want their children to smoke, but children whose parents smoke are more likely to start smoking themselves. You can become a good role model for them by quitting now.
Smokers are most successful in kicking the habit permanently when they have some means of support such as nicotine replacement therapy, counseling, guide books, and the encouragement of friends and family members. The Meriden Health Department has many resources to help you quit the habit of smoking. Please call Debbie Roman, Smoking Cessation Counselor, at 630-4104.

Wallingford and Meriden Library News - Early November

Wallingford Public Library News and Events
American Masters - Playwrights
This fall Wallingford Public Library will be celebrating the work of four American masters: Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Sam Shepard, and Tony Kushner. One play by each of these authors will be discussed on every other Monday evening at 7:00 beginning on October 2nd.Mark Johnston, Professor of English at Quinnipiac University, will lead discussions. The schedule for discussions is as follows: ~ November 13th ~ Angels in America. This play, by Tony Kushner, explores “the state of the nation”—the sexual, racial, religious, political, and social issues confronting the country during the Reagan years, as the AIDS epidemic spreads.Copies of the plays will be available at the Information Desk. Call the Library at 203 265-6754, or stop by the Information Desk to sign up for this free series.For those interested, filmed versions of Death of a Salesman, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and Angels in America are also available
Fall in the Children’s Room
This October, the Children's Department will be wrapping up its fall story time series and getting ready for the first of two big moves. In December we expect to be moving downstairs to the meeting Room, while the upstairs is being renovated. Following the renovations we will move upstairs to our new quarters on the south side of the building.As a result of these necessary changes, the Children's Room will be unable to offer story times and other programs until we have set up downstairs, and until the additional new small program room becomes available. We will miss all our friends during story times but we hope you will all continue to visit us and take out lots of your favorite books in the meantime.Our smaller temporary Children's Room will be fully functioning and even have a train set, donated by TOYZ of Cheshire, which we know everyone will enjoy. And as always, there will be lots of great books, DVDs, and more waiting for you.
Fall Story timesThe story times held in the Library are over for now and we appreciate everyone's patience as we moved the location of all the programs all over the library this fall! We are now going to be able to offer a Wednesday morning story time at a new location! The WE CARE Family Resource Center at Youth and Family Services has offered to let us use their facility for three drop-in story times. This is a drop-in program for kids ages 3 to 5 and younger siblings are welcome to attend. Please join us for stories, songs, finger plays and other activities! For more information call the Children's Room at the Wallingford Public Library. 265-6754. The WE CARE Family Resource Center at Youth and Family Services is located at 6 Fairfield Blvd.

Wallingford Public Library Tile Wall Mural
The Town of Wallingford has provided $12,065,000 to build a state-of-the-art public library and the Wallingford Public Library Association is launching a campaign to raise $500,000 to furnish and equip this wonderful new civic space.
A mural of tiles sponsored by individuals, businesses, and organizations will be a cornerstone of this fund-raising campaign. The tile mural will tell the story of Wallingford – past and present, and will recognize donors to the furnishing fund. Renowned ceramic artist Marion Grebow has been commissioned to create this permanent public art installation.
Sponsor a Tile
Help furnish the expanded Library and celebrate Wallingford's past, present and future! We invite you to help create a work of art to commemorate Wallingford's story from its agricultural beginnings to the modern community it is today. The artist’s hand-sculpted bas-relief picture tiles will be based on historical research and resources. Tiles will depict actual events, places, and native plants and animals that reflect Wallingford, past and present. When you buy a tile, your name or a name of your choice will be permanently glazed under the picture.
To find out how you can purchase a tile, stop by the Reference desk for more information, sizes, costs and suggested titles.
Identity and Self-Respect
This month Wallingford Public Library is offering interested individuals a unique opportunity to participate in a three-part discussion series on the theme of Identity and Self-Respect. Identity and Self-Respect brings together works that explore themes of universal human significance. In this series we will look at three statements on identity and self-respect from Plato, James Baldwin and contemporary Canadian writer Alice Munro.These readings portray characters whose lives and motivations are complex, embody concepts that go beyond simple analysis, and raise many questions to inspire extended reflection. Thursday, November 16th - Apology, by PlatoThursday, November 30th - A Room of One’s Own, by Alice Munro
Librarian Sue Smayda will serve as discussion leader for this series, which will be held on the first floor in the Meeting House next to the First Congregational Church, 23 South Main Street in Wallingford on Thursday, November 2nd, 16th and 30th at 7:00 p.m.Participants may borrow an anthology containing all of the readings and will be expected to read each selection prior to the discussion. This series is limited to 17 participants. Call the Library at (203) 265-6754 to register for this free discussion program.

Meriden Library News and Events
IRVING MOY TO RE-ENACT LIFE OF MERIDEN CIVIL WAR SOLDIER JOSEPH PIERCE IN BICENTENNIAL PERFORMANCE NOVEMBER 8 Meriden Public Library will feature Civil War re-enactor Irving Moy in a special Bicentennial performance on Wednesday, November 8 at 7:00 p.m. Moy will reenact the life of Joseph Pierce, a Chinese Yankee soldier from Meriden who fought in the Civil War. The event, which is free, is co-sponsored by the Friends of Meriden Public Library. There were many immigrants who fought in the Civil War. Regiments were formed to capture the ethnic pride each had to fight for a country they adopted for the cause of Union. There were the Italians and French of the "Garibaldi Guard", the Scottish "Highlanders" and the most famous, "the Irish Brigade." But few people know of the participation of the Chinese with the most famous Chinese soldier being Joseph Pierce, who lived in the City of Meriden. Sold at the age of 10 to a sea captain, fought in the Civil War with the 14th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, Army of the Potomac at Antietam and Gettysburg, later settling in Meriden as a silver engraver, don't miss this opportunity to see and hear Irving Moy (a Chinese-American Civil War re-enactor) make Joseph Pierce come alive in his presentation, "Joseph Pierce, a Chinese Yankee Soldier." Irving Moy is also the author of a compendium of research on the subject of Joseph Pierce, which is located in the Local History Collection of Meriden Public Library. Moy, a graduate of Washington University and Fairfield University, is a Public Health Services Manager with the State of Connecticut Department of Public Health. His interest in the Civil War is the result of a life long interest in and the study of the life of Abraham Lincoln. He thanks his wife, Julie, who also has an interest in this Nation's history for allowing him to live out his passion and fascination with Lincoln and the Civil War Era. The program is free and the public is invited to attend. Since seating is limited, free registration is requested by calling (203) 630-6349 or sending an email to: comsvc@hotmail.com or signing up at the online calendar at www.meridenlibrary.org
PROGRAM ON HOW SOCIAL SECURITY WORKS SCHEDULED FOR NOVEMBER 15 Meriden Public Library will present a Powerpoint program on how Social Security works on Wednesday, November 15 at 7:00 p.m. Paul Gilfillan, district manager of the Meriden Social Security District Office, will be the guest speaker. Everyone is welcome to attend. What is your stake in Social Security? How does Social Security work? What is the future of Social Security? Although Gilfillan is a newcomer to the Meriden office, he has worked for the Social Security Administration for 30 years, in a variety of positions and locations. The program is free and the public is invited to attend. Since seating is limited, free registration is requested by calling (203) 630-6349 or by sending an email to: comsvc@hotmail.com or by signing up at the online calendar at www.meridenlibrary.org
DONOVANS TO PRESENT TRAVEL PROGRAM ON ITALY ON NOVEMBER 19 Meriden Public Library will host a Powerpoint travel program on Italy called "Volcanoes, Vias, Vineyards and the Vatican" on Sunday, November 19 at 2:00 p.m. Frank and Phyllis Donovan will be the guest speakers. From the splendors of ancient Rome and the Vatican, past the shadow of Vesuvius, along the precipitous cliffs of Amalfi and Capri, then up past Assisi to the lush panoramas near Leonardo Vinci's birthplace, to the puzzling Leaning Tower of Pisa, and onto the Florence of Lorenzo the Magnificent and Michelangelo - the sights and history of central Italy are still compelling! Come, revisit your memories! Frank and Phyllis Donovan of Meriden are recognized world travelers who regularly research, photograph, write and present their adventures to a wide variety of public groups. For 25 years Phyllis was the Features Editor and Theater Critic for the Record-Journal. Frank was the producer and host for Connecticut Public Television's government and political coverage, including head-to-head debates between candidates for major public offices. He regularly emceed CPTV's Annual Auction for three decades. For 15 years Frank and Phyllis also produced the popular thrice weekly, "Donovan on Broadway - All the Music of Broadway and Hollywood, Too", on 50,000 watt 91.1 FM. Frank retired as an executive with General Electric's Corporate Government Relations Operation at GE's Corporate Headquarters in Fairfield, Connecticut. The Donovans have five children and 10 grandchildren. Frank and Phyllis are now contributors to The Peoples' Press. The program is free and the public is invited to attend. Since seating is limited, please call (203) 630-6349 for free registration; or send an email to: comsvc@hotmail.com or sign up at the online calendar at www.meridenlibrary.org

Events and Activities for Early November 2006

How to make a submission to The People's Press
It's easy to make a submission to The People's Press. Although we cover local events from Central Connecticut in our newspaper, we certainly will accept stories, poems, photos and more from all over the world. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!! You can make a submission by emailing andy@peoplespressnews.com . Mailing to: The People's Press, P.O. Box 4459, Yalesville CT 06492 or going to our website www.peoplespressnews.com and press the submit button. No matter where you are from you may submit a story, poem, photo, recipe and more. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call Andrew P. Reynolds at 203.235.9333. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!!
WALLINGFORD COMMUNITY DINNERS
Come celebrate the holiday with us! Enjoy turkey and all the trimmings – with music, laughter, and a good time for all!
WHEN: THANKSGIVING DAY & CHRISTMAS DAY NOON – 2:00 PMWHERE: FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF WALLINGFORD 23 S. MAIN ST. TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED MEALS WILL BE DELIVERED TO THE HOMEBOUND DON’T SPEND THE HOLIDAY ALONE!! FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299
Sponsored by: Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. and First Congregational Church of Wallingford
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Michael Edward Fanning, 51, Topeka, KS passed away Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2006.
Michael was born February 17, 1955 in Meriden-Wallingford, CT, the son of Edward and Louise Segaline Fanning. He married Tammy Tomlinson on May 10, 1980. Michael graduated from Horris-Wilcox Technical School and worked as an electrician for BNSF railway for 15 years. He was a member of ABATE. He served eight years in Army. He leaves to cherish his memory, his wife, Tammy, son, Paul and his wife, Candace Fanning, daughters, Allison and Ashley Fanning, grandchildren, Neaveh and Brooklyn Fanning, all of Topeka, sisters, Karen Fanning, Clairmont, VT, Maureen Dugette-Fanning, Springfield, VT, and Linda Roukey, Tuscon, AZ. He was preceded in death by his parents and a grandson, Julius James Harvey. A celebration of Michael’s life was held from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., Tuesday, at Kevin Brennan Family Funeral Home, 2801 SW Urish Rd., Topeka, KS. Services in Vermont will be announced at a later date.
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The Senior Buddy Readers Program
Seeks Volunteers
The Senior Buddy Readers intergenerational mentoring & literacy program is currently seeking volunteers for the 2006-2007 school year. Active retirees are needed to help first- and second-grade students improve their reading skills. The program runs from October through the end of May and takes place in six of Meriden’s elementary schools: Ben Franklin, Casimir Pulaski, Hanover, Israel Putnam, Nathan Hale and Thomas Hooker schools. Anyone interested in sharing one hour a week mentoring a child is invited to call the office of Meriden Children First Initiative at 630-3566. Make a difference in the life of a child…become a Senior Buddy Reader volunteer! (The Senior Buddy Readers program is sponsored by nonprofit Meriden Children First Initiative and is supported financially through foundation grants and local business donations.)
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Meriden Humane Society has opened a thrift store, also at 311 Murdock Avenue, Meriden. If you have any items you would like to donate, it would be most appreciative to receive them to bring over to the shelter. Thanks in advance for whatever help you can provide. It is a challenge raising over $200,000 yearly to support the stray and abandoned animals we serve at this no-kill shelter, so any help you can give would be wonderful. Thanks again. **
CT VNA Hospice: Volunteer
Do you want to make a difference in your life and the life of someone else?
Have you ever considered becoming a hospice volunteer? Hospice is about living life to its fullest, and we need your help to make this possible for our patients and their families. There are many volunteer opportunities available.... companionship, respite for weary caregivers, visiting patients with your pet, sharing your musical or artistic talents, or helping with clerical projects.
Training to become a volunteer with Connecticut VNA's hospice will be beginning soon. For an enriching and meaningful experience, please call today.
For more information, please call Jolan Szollosi, Volunteer Coordinator at 203-679-5342
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Lyman Hall Plans 25-year reunion
The Lyman Hall High School class of 1981 will sponsor a 25-year reunion from 7:00 p.m. to midnight Nov. 24th at Zandri’s Stillwood Inn on Route 5. The cost is $50 per person and will include open bar, buffet dinner and a disc jockey. For information, call Joe or Debi (Fusco) Mrozowski at (203) 269-3106.
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HOLY ANGELS CHURCH SEEKS CRAFTERS FOR HOLIDAY BAZAAR
Holy Angels Church, 585 Main Street in South Meriden is seeking Vendors and Craftspeople for its annual holiday bazaar “Christmas on the Hill” to be held on Saturday, November 18. The Bazaar will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Holy Angels Parish Center. The bazaar will feature crafts, food, baked goods and raffle prizes. There is a per-table charge. For further information (203) 235-3822.
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Enter Essay Contest to Win New Playground for Hubbard Park
Please help win a new barrier-free handicapped accessible playground for Hubbard Park! Hasbro is sponsoring an essay contest offering a $300,000 Boundless Playground for one grand prize winner's community, and online gift cards valued at $125 each for 20 finalist prize winners. Submit an original 500- to 750-word essay by November 30th, along with the completed entry form. One entry per family. Go to www.hasbro.com/playskool, click on In the Community/ Boundless Playground for contest rules and to download the entry form. The entry form is also available at www.noahsarkofhope.com .
For more information about the playground project send an email to hubbardParkPlayground@peoplespressnews.com
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CRAFTERS NEEDED FOR CRAFT FAIR
A craft fair is being sponsored by the Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, Meriden/Wallingford Relay for Life Team, and crafters are needed. It will be held on Saturday, November 11th, at the Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, 143 Hope Hill Road in Yalesville. The fair will run from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Anyone interested in having a space, and would like more information and a registration form, please call Diane at 265-5576.
YALESVILLE VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT CRAFT FAIR
Craft fair November 11, 2006, Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, 143 Hope Hill Road, Yalesville. Sponsored by The Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, American Cancer Society, Relay for Life Team
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Volunteers Wanted For Meriden Public Schools
The Meriden Public Schools Volunteer Program is currently seeking media help at two elementary schools. This opportunity would consist of helping the library/media teacher check out books with elementary students and other related media tasks. If you would like to help out and have some fun, please call, Nan L Despres, Coordinator of Volunteers at 634-7985. Other volunteer opportunities in the Meriden Public Schools also exist. One half-hour a week is all that is required. Training is provided. We will work around your schedule. All are encouraged to volunteer. Retirees and bilingual are very welcome.
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Connecticut VNA Announces Grand Opening of “The Art of Hospice Care” at NOMA Gallery in Middletown
Connecticut VNA’s Hospice has planned a grand opening celebration for the debut of their traveling art exhibit entitled, “Continuing the Journey - The Art of Hospice Care.” The public is invited to attend the opening of the exhibit on Friday, October 6, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the NOMA Gallery, 648 Main Street, Middletown. The exhibit is an extraordinary and powerful multimedia display depicting the use of the arts in hospice care. It is a collection of paintings, drawings, photography, poetry, shadow boxes and more that have been done with, for and about ordinary people at the end of their lives. The exhibit highlights the unique gifts patients and their loved ones have received through Connecticut VNA’s compassionate and supportive Hospice team. Susan Rosano, an Expressive Arts Therapist with Connecticut VNA’s Hospice team and an organizer of the exhibit, said the group wanted to show the public the incredible work that is being done with people at the end of their lives and how it can contribute to the process of emotional healing for family members and friends. “The poems we write with our patients -- the collages and drawings we help them make -- their hand castings -- all have become lasting memorials to them.” Marion Donahue, President of Connecticut VNA, said the exhibit will help people understand the major role art and art therapy can play in helping them cope with a terminal illness. “The strength and intensity of the arts and complementary services in end of life care are tangible through this dramatic collection. Our complementary therapies team put a great deal of time and energy into developing this exceptional exhibit and we are very proud of what they’ve accomplished.” “Completing the Journey: The Art of Hospice Care” will be on display at the NOMA Gallery through November 17, and will then be exhibited through various venues around the state. For additional information or to learn how you can showcase this traveling exhibit, please contact Susan Rosano at 203-679-5300.
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Meeting of Parent Support Group in the Naugatuck Valley Region for parents who have out-of-control adolescent and adult children. Tough Love St. Anthony's Church Routes 68 and 69 Prospect, CT Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
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Crafters Wanted
The Fatima Women's Club of Our Lady of Fatima Church, Yalesville is sponsoring a craft fair on Saturday November 11, 2006, in the parish hall from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and crafters are needed. Please call Sandy P. at 235-2639 or Sandy C. at 269-6498 for more details.
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CRAFTERS WANTED
The North Italian Home Club on 43 Thorpe Avenue in Meriden will be having its annual Holiday Craft Fair on Saturday December 9, 2006, from 9:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Crafters interested in renting space may call MaryAnn at 203-238-4143 for more information.
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EXHIBITIONS AND PROGRAMS: NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2006
The Gallery's main building, designed by American architect Louis Kahn, reopens to the public on December 10. The reopening will feature masterworks from the African, Asian, early European, and modern and contemporary collections, including important new acquisitions. Information about special events for the reopening will be sent out in October. In the meantime, exhibitions, gallery talks, and master classes continue in the Gallery's Swartwout wing; please see link to PDF for complete schedule.
The Gallery's Kahn building reopens to the public on December 10, 2006.The new exhibition "Jasper Johns: From Plate to Print" opens December 10.The new exhibition "Making a Mark: Four Contemporary Artists in Print" opens December 10. The new exhibition "Responding to Kahn: A Sculptural Conversation" opens December 10.
Complete calendar of events (PDF) is available at:
http://artgallery.yale.edu/pages/info/press.html
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Volunteers Needed for the American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk Sunday, October 15
Volunteers are needed for the 12th annual American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk on Sunday, October 15, 2006, at Bushnell Park in Hartford, CT. More than 250 volunteers are needed to help the Society make strides against breast cancer. Opportunities to help include greeting walkers, registration, distributing snacks and drinks, directing traffic and parking, setup and clean up. Individuals and groups are encouraged to become involved. If you have one or more hours to help anytime from 7:00 a.m. through the afternoon, please contact Kathy Maguda at 203.379.4875, via email at Kathy.maguda@cancer.org or in person at the American Cancer Society, 538 Preston Avenue, Meriden. Making Strides is the oldest and largest one-day walk in the nation to fight breast cancer. Funds raised support the American Cancer Society's breast cancer research, education, advocacy and patient support programs. For more information about Making Strides, visit www.cancer.org/stridesonline, call 1.800.ACS.2345.
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“A Night for Noah” Dance featuring Riverstreet
Saturday, November 18, 2006, Mountainside Outing Club, 8:00 p.m.
Ticket Info:
Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at the following locations in Meriden:
JC Music
529 West Main Street
Fishers Fine Foods
21 South Colony Street
Katz Sports Shop
519 West Main Street
Valencia Liquors
1231 East Main Street
If you are interested in purchasing tickets or would like to volunteer for this event, please call Kathy Showerda at 203/235-4508 or Nancy Crispino at 203/237-7908.
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INTERFAITH VOLUNTEER CARE GIVERS WALLINGFORD WANTED!
Volunteers to help frail, elderly neighbors shop, get to medical appointments, provide respite to a family member.
QUALIFICATIONS: People with a warm, loving heart and one or two hours of time each week. No hands-on care!
BENEFITS: Feel great about yourself! Have fun! Plan you own hours! Meet new people!
Become an Interfaith Volunteer Care Giver! Find out more by calling Marie Cunha, Social Worker, Wallingford Senior Center at 265-7753.
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MEDICARE PART D OPEN ENROLLMENT INFORMATION SESSION
Wallingford Senior Center, Thursday, October 26, 2006, 10:15 a.m.
The next opportunity to enroll in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan is November 15 through December 31, 2006. Even if you are already enrolled in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan please come learn about:
a. Medicare drug plan coverage for 2007b. How to switch from one drug plan to anotherc. Who gets "Extra Help"d. How does the "Coverage Gap" worke. How to delay or avoid reaching the "Coverage Gap"
Please register for this program by calling 265-7753; open to the public.
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COURSE FOCUSES ON FALL MIGRATION OF BIRDS
By popular demand, Guilford-based Sunrise Birding is offering another Fall Migration Bird Watching Course in October and November. Taught by instructor Gina Nichol, this course offers beginner and experienced bird watchers the chance to practice bird watching, gain experience, and improve bird identification skills with fall migrants, including shorebirds, raptors, sparrows, and more. Participants will learn how to use field marks, habitat, behavior, and sound as aids in identification. Through field observation, bird watchers will learn how to identify birds with confidence and gain knowledge of where and when to look for birds. The series of three outdoor sessions is offered on Tuesday mornings beginning October 31st and continuing on November 7th & 14th, 2006, from 8:00 – 10:00 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Park in New Haven. Lighthouse Point Park is a hotspot for bird migration through November. Many migrant birds including cave swallow, brant, long-tailed duck, red-breasted merganser, common loon and other waterfowl pass through the park on their southward journey. Other species possible can include rough-legged hawk, great-horned owl, and shorebirds, including yellowlegs and dunlin. The fee for the course is $69 per person. Discounts are available to supporters of local conservation organizations. Advance registration is required. For more information and to register, go to http://www.sunrisebirding.com/fall_migration_courseII.htm.
Sunrise Birding offers personalized, authentic, affordable travel adventures and learning opportunities intended to reveal the splendor and diversity of the natural world.
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Dear Business Owner:
As President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the North Italian Home Club of Meriden, I ask you to consider becoming a part of a memory. Our auxiliary is currently designing a game board devoted to celebrating our fine city and its 200-year history. The game is called SilverCityOpoly, and we are honored to be granted the right to make this game our City’s Bicentennial Edition.
You are invited to claim your spot, your square, your place on the 2006 Bicentennial SilverCityOpoly game board. There are numerous levels of participation. All property sales on the board will be sold strictly on a first-come, first-served basis. There is a list of the varied levels of sponsorship attached. All proceeds from the game sales will go to a building fund, which the Ladies have established in hopes of making improvement to our club’s grounds located on Thorpe Avenue, right here in Meriden.
Be one of the lucky folks who recognize what an incredible opportunity this is. For just a few cents per game board, you are placing a permanent advertisement to commemorate your business, your family name, the memory of a loved one or whatever you choose onto the board. That permanent part of our game board will be talked about, laughed about, played with and distributed to hundreds and hundreds of homes both within our city limits and beyond. Folks are bound to want to send our bicentennial edition to former city residents across the globe! With it will go your little piece of history?
Please place your order today. Time is of the essence. Be part of a very unique game board and be seen and heard from for years to come. Get in the game today by calling Sandy at 203-530-0236.
May you, your family and friends continue to thrive in Meriden as we all work to make our city a great place to live, work and play in. I thank you for your time.
Sincerely,
Cynthia D’Agostino, President, Ladies Auxiliary
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Platt High School Sports Card & Coin Show
Dates: December 2, 2006January 6, 2007February 3, 2007March 3, 2007April 7, 2007May 5, 2007June 2, 2007
Table info 203-634-0069 Ernie203-235-7962 x 139 Athletic office
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Colonial Tymes Christmas Fair Saturday, November 4, 2006 Relax for the holidays. Center Congregational Church, Meriden has been working hard to make life easier for you this holiday season. Come and shop for your decorations, gifts, and baked goods. We have created beautiful handmade crafts to decorate your home. We have been sewing, gluing, twisting, stuffing, and painting all summer to fill the tables of our next fair, coming soon. We will have homemade baked goods, and there will be apple pies baking all day, just for you. Have a sample, or take home a whole pie for your freezer, to heat and serve on your special holiday. Your company will think you worked in the kitchen all day. You will find handmade items, including Christmas ornaments, house decorations, and special gifts as you wander around to the different booths. Join us for a mid-morning snack of coffee and our famous sticky buns, or relax and enjoy a cup of our homemade soup with a sandwich for lunch. Then take the “Cookie Walk” where you can gather up your favorite cookies to fill your freezer and make the holidays deliciously easy. We will have pecans fresh from Georgia and cheese direct from Vermont. It doesn't get any fresher than this. With giant specialty theme baskets, a tea cup auction, craft tables, and a tag sale which includes baby clothes, we have something for everyone. There will also be unique activities to occupy the children, and our book sale is always an event. Proceeds from the Fair will be used to help maintain our historic church building, contribute to activities for our youth, and to further local and worldwide ministries. Come join us for this fun day. Center Congregational Church is located at the corner of Broad and East Main Streets, Meriden. Park in the back and come in the side door. The Fair will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on November 4, 2006.
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Giuffrida Park – Meriden, 800 Westfield Road
Giuffrida Park was originally part of an area farmed in the late 1600s and early 1700s by Jonathan Gilbert and later Captain Andrew Belcher. This farm, the first white settlement in this region, became know as the “Meriden Farm,” and from which the whole area eventually took its name.
Mount Lamentation was named in 1636 when a member of Wethersfield Colony became lost and was found by a search party three days later on this ridge, twelve miles from home. There is some controversy whether the Lamentation refers to his behavior or that of those looking for him.
In 1735 a group of local men leased land on the western edge of this mountain in an attempt to find gold, as quartz formations there seemed promising. None was ever found. The reservoir was built by the Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company for its use in the late 1800s. The dam was raised three feet in 1927. Eventually International Silver acquired the property, because it guaranteed the company a reliable source of water, which it used in great quantities in its manufacturing processes. After International Silver built its new factory on South Broad Street, it no longer needed the reservoir. As there was a shortage of water at the time, International Silver gave the city special permission to pipe into their now-unused reservoir.
The property was offered for sale, and the Connecticut Light and Power Co. (CL&P) purchased it in order to provide itself with the land to cross high voltage lines into the Westfield section of Middletown and beyond. CL&P then sold the rest of the land to the city, which bought it under the open spaces program.
The reservoir remains a backup water source today.
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Wallingford Rotary Club
The Wallingford Rotary Club meets Wednesdays, 12:10 p.m. at Brothers Restaurant, 33 North Cherry Street. We welcome guests to come, share lunch and enjoy our weekly speaker program. The cost is $12 per person. Rotarians are dedicated to “Service above Self” in our community, La Romana in the Dominican Republic, in the worldwide battle of Polio Plus, and the family of all. Come discover how Rotarians make a difference, every day.
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Volunteers Wanted
The Meriden Public Schools Volunteer Program is currently seeking media help at two elementary schools. This opportunity would consist of helping the library/media teacher check out books with elementary students and other related media tasks. If you would like to help out and have some fun, please call, Nan L Despres, Coordinator of Volunteers at 634-7985. Other volunteer opportunities in the Meriden Public Schools also exist. One half-hour a week is all that is required. Training is provided. We will work around your schedule. All are encouraged to volunteer. Retirees and Bilingual are very welcome.
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Quilt Show and Bake Sale
The Northford Congregational Church is holding a Quilt Show and Bake Sale, November 18th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. View over 30 handmade quilts on loan from area quilters and quilt owners. Many antique and modern quilts will be on exhibit. The quality and craftsmanship are a must see! Tickets are $5. After the exhibit, enjoy a complimentary dessert, coffee/tea in the social hall while you peruse the homemade desserts from the Bake Sale table and stock up for Thanksgiving! There will also be Quilting materials from Quadrille Quilting, LLC, on sale in the social hall. Raffle tickets for our homemade quilt, weekend in Vermont and other prizes can also be purchased. For Quilt Show tickets, you can call the church office at 484-0795 or you can purchase them at the door.
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Fun Events at the Wallingford Family YMCA
Friday Night Family Fit Club Come join us on the following Friday Nights to enjoy a family fitness activity. Each activity will also include a healthy snack. This is a great time for children and parents to stay fit together while having fun! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Parent's Night Out - Night on the Town This program is designed especially for children in grades K - 6. The program will take place every other Friday night from 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Kids will enjoy pizza and juice, games in the gymnasium, and swimming in the pool, while you spend some quality time together, without the kids! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Ghouls & Goblins of all ages, join us for a fun-filled Halloween afternoon adventure! Arrive in costume for a trick-or-treat parade, costume contest, creepy crafts, ghoulish games, a healthy snack and ghostly storytelling. Youth and Teens- Join us for a ghoulishly fun Halloween overnight adventure! The fun begins at 7:00 pm on Saturday evening and doesn't stop until 9:00 am on Sunday morning. Arrive in costume and enjoy a ghostly scavenger hunt, creatively cool costume show, splashingly fun swim adventure (bring your swimsuit) and fall asleep listening to ghastly ghostly storytelling. Take a journey through our spook house, if you DARE! Breakfast will be provided.
Child Care Fun Fair - Saturday, November 18th, 11:30 - 1:30 p.m. Come one, come all to our Child Care Fun Fair! There will be a variety of activities for your family including our fintastic fishing game, pin the feather on the turkey, and our famous YMCA turkey trot. Register at the Welcome Center between October 1st and November 1st. Upon registration, your family's name will be put in our raffle for our YMCA Child Care "Basket of Fun". The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Saturday, December 9th, 2:00 p.m.Limit 40. Place: Paul Melon Arts Center, Choate Rosemary Hall Appropriate for grades 1 - 7 This musical is based on C.S. Lewis' story about four children who enter the land of Narnia by mistake. Scuba Santa is Coming to Town Sunday, December 10th, 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Come enjoy a holiday craft and listen to the story “A Night Before Christmas.” Then go into our pool and help Scuba Santa decorate an underwater Christmas Tree

Highland School 23rd Annual Craft Fair Highland School PTO will sponsor its 23rd annual Craft Fair on Saturday, December 2, 2006 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the school on Highland Avenue in Wallingford. There will be over 65 vendors selling items, such as jewelry, paintings, florals, holiday ornaments, woodworking, quilts, gift baskets, candy,knitting, sweatshirts, centerpieces, photography, animal treats, et cetera. Refreshments will be available including homemade apple crisp. Admission is free. For additional information contact the school or call 203-314-3413.
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DVD/VHS Drive and Game Drive The Meriden Jaycees will be sponsoring a Children's DVD/VHS Drive and Toy Drive from October 1st through the 31st. Additionally, DVDs will be collected for the mothers to watch. All items collected will be donated to a local domestic violence shelter. Some of the requested items include: board games, card games, easy puzzles, Legos, et cetera. Items can be new or gently used. Boxes will be located at Meriden fire stations. The fire stations are located at 168 Capitol Avenue (South Meriden), 61 Pratt Street, 561 Broad Street, 260 Sherman Ave., and 1075 East Main Street. Any donations will be greatly appreciated. Please contact Sara at 464-7939 with any questions or for more information about this project. The Meriden Jaycees is an organization that offers members the best opportunities for community action, leadership development, and career advancement to men and women 21-40 years of age. New members welcomed.
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Maloney Band News
It's competition time again! Maloney High School Band performed in their first competition this year at Lyman Hall this past Saturday. All the students were very nervous and excited to be performing their show to the music of Tower of Power. They did a spectacular job in competition by placing 3rd in their division and 3rd overall. Following their performance the kids felt exhilarated and very proud of themselves, as was every parent and supporter in the stands. Special thanks to the Director, Brian Cyr, Colorguard Instructor - Caralyn Vicino, Colin Mason , Percussion Instructor Caption Head, Don Fortin, Percussion Instructor, and Irene Sheades , Pit Instructor. Without their dedication and support the band would not have been able to perform beyond their expectations.
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Meriden Public Library Children's Library Announcing two New FREE passes to Museums!! We are pleased to announce we have just received two new passes for museums at the Meriden Public Library in the Children's Room - Imagine Nation Museum in Bristol, CT. The place to spark your imagination! This museum has ESPN Play Your Way, Greenhouse, Jungle Playscape and Climbing Wall, Otis Teaching Elevator, Kid Construction Zone, Cook Nook, Water Room, Creative Arts Center, Cyber Lab, 1940's Soda Fountain, and much more. Hours are Wednesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Saturdays 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Sundays 12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. and open until 8:00 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. Our other pass is for Earthplace, the nature discovery center in Westport, CT. Earthplace maintains a 62-acre wildlife sanctuary with trails, live wildlife for public viewing, and it hosts many public nature program and events. It also has an explorer clubhouse, tiny tree house, nature lab, backyard resource center, nature theater, and wildlife dioramas. Explore the ecology lab, Animal Hall, Trails & Gardens. The grounds are open 7:00 AM. until dusk. Building open 9:00 AM.- 5:00 PM. Monday-Saturday. 1:00 PM.-4:00 PM. on Sundays. These passes can be taken out for two days with a library card and driver’s license. For more information call the Children's Library at (203) 630-6347.


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Meriden Children's Library Specials! November 13th - SCRAPBOOKING-6:30 p.m. Come to the Meriden Public Library and learn all about scrapbooking. For children in grades 2 and older, with adults welcome. Leticia Harduby, our staff professional scrapbooker, will be teaching children the art involved in scrapbooking. Bring your own personal items, such as recipes, pictures, or other items you would want to learn how to display with class. Sign up in the Children's Library, or call us at (203) 630-6347.
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Understanding Diabetes
The Village at Kensington Place and MidState’s Community Wellness Department will present a program entitled “Understanding Diabetes” on Monday November 13, 2006 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at The Village at Kensington Place. Jackie Hackbarth, RNC, BS, Clinical Coordinator at The LaPlanche Clinic will be the guest speaker. The program is free and open to the public. For further information, please call 237-0300.
PASTA SUPPER
The Civitan Club of Meriden/Wallingford will hold their 12th annual pasta supper to benefit the physically and mentally challenged youth and adults in the area on Wednesday, November 8th from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at St. Joseph Church, Rosary Hall, W. Main St. Meriden. Donation will be $7 for adults, $3 for children 6 to 12, and children 5 years and younger free. Tickets may be purchased at the door or from Norman Willmott at 634-0176.
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MERIDEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESS RELEASE
2 NEW EXHIBITS - 3 WEEKENDS ONLY - OPENING OCTOBER 29, 2006
THE MERIDEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS 2 EXHIBITS:
1. Meriden Personalities2. Halloween
The doors of the Andrews Homestead, the showcase of the Meriden Historical Society, will once again be open to the public with two new exhibits:
1. Meriden Personalities, depicting art and artifacts of randomly-selected famous Meriden personalities. They may have not all been born here – but Meriden is where they made their name, or Meriden was were they started out. People on display range from craftsmen and women, designers, writers, musicians, and people in sports.
2. Halloween exhibits Halloween artifacts, toys, etc. from the collection of members and friends of the Meriden Historical Society.
The two exhibits at the Andrews Homestead, will be open for a limited time only, between the hours of 1:00 pm and 4:00 pm: Sunday November 5, 2006Sunday November 12, 2006Or by appointment. The Andrews Homestead, 424 West Main St. Meriden, is the little red building located between McDonald's and Ben Franklin School.
CONTACT INFORMATION: Ms. Chris Ruel – Exhibit co-curator - 860-349-1046Submitted by Ruth Borsuk – President – 203-237-8042
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MERIDEN YMCA OFFERS AMERICAN RED CROSS BABY-SITTING CERTIFICATION COURSE
This certification program is designed for today’s 11- to 15-year-olds. This training course gives participants the knowledge, skills, and confidence to care for infants through school-aged children. This program addresses safety issues, preventing injuries and illnesses, basic child care, first aid, decision-making skills, and age appropriate behavior and play. Participants learn by doing and are required to demonstrate several first aid skills including rescue breathing and dealing with a choking victim. Class will take place on Saturday, December 9th from 9:00 - 4:00 p.m. Pre-registration is required. Please contact the Meriden YMCA at 235-6386 to register today!
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COME JOIN MERIDEN YMCA’S MASTERS ADULT SWIM PROGRAM
This program is designed for those adults 19 years of age and older who wish to work out with other adults accompanied by a certified swim coach. The purpose of this program is to promote fun, fitness, safety and possibly competition for all participants of whatever level of ability and interest. This program will run three days a week; Monday and Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:45p.m and Thursdays from 8:00 to 9:00p.m. through December 14th. Participants can start at any time. For further information or to register; please contact Lisa Hoover at (203)235-6386; ext 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.com
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Brian David Doenig of Wallingford has been Awarded the 2006 Milton Fisher Scholarship due to his Designing of a Memorial Garden
The 2006 Milton Fisher Scholarships for Innovation and Creativity have been awarded to Brian David Doenig, along with seven other Connecticut students in recognition of their successful efforts to solve problems in innovative ways or to encourage creativity in their communities. From a strong applicant pool, the selection committee chose eight scholarship award winners this year. Winners receive grants from $2,000 to $5,000, depending on financial need (although the winners are selected without regard to need, the amount of each grant depends on financial need). Five honorable mentions earned grants of $1,000 each. The scholarship was open to high school juniors and seniors and college freshmen from Connecticut. To be eligible, a student had to either attend high school in Connecticut or plan to attend college in Connecticut (or both). The winners were all students who showed unusual initiative and creativity. Their innovations were in fields that included the arts, public affairs, humanitarian crises, health, and sports. The scholarship program welcomes applicants who demonstrate creativity in any field. Doenig innovatively and creatively designed and remolded an abandoned lot into a memorial garden. These original ideas thus qualified him as one of the eight awardees of the Milton Fisher scholarship The Renee B. Fisher Foundation established this scholarship in memory of Milton Fisher, whose life was marked by a passion for innovative and creative problem solving that extended across a broad range of fields of endeavor. Milton Fisher was also passionate about encouraging others to take the initiative in finding innovative and creative solutions to the problems around them, in their personal and professional lives and in the lives of their families and communities. The scholarship is administered by The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven.
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Holiday Bazaar
“A Village Christmas,” South Meriden Trinity Methodist Church, 145 Main Street, South Meriden
November 18th, 9:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Handmade Grafts - Luncheon Café, Baked Goods - Jewelry
Contact: Edie Marcantonio ,235-4810 Nite – 235-5759 Daytime
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La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford
If you are nursing or planning to breastfeed your baby, please join La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford at our next meeting.
Meeting Topics Include:
Advantages of Breastfeeding to Mother and Baby Baby Arrives: The Family and the Breastfed Baby
The Art of Breastfeeding and overcoming difficulties
Nutrition and Weaning
Meeting Location: New Life Church, 92 Main St. South Meriden,CT
Meeting Dates: Third Wednesday Of each month at 9:45a.m.
Leaders: Jaime: 203-284-9735 Laura: 860-583-8996 Maryann: 203-630-0046
(Leaders are also available to answer breastfeeding questions over the phone. Please call for more information or directions)
La Leche League groups also meet in Cheshire, Hamden, Middletown, Rocky Hill and Southington. Call for more information or go online at www.lalecheleague.org
BABIES ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETINGS
North Haven Garden Club Holiday Luncheon
The North Haven Garden Club presents the 2006 Holiday Luncheon on Thursday, November 30th at 11:00 at the New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave. with a Boutique, Raffle and Gourmet Table. The Program will be “The Little Black Dress” with Bill Graham, floral designer and lecturer. Donations are $35.00. For reservations, please call 203-239-3656 by Nov 21st.
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PARENTS & KIDS FOUNDATION, INC. Of Wallingford
Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is a humanitarian and educational organization guided by the principles of faith and social responsibility, or “caring and sharing.” We serve people in the following ways: Counseling: is provided for individuals, families, women, couples, and children. A variety of support groups on various topics are offered. Call for appointments and schedule/description of activities. Recent groups: “Fun On Friday,” (art and conversation) “ Painting, Poetry, Pottery and Pizza” (women’s night out) “My Time” (nutrition, health, weight loss, exercise) Parenting / Family Education: “Raising Kids For Fun and Profit” is our trademark parenting program which focuses on communication and cooperation, discipline and decision making, rights and responsibilities, choices and consequences, and what it means to be “family.” Delivered with lots of humor and anecdotes. “We Are What We Eat or I Am A Chocolate Chip” is Nancy’s newest addition to the presentation developed because so many of our children and families are nutritionally deficient and in ill health. Chronic disease is out of control and most of it is nutritionally related and easily rectified. French fries are not vegetables. Broccoli is not a town in Italy. Fast Food on a plate is not a home cooked meal. An apple a day really will keep the doctor away and other truths I learned from my mother. Holiday Community Dinners: served Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, provide more than 500 meals each holiday. The meals are free. Transportation is provided as needed. Volunteers deliver meals and visits to the homebound, wrap presents, and write notes of encouragement. We strive to make everyone feel like they are “coming home” for the holidays. Much of the food is donated and completely prepared by volunteers. Come and join us. Adopt -A -Family grew from the holiday dinners. We have “adopted” individuals, families, nursing home residents without family, homeless shelter residents, and 100 children with AIDS. We sent holiday meals to residents in a home for the mentally retarded and gift baskets to their families. We provided materials and an instructor to a group of women learning to sew, and an artist to teach painting classes. As a need arises, we try to meet it. School Supplies Program: From paper, pens, pencils and notebooks, to backpacks, lunch boxes, sneakers, hats, gloves, jackets and more. Many children are provided the opportunity to begin their school year well supplied. Motivational Speaking: on Leadership, Communication, Positive Parenting, Nutrition and Health, and more. Guaranteed to send every audience out empowered. Focused and funny! Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is a private non-profit organization that believes children grow best in nurturing families. Nurturing families make nurturing communities. We are committed to strengthening people in all that we do. For more information on how you can become involved in any of our programs, please call. Together we can make such a wonderful difference! God’s peace and every blessing!
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Annual Holiday Festival
St. John Lutheran Church and Preschool proudly presents out Annual Holiday Fair Saturday, November 11, 2006, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.. We will have all new crafters and vendors, PLUS plenty of free, off-street parking, so come early for the great special. Come for lunch. Come for the homemade pies for sale, but please come and check out our newly expanded fair. St. John Lutheran Church & Preschool, 520 Paddock Avenue, Meriden, Ct.
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The Polish League of American Vets Chapter 189 Ladies Auxiliary Coming Events
November 13th,2006, we are going to see an afternoon of Divine Comedy, Father Aloysius and a superb lunch at John J. Sullivans Restaurant, full meal and dessert and tip included. Cost is only $64. Payment and signup is due two weeks prior to the trip at the Club 193 East Main St. Meriden. The bus leaves at 10:30 from Bee St. commuter parking lot, and returning around 3:30. See ya there!
December 2nd, 2006, come join us for the Festival of Lights and Father Pat and lunch at Morins. Visit the Shrine in Attleboro, Massachusetts, and then the Festival of Lights. See the Holiday Concert, enjoy Mass, the Nativity Set, gift shops, and a delicious lunch with the works at Morins Restaurant. We leave at 10:00 a.m. from Bee Street commuter parking lot and return about 9:00 pm. Tip and everything included. Cost is $53 and must sign up and pay two weeks prior to the trip at the Club on 193 East Main St. Meriden, Ct.
March 11th, 2007. We leave from the Bee Street commuter parking lot for Mohegan Sun Casino. The cost is $20. Includes free bet, free buffet. We leave at 8:00 a.m. and return about 5:30. Trip must be signed up and paid two weeks prior to the date at 193 East Main St. Meriden.
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We Are What We Eat
Cancer kills more children than any other disease. One in eight American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Heart disease kills more women than cancer. One in two men will have cancer in his lifetime. Americans spend $330 billion per year on heart disease. One in four children is obese. Most kids think French fries are vegetables. Some kids think broccoli is a town in Italy. This is the bad news. The good news is that most of these statistics will change if we simply change the way we eat. Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is sponsoring a six-week information and education series that will support people who want to improve the quality of their lives by changing the way we look at food. The program will be led by Nancy Freyberg, MA. Whether you are overweight and undernourished, tired of being sick and tired, thick or thin, trying to raise healthy kids in a junk food world, and feel like you are losing the battle, this program is for you. We will learn the difference between habits and heredity, treatment vs. prevention, how your body works when it takes food in, how to read labels, foods to always eat and those to never eat, truth and lies of advertising and how and where to shop. The best exercise and diet is the one you will do, so a personal program for your body type and personality will be designed. This is a program for real people who live in the real world and have to make real choices with the time, money and schedules they live with. Guest speakers will include a naturopathic physician, nutritionist, and fitness trainer. We will sample foods, share recipes, ask and answer all your questions and have lots of fun learning new ideas that really work. This program is for young people, senior citizens, and everyone in between. Two groups, limited to 10 participants in each, will meet 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, or 9:30 – 11:00 a.m. Saturdays. The cost is $75. Please call Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299 to register for the class An apple a day really can keep the doctor away!


RED SKELTON'S RECIPE FOR THE PERFECT MARRIAGE1. Two times a week, we go to a nice restaurant, have a little beverage, good food and companionship. She goes on Tuesdays. I go on Fridays.2. We also sleep in separate beds. Hers is in California and mine is in Texas.3. I take my wife everywhere..... But she keeps finding her way back.4. I asked my wife where she wanted to go for our anniversary. “Somewhere I haven't been in a long time!" she said. So I suggested the kitchen.5. We always hold hands. If I let go, she shops.6. She has an electric blender, electric toaster and electric bread maker. She said "There are too many gadgets and no place to sit down!" So I bought her an electric chair.7. My wife told me the car wasn't running well because there was water in the carburetor. I asked where the car was. She told me, “In the lake.”8. She got a mudpack and looked great for two days. Then the mud fell off.9. She ran after the garbage truck, yelling, "Am I too late for the garbage?" The river said, "No. Jump in!"10. Remember: Marriage is the number one cause of divorce.11. I married Miss Right. I just didn't know her first name was Always.12. I haven't spoken to my wife in 18 months. I don't like to interrupt her.13. The last fight was my fault though. My wife asked, “What's on the TV?” I said, “Dust!”Can't you just hear him say all of these? I love it.........this is the good old days when humor didn't have to start with a four-letter word........ Just clean and simple fun.


2006 MERIDEN HALLOWEEN HOUSE DECORATING CONTEST RESULTS
Results from the 2006 Halloween House Decorating Contest are as follows:
BEST AUTUMN THEME
13 Baldwin Avenue
100 Sandy Lane
91 Sylvan Avenue
MOST CREATIVE
67 Hillside Street
80 Silver Street
14 Finch Avenue
SCARIEST ENTRY
52 Clinton Street
48 Virginia Drive
61 Hillside Street
BEST OVERALL
1. 85 Linsley Avenue
2. 142 Schwink Drive
3. 248 Curtis Street

The Meriden Recreation Division would like to thank all entrants in this year’s contest for their effort & enthusiasm, and especially thank the Jessica Short – Maya Rain Purcell Memorial Foundation for sponsoring the event, and we look forward to your participation in our Holiday Decorating Contest.


Tulip Tour of Homes
The Wallingford Education Foundation has recently announced that they have begun working on their "Tulip Tour of Homes" to be held on Saturday, May 5, 2007. This tour has become a significant fundraiser for the Wallingford Education Foundation and is well attended by the Wallingford community and friends. It will again feature five to six homes to tour, and will include lunch at the Gouveia Vineyards on Whirlwind Hill. Anyone interested in offering their home for a tour, whether it be big or small, old or new, please contact Judi Gallagher at 203-715-1805 or Dave Baker at 203-269-5912.


Donate Your Car to Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Before winter arrives, Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Connecticut reminds people with unwanted cars that now is the time to donate. It’s a program designed to raise funds for MADD and is being conducted throughout the state.
Anyone interested in donating a car is invited to call (203) 234-6524. Whether your vehicle is running or not, you can donate a used car, truck, boat or RV to help support MADD's mission. MADD Connecticut can pick the vehicle up from your home or business, and whether wrecked or in mint condition, every vehicle has a value, and the donation of your vehicle will help MADD fund its lifesaving mission.
You get an IRS deduction, get free vehicle pickup, and avoid the headaches and cost of selling a used car -- and help support MADD, all at once!
For more information contact the MADD Connecticut Office at (203) 234-6524.


Health Net Medicare Program Informational SeminarWallingford Senior Center - Monday, November 13th, 10:15 a.m.Health Net is a Medicare Advantage Plan offering medical plans with and without built-in prescription drug coverage. Because not everyone is looking for the same coverage, Health Net offers a variety of plan options, each with different levels of coverage so you can select the plan that best meets your medical and drug needs. Their comprehensive medical and prescription drug plan premiums start as low as $0 a month. Most Medicare plans change from year to year. If you aren't sure if you're getting the health and prescription drug coverage you need, or want to compare your coverage with Health Net Medicare plans, mark your calendar to attend this seminar. Please call 265-7753 for reservations.


AMERICAN RED CROSS OFFERS TRAINING COURSES
The South Central Connecticut Chapter of the American Red Cross is currently accepting registrations for upcoming Health & Safety courses.
The American Red Cross Community lifesaving courses are designed to help responders feel more confident in their ability to act appropriately in the event of an emergency. The program includes information on topics such as First Aid, CPR, and preventing disease transmission. The program is comprised of courses for adult, child, and infant care.
The schedule of lifesaving classes offered at the Wallingford/Meriden Branch Office for November 2006 follows. Please call the appropriate office to register. Pre-registration is required.
Branch Office Classes: 144 South Main Street, Wallingford. 203-265-6721
Standard First Aid with CPR-Adult: November 18, 2006, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Additional information may be found on the American Red Cross website at www.arcsct.org



Don't miss out on the most festive Holiday Fair in town!
The Ladies of St. Anne Society of St. Laurent Church, 121 Camp St., Meriden, will host their Annual Holiday Fair on Saturday, November 18th from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m., and Sunday, November 19th from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Come Saturday to purchase the best variety of homemade cookies at our ever-popular "Cookie Walk" (with 30+ members baking them, there is always an interesting selection), then browse the craft/vendor tables where you can pick out that perfect item for Holiday gift giving or decorating. Choose from artificial arrangements from Hilzinger Farms, colorful baby quilts and bibs, Christmas wreaths and ornaments, cemetery boxes, crocheted items, jewelry, homemade apple butter, jelly, relish, "Gifts in a Jar" and "Hot Chocolate Cones" from St. Anne's Pantry ( all pantry items prepared by members of the Ladies of St. Anne Society), and much, much more. Plan on dining at the "Candy Cane Cafe" (open Saturday only) where you can order homemade pea soup or corn chowder, sandwiches, hotdogs or delicious French meat pie. Before leaving, be sure to take chances on the themed Basket Raffle - the quality and value of our gift baskets are superb! (Some of the proceeds from this event help support the Ladies of St. Anne knitting ministry which knit beautiful prayer shawls that are presented to parishioners and their loved ones dealing with a serious illness.) Plenty of off-street parking in the back of the church. Just follow the signs!


Lyman Hall Craft Fair
The Lyman Hall High School Music Parents Association will host a Holiday Craft Fair on Saturday, November 18, 2006 at the school. The hours of the fair are 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Over 50 crafters will offer a full line of unique and wonderful holiday gifts. The fair will feature American Folk Artist and Best Selling author John Sliney. Dozens of homemade crafts, as well as representatives from Mary Kay Beauty Products, Pampered Chef, Princess House, Gourmet To Go, and plenty more. Concessions provided by the Music Parents Association. Free admission and parking. Interstate 91 Exit 13 and follow the signs.


ANTIQUE VETERANS FUNERAL SERVICE
The Antique Veterans of Meriden Post No 1 was organized to give military veterans an opportunity to get together for brotherly socialization. They meet every Thursday morning at the Meriden Senior Center at 9:30. There are no dues. Coffee and pastries are served. Neil’s Donut Bake Shop in Yalesville donates pastries, and ShopRite donates the ingredients for coffee. Cotton tan work clothes were selected as a uniform to wear for special occasions. A special Antique Veteran emblem is worn on the right sleeve, and the member’s military unit emblem is worn on the left sleeve. Awards and decorations are also worn. Military rank is not recognized. Performing a military salute for deceased Meriden and Wallingford veterans has become an important activity of the group.
The United States Military believes that all veterans are entitled to a final military salute at their funeral. The situation in Iraq has put stress on finding active Army and National Guard troops to perform this service. The minimum military salute calls for two flag folders, a rifle salute, and the sounding of “Taps.” The Antique Veterans of Meriden has a graveside funeral service, which has a uniformed veteran holding the American Flag at the head of the entombment site. A row of uniformed veterans holding patriotic flags is lined up in back of the American Flag. A bugler plays “Eternal Father” as the pallbearers carry the casket to the entombment site. The military salute begins when the religious ceremony is over. It starts with a 3-volley 4-gun salute. A bugler sounds “Taps” as trained flag folders fold the casket American Flag into the proper triangle. It is then formally presented to the next of kin. Then the flag bearers march off as the bugler blows the theme song of the deceased branch of service. It requires 15 to 20 veterans to properly perform this service. The State of Connecticut has formed an organization, which will pay $250 per funeral if a group meets their minimum requirements. The Antique Veterans feel that it is an honor to perform this service for deceased veterans. They elected to forego joining the Connecticut group and not accept the $250 per funeral. Since “9/11,” the Antique Veterans of Meriden have performed at 456 funeral services and 89 in 2006 as of October 24.
Funeral directors ask the deceased veteran’s next of kin if they would like a military salute at the funeral. The directors generally recommend the Antique Veterans for this salute because they think that it is the best service. Sometimes two funerals are at the same time. This requires the Antique Veterans to work out a schedule so that they can rush from one gravesite to the other.
The current membership mainly consists of WWII veterans and a few Korean War veterans. The WWII veterans are mostly in their 80s. Sickness and passing of the aged has taken a toll on the membership. Retired veterans are encouraged to join the Meriden Antique Veterans Post No 1 to fill the ranks of those who have passed. Younger retired veterans are needed to continue this community service.

SEARCH FOR OWLS, EAGLES, AND WINTERING WATERFOWL ON THE CONNECTICUT SHORELINEhttp://www.sunrisebirding.com/walks.htmGuilford, CT -- Guilford-based Sunrise Birding will offer a series of Bird Walks in the coming months to witness the southbound journeys of raptors, shorebirds, and songbirds and learn about the avian winter residents of the central Connecticut coast. Join professional guide Gina Nichol to search for the bird life in varied habitats along the Connecticut shoreline. The Bird Walk schedule is as follows:
Friday, November 10, 2006 - 8 AM, Secret Shorebird Spot, Westbrook
Saturday, November 11, 2006 - 8 AM, Stratford Shoreline, Long Beach, Stratford Saturday, November 18, 2006 - 8 AM, Lower Connecticut River, Old Saybrook
Tuesday, December 12 - 3 PM, Sunset Walk at Silver Sands State Park, Milford
Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, MadisonTuesday, December 19 - 3 PM, Sunset Walk at Hammonasset State Park, Madison
Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, MadisonThursday, December 28, 2006 - 8 AM, Hammonasset State Park, Madison The schedule includes explorations of top birding sites in Connecticut. In November, birders will be treated to a "secret" spot in Westbrook that attracts many species of migrating and wintering shorebirds. There will also be an exploration of the Lower Connecticut River in Old Saybrook, where wintering Bald Eagles and sea ducks can be seen. In December, the walks will focus on the varied habitats of Hammonasset State Park in Madison which can play host to many late fall migrants such as Northern Gannet and winter residents such as Purple Sandpiper, Lapland Longspur, Horned Lark, Hooded Merganser, Bufflehead, Surf Scoter, Sanderling, and Red-throated Loon. There is also a special Sunset Bird Walk at Silver Sands State Park in Milford to look for wintering Short-eared Owls. The fee for each walk is $5 per person, and preregistration is required. Participants are encouraged to dress for the weather and bring binoculars, water, and spotting scopes (if available). Bird checklists will be provided free to participants. Register online at http://www.sunrisebirding.com/ or by calling 203.453.6724. Sunrise Birding offers personalized, authentic, affordable travel adventures and learning opportunities intended to reveal the splendor and diversity of the natural world.


We Are What We Eat
Cancer kills more children than any other disease. 1 in 8 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Heart disease kills more women than cancer. 1 in 2 men will have cancer in his lifetime. Americans spend $330 billion per year on heart disease. 1 in 4 children is obese. Most kids think french fries are vegetables. Some kids think broccoli is a town in Italy. This is the bad news. The good news is that most of these statistics will change if we simply change the way we eat.
Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is sponsoring a six-week information and education series that will support people who want to improve the quality of their lives by changing the way we look at food. The program will be led by Nancy Freyberg, MA. Whether you are overweight and undernourished, tired of being sick and tired, thick or thin, trying to raise healthy kids in a junk food world, and feel like you are losing the battle, this program is for you.
We will learn the difference between habits and heredity, treatment vs. prevention, how your body works when it takes food in, how to read labels, foods to always eat and those to never eat, truth and lies of advertising and how and where to shop. The best exercise and diet is the one you will do, so a personal program for your body type and personality will be designed. This is a program for real people who live in the real world and have to make real choices with the time, money and schedules they live with.
Guest speakers will include a naturopathic physician, nutritionist, and fitness trainer. We will sample foods, share recipes, ask and answer all your questions and have lots of fun learning new ideas that really work.
This program is for young people, senior citizens and everyone in between. Two groups, limited to 10 participants in each, will meet 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, or 9:30 – 11:00 a.m. Saturdays. The cost is $75. Please call Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299 to register for the class
An apple a day really can keep the doctor away!


Turner Construction Golf Tournament Benefit American Cancer Society
Turner Construction Company hosted the first annual Turner Fall Classic 2006 golf outing to benefit the American Cancer Society on October 16 at the Tournament Players Club at River Highlands in Cromwell. Rusty Hirst, VP and General Manager, and Gregg Scholler, VP Operations Manager, reported that the proceeds from this exclusive, invitation-only event would benefit the Society's Capital Campaign Program for Patient Navigation being launched at 4 Connecticut hospitals. Turner Construction reported they had 144 golfers that day. The Tournament raised in excess of $50,000, according to Mary Murphy, Major Gifts Officer for the American Cancer Society. "It was a beautiful day, the sun was shining, and everyone was happy to participate in an event to benefit The American Cancer Society," says Murphy. Don Gudaitis, CEO of the American Cancer Society said, "We can't thank Turner Construction Company enough for hosting this wonderful event, and thank them for raising so much money for such a great cause." Golfers representing the Society golfers included Tom Sellers, Randy Chase, Mickey Toro and Vincent DePaola. The American Cancer Society is dedicated to eliminating cancer as a health problem by saving lives, diminishing suffering, and preventing cancer through research, education, advocacy and service. Founded in 1913 and with national headquarters in Atlanta, the Society has 14 regional Divisions and local offices in 3,400 communities, involving millions of volunteers across the United States. For more information anytime, call toll free 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org.

AREA CHURCHES AND ORGANIZATIONS PLAN HOLIDAY FAIRS
As always, The Peoples' Press supports YOU! If you have an event for the Holiday Season – email it to us at andy@peoplespressnews.com.

MERIDEN – St. John Lutheran Church and Preschool is seeking crafters for its annual holiday fair, to take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 11 in the fellowship hall of the church, 520 Paddock Ave. Table space is $20, plus a donation from the crafter to the raffle table. For information, call Cathy at (203) 634-9344.
MERIDEN – A craft fair, sponsored by the Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department’s Meriden/Wallingford Relay for Life Team, will take place from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the fire station, 143 Hope Hill Road, Yalesville.
Crafters are needed. Anyone interested in table space may call Diane at (203) 265-5576 for a registration form.
MERIDEN – The annual Franciscan Christmas Fair will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Nov. 18 at the Franciscan Life Center, 271 Finch Ave.
The event will feature a living crèche with Christmas carols, Franciscan handmade and handcrafted items, Franciscan Christmas Bread, jams, jellies, pickles. Also offered will be children’s arts and crafts, basket booth and garden booth, roasted chestnuts, wreaths and Christmas trees. Refreshments will also be available to purchase.
For information, call (203) 237-8084.
MERIDEN – Holy Angels Church will sponsor its annual holiday bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 18 at the parish center, 585 Main St., South Meriden. Crafters interested in reserving table space may call Geri at (203) 237-8697.
MERIDEN – Wilcox Technical High School will sponsor its annual arts and crafts fair from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the School on Oregon Road.
MERIDEN – Thomas Edison Middle School’s Families As Partners Organization is seeking vendors for a holiday fair scheduled from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at the school, 1355 N. Broad St.
MERIDEN – The North Italian Home Club will sponsor its annual holiday craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dec.9 at the club, 43 Thorpe Ave.
WALLINGFORD – a HARVEST AND CRAFT FAIR WILL TAKE PLACE FROM 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the Yalesville United Methodist Church, corner of Route 68 and New Place St. in Yalesville.The event will also offer breakfast and lunch.
WALLINGFORD – Zion Lutheran Church will sponsor its annual holiday fair from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the church’s Fellowship Hall, 235 Pond Hill Road.
The event will feature arts and crafts, books, toys and games, jewelry, a bake sale and apple fritters. A tag sale will be offered by the church’s youth group. A soup and sandwich luncheon will begin at 11:00 a.m. Santa will also be available for pictures.
WALLINGFORD – The Fatima Women’s Club of Our Lady of Fatima Church will sponsor a crafts fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 11 in the parish hall on Hope Hill Road, Yalesville. Crafters are needed. For information, call Sandy Comeau at (203) 269-6498.
WALLINGFORD – Rock Hill School will present its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the school on Rock Hill Road. Interested crafters may receive information or an application by calling the school at (203) 949-0115.
WALLINGFORD – Parker Farms School will sponsor its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the school on Parker Farms Road. Interested crafters may call Jodi Bouza at (203) 294-0504 or 949-0349.
WALLINGFORD – The Lyman Hall High School Music Parents Association will sponsor a holiday crafts fair on Nov. 18 at the school. All proceeds will benefit the high school’s bands and choral groups. This year’s classes are planning to perform at Disney World in Orlando, Florida.
Crafters and artisans wishing to reserve space may call Dave Baker at (203) 269-5912 for registration applications.
WALLINGFORD – The East Wallingford Volunteer Fire Department will sponsor its annual holiday craft fair from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 25 at the firehouse, 2 Kondracki Lane. A raffle and food will be available.
Crafters are needed. For information, call Robert Bonvini at (203) 269-6176 or Steve Polek at 265-6853.
WALLINGFORD – Highland School will sponsor its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dec 2 at the school on Highland Avenue.
Any crafters interest4ed in an application or for more information, call the school at (203) 949-0121 or 235-0195.
SOUTHINGTON – Plantsville Congregational Church will sponsor its 16th annual “Ye Olde Country Fair” from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the church, 109 Church St., Plantsville. The event will feature handmade crafts, homemade canned and baked goods, cookie walk, silent auction, gingerbread village, raffles, used jewelry and books and a luncheon.
For information, call (860) 628-5595.
SOUTHINGTON – Grace United Methodist Church will sponsor its annual Christmas tea and crafts sale from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at the church, 121 Pleasant St.
The event will feature knitted and craft items, unique ornaments, gift items, homemade fudge, boxed Christmas cookies, including a luncheon with tea, coffee, punch, finger sandwiches and cookies.
For information, call (860) 628-6996.
SOUTHINGTON – a Christmas bazaar will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at The Summit at Plantsville, 261 Summit St.
Table space is available for $15. Crafters, artists and holiday vendors may register by calling Pat Conlan at (860) 628-0364.
SOUTHINGTON –Crafters interested in registering for the craft fair planned to take place from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Dec. 2 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 145 Main St. are asked to complete the paperwork for submission by Nov. 18.
For registration materials, call Ann at (860) 621-0926. The fee to reserve table space is $25.
SOUTHINGTON – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church will sponsor a craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Dec. 2 in the parish hall. All interested crafters are invited to participate.
Those interested in receiving a registration form with all of the details may send their name and mailing address to Charlotte Hinckley, c/o St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 145 Main St., Southington, CT. 06489.
CHESHIRE – St. Bridget’s Church will sponsor its annual craft and Christmas bazaar from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the parish center, 175 Main St.
The event will feature crafters, baked goods, penny auction, raffles, bottles booth, teddy bear booth, and food. Santa Claus will be available from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Any crafters interested in table space may call the rectory at (203) 272-3531.
CHESHIRE – A holiday bazaar will take place from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the Cheshire Senior Center, 240 Maple Ave. The event will feature handcrafted items, baked goods, attic treasures, free face painting, costume jewelry, luncheon menu, and new toys in Santa’s Kids Corner.
For information, call the senior center at (203) 272-8286.
MERIDEN - Craft Sale by local artisans Sat. Nov. 18 from 9:00 – 2:00 at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Meriden, 328 Paddock Ave. Baskets, jewelry, knitting, weaving, hooking, dog biscuits, porcelain dolls, photos and note cards, quilting, ornaments. Bake sale. Lunch available, including roast turkey sandwiches. Free admission.Contact person: Janet Hiller 203-238-0008 or janethiller@snet.net.

NORTHFORD - FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HOLDS FALL FAIRFaith United Methodist Church of 81 Clintonville Road in North Haven will hold its annual Fall Fair on Saturday, November 18 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Fair features handmade items, a Cookie Walk where kids of all ages can fill a decorated can with homemade cookies of their choice, used jewelry, homemade baked goods, and our new church cookbook. We will also be offering homemade pies and fun activities for the kids. In our Tea Room, a full breakfast will be served from 9:00 – 11:00 a.m., and lunch will be served from 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.


Church, Synagogue - Worship Times and Services
To add your Church or Synagogue to this free service – please email andy@peoplespressnews.com
MERIDEN – Center Congregational Church, 474 Broad St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service, 8:30 a.m.. chapel service (except first Sunday of month). (203) 235-1389.
MERIDEN – First Baptist Church, 460 Broad St., Sunday – 8 and 11 a.m. service; Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. (203) 237-5529
MERIDEN – First Congregational Church, 62 Colony St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service, sanctuary; Taiwanese Christian Church, 10 a.m., chapel; 1 p.m., worship with Casa De Gozo Church, Smith Hall (203) 235-5704 or www.fccmeriden.org.
MERIDEN – First United Methodist Church. 159 E Main St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service; 11 a.m., fellowship hour. (203) 235-9620
MERIDEN – Grace Fellowship Christian Center, 131 Windsor Ave., Sunday – 11 a.m., service; Sunday school, 10 a.m. (203) 235-5325.
MERIDEN – Holy Angels Parish, 585 Main St., South Meriden, Sunday – 8:30 and 11 a.m. Mass; Saturday – 5 p.m. vigil Mass (203) 235-3822.
MERIDEN – Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, 164 Hanover St., Sunday – 9:45 a.m. service; 8:30 a.m., Sunday school. (203) 238-1248.
MERIDEN –Life of Faith Ministries, 78 E. Main St., services: 7 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. Sunday. Call (203) 440-4258.
MERIDEN –New Life Church, 92 Main St., South Meriden, West Campus, Saturday: 6 p.m. service; 262 Bee St., East Campus. Sunday: 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. services (203) 238-1114.
MERIDEN – Olive Tree Fellowship, YMCA, 110 W. Main St., Sunday – 10 to 10:45 a.m. Sunday school; 10:45 a.m. to noon, worship service. Call (860) 827-1895.
MERIDEN – Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St. Laurent parishes; Saturday vigil – Mount Carmel, 4 p.m.; St Laurent, 5:15 p.m.; Sunday – 7:30 and 10:30 a.m. Mount Carmel; 9 a.m., St Laurent.
MERIDEN – St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 20 Catlin St, Sunday – 8 and 10 a.m. service; 9:30 a.m., Sunday School.
MERIDEN –St John Lutheran Church, 520 Paddock Ave., Saturday – 5 p.m. service; Sunday – 10 a.m. service; 8:45 to 9:45 a.m., Sunday School and adult Bible study (203) 238-2331.
MERIDEN –SS Peter & Paul Orthodox Church, 54 Park Ave., Saturday, 5 p.m. vespers; Sunday, 9:30 a.m. (203) 237-4539 or www.sspeterpaul.org.
MERIDEN – St. Rose of Lima Church, 35 Center St., Saturday – 4:30 p.m. vigil Mass; Sunday – 7:30 and 10:30 a.m. English Mass; 9 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. Spanish Mass. Call (203) 235-1644.
MERIDEN – South Meriden Trinity United Methodist Church, 145 Main St., South Meriden; Sunday – 10 a.m. service; 11:10 a.m., Sunday School. (203) 235-6002.
MERIDEN – Temple B’nai Abraham, 127 E. Main St. Friday – call for time (203) 235-2581; Saturday – 9:30 a.m.; Sunday – 9:30 a.m. (when religious school is in session); Thursday – 8 a.m.
MERIDEN – Unitarian Universalist Church, 328 Paddock Ave. Sunday, 10:30 a.m. service; Sunday School, 10:30 a.m. Call (203) 237-9297.
WALLINGFORD – Church of the Nazarene, 26 Parker Farms Road, Sunday – 10:45 a.m. service; 9:30 a.m., Sunday School (203) 269-9313.
WALLINGFORD – Congregation Beth Israel, 22 N. Orchard St., Friday, 6:45 p.m. services, Oneg to follow. Call (203) 949-8656.
WALLINGFORD – Door of Hope Community Church, 120 Church St., Yalesville, Sunday – 9 and 10:45 a.m. service; nursery, pre-school, children’s and student classes at each service. (203) 741-1001.
WALLINGFORD – E and R United Church of Christ, 105 S. Cherry St., Sunday, 10 a.m. service. (203) 269-4827.
WALLINGFORD – First Baptist Church, 114 N. Main St., Sunday – 10 a.m. service; Sunday School, 8:50 a.m. (203) 269-4796.
WALLINGFORD – First Congregational Church, 23 S. Main St. Sunday – 8 a.m., communion service; 10 a.m. service; 10 a.m. church school. (203) 265-1691.
WALLINGFORD – First United Methodist Church, 941 Old Rock Hill Road, Sunday – 8:30 a.m. communion service; 10:30 a.m. service; 9:15 a.m. Sunday School (203) 269-9100.
WALLINGFORD – Good News Christian Church, 46 John St., Sunday – 9 and 11 a.m. service; 7 p.m. Wednesday (203) 284-9383.
WALLINGFORD – St John the Evangelist Episcopal Church, 360 Church St., Yalesville, Sunday – 9:30 a.m. service. (203) 269-9526.
WALLINGFORD – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 65 N. Main St. Sunday -8 a.m. English Mass and 10 a.m. service; 9 a.m. Sunday School. (203) 269-5050 or www.stpaulswallingford.org.
WALLINGFORD – SS Peter and Paul Church, 127 N. Orchard St. Sunday – 8 a.m. English Mass and 10 a.m. English/Polish Mass. Saturday – 4 p.m. English Vigil Mass. (203) 269-4617.
WALLINGFORD – White Oak Baptist Church, 20 N. Whittlesey, Sunday – 9:15 a.m. worship; 11 a.m. Sunday school. (203) 265-3548.
WALLINGFORD – Zion Lutheran Church, 235 Pond Hill Road, Saturday – 5 p.m. service, Sunday – 10:30 a.m. service, 9:15 a.m., Sunday school and Bible studies. (203) 269-6847.
SOUTHINGTON – Faith Baptist Church, 243 Laning St., Sunday – 11 a.m. service; 9:45 to 10:45 a.m., Sunday School. (860) 628-8147.
SOUTHINGTON – First Baptist Church, 581 Meriden Ave., Sunday – 10 a.m. service
SOUTHINGTON – First Congregational Church. 37 Main St., Sunday – 8:00 a.m. chapel communion; 9:30 a.m. service; 11:15 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. contemporary service; Tuesday – Taize worship, 6:30 to 7:00 p.m. (860) 628 -6958.
SOUTHINGTON – First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 232 Bristol St., Sunday – 9:30 a.m. service; Sunday School, 9:15 a.m. (860) 628-9001.
SOUTHINGTON – Grace United Methodist Church, 121 Pleasant St., Sunday – 8:30 and 10:00 a.m. services: 10:15 a.m., Sunday School. (860) 628-6996.
SOUTHINGTON – Plantsville Congregational Church, 109 Church St., Sunday – 10:00 a.m. service, 8:30 a.m. Taize service. (860) 628-5595.
SOUTHINGTON – St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 145 Main St., Sunday – 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. service; 9:00 a.m., Sunday School.
CHESHIRE – Cheshire Lutheran Church, 660 W. Main St., Sunday – 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. services; 9:10 to 10:10 a.m. education hour. (203) 272-5106.
CHESHIRE – Cheshire United Methodist Church, 205 Academy Road, Sunday – 10:45 a.m. worship service; 9:30 a.m. Sunday school. (203) 272-4626.
CHESHIRE – St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 59 Main St., Sunday – 8 a.m. Rite I; 10 a.m. Rite II. Call (203) 272-4041.
CHESHIRE – Temple Beth David, 3 Main St., 7:30 p.m. service Friday, except first Friday of month when family services are at 7 p.m. Call (203) 272-0037.


Enter Essay Contest to Win New Playground for Hubbard Park!(Deadline is November 30th)Please help our community win a new barrier-free handicapped accessible playground for Hubbard Park! Hasbro is sponsoring an essay contest offering a $300,000 BoundlessT Playground for one grand prize winner's community, and online gift cards valued at $125 each for 20 finalist prize winners. Submit an original 500- to 750-word essay by November 30th, along with the completed entry form. One entry per family. Go to www.hasbro.com/playskool, click on In the Community/ Boundless Playground for contest rules and entry form. For more information about the new Hubbard Park Playground project email Dawn at hubbardparkplayground@peoplespressnews.com or send an email to NoahsARKofHope@yahoo.com


News from Cook Hill School
The Cook Hill Playground Committee is pleased to announce that our goals have been achieved! After a year and a half of hard work and perseverance, our new playground area is almost complete.
With the monies raised by our Committee, students and families, we have been able to purchase many exciting new elements for physical fitness and fun at Cook Hill. A few other purchases will be made in the early spring completing our overall plan.
While the Committee wishes to thank the many people and businesses who generously donated to our campaign, we would like to also recognize our “Platinum Donors.” Their names will be listed on a special Plaque of Appreciation soon to be placed in our school lobby area. They are:
Adam Manicone/Nickelodeon “Let’s Just Play”
The Snyder Family
Shaws Supermarkets
Curves of Meriden
Due Amici Salon
Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield
United Concrete Products, Inc.
Street Rod Steve’s Garage
Wal-Mart of Wallingford
Rotary Club of Wallingford
Chromalloy CT
Super Stop & Shop, Wallingford
Curves International, Inc.
Central CT Carpenters Local 24
Alesia Manicone & Doreen Gilhuly – Playground Committee Co-Chairs


A Night of Laughter
The Meriden Jaycees present A Night of Laughter with comedian Paul Venier. Some of the comedians Paul Venier has performed with include Jay Leno, Howie Mandel, and Paul Reiser. He has performed on The Tonight Show, HBO, and Comedy Central. Paul Venier's website is www.comedytornado.com. The event will be held on Friday, Nov.24th at Il Monticello located at 577 S. Broad Street (Rte.5) in Meriden. The price is $25 per ticket and includes appetizers. A table for ten is $225. There will be a cash bar. Advanced ticket purchase is recommended. Available tickets will be sold at the door. Please contact Katie at (203) 676-2718 or Sara at (203) 464-7939 for ticket information or any questions regarding the event. The event is for people 21 and over.
The Meriden Jaycees are a group of 21- to 40-year-olds dedicated to community service and leadership development. New members are always welcomed.



Winter Concert
The MIDDLESEX HOLPITAL VOCAL CHORDS are proud and honored to present their 17th Annual Winter Concert on Saturday, December 2, 2006 at Middletown High School, 331 Hunting Hill Avenue at 7:30 p.m.
Gina Fredericks, Choral Director, has put together a musical program that will delight all who attend. Fifteen weeks of rehearsals, 75 members, two accompanists, and five instrumentalists are sure to get you in the holiday spirit!
Tickets are $15 adult; $12 for seniors and children under 12. Start a holiday tradition! Call soon as this event is always a sell-out! 860-346-8045 or 860-342-3120.


WLT Fall Cleanup
The Wallingford Land Trust will have a fall cleanup on Saturday, Nov. 18, 9:00 a.m. at two sites: Orchard Glen and Fresh Meadows I. Meet at Orchard Glen sign/kiosk off of Barnes Park North, off of Route 68. Meet at Fresh Meadows at the kiosk/cul-de-sac of Jeremy Woods Drive off of School House Road near Cook Hill School. Bring water and snacks. Work details will be in drizzle or shine, but not in hard rain. Bring tools. Wear appropriate clothing for various terrain (long pants, gloves, boots).
For more information please call Joe Palazzi at 284-2394.
Please check out the website at wallingfordlandtrust.org for more detailed information on the sites and other land trust links.


Come Join the Fun at Girls Inc. - Winter Registration is Here.Girls Incorporated of Meriden, located at 130 Lincoln Street, will begin registration for its winter classes Monday, December 4th at 9:00 a.m. Winter classes will begin on January 2nd and will be offered for 11 weeks. Girls Inc. is offering a number of programs, so be sure to check our brochure. Some of the classes being offered are Cooking, Scrapbooking, Quilting, Economic Literacy, Media Literacy, Wacky and Funky Crafts, and much more. If everything sounds like way too much fun and you don't know what to take, come join our House Sampler and try a little bit of each program. This program allows you to sample all of the above for two days over a 10-week period. Girls Inc. also has Gymnastics, Dance, Yoga, and Cheerleading. Girls Inc. has a number of exciting National Programs that will provide hands-on interactive fun learning in the areas of Science, Math and Relevant Technology, Sports and Health Fitness. The National Programs really allow the girls to get involved in subject matters that are geared just for girls. Girls Inc. is also launching Saturday classes! If you are a working parent and can't get here during the week, come and sign up for our Saturday dance or gymnastic classes! A 2006-2007 Girls Incorporated membership ($30 nonrefundable) is required to be current at time of registration. Membership and class fees are due at time of registration. Girls Inc. accepts cash, checks, MasterCard and VISA.
Girls Incorporated is a nonprofit organization that inspires all girls to be strong, smart, and bold. Girls Inc. is a premier organization that inspires girls to work to their full potential and exercise their rights through program-based curriculum. Girls Incorporated of Meriden is a United Way member agency.



COME TO A “FALL BALL”
The Wallingford Junior Woman’s Club invites women to their “Fall Ball,” a prospective member social, on Thursday, November 9, 2006, from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., at the Wallingford Park and Recreation, 6 Fairfield Boulevard, Wallingford.
No gowns or dressing up is required! But just come “as you are” to find out about an “Awesome” Organization – the Wallingford Junior Woman’s Club! We are women of all ages – who love to help out the Wallingford Community in traditional philanthropic social events and unique specialized events too! We give Back to our Community that we have come to love. In fact, we are asking prospective new members, like yourself, to come and bring a Ball for the Wallingford Day Care Center! Balls of all shapes, sizes, kinds – could be in a board game, an infant toy, all the way up to playground balls!
Please come and say hello to us and help out the day care center too. For further information, contact Mimi LaFrance, Membership Chairwoman (203-284-8544), or Kathy Schave, President (203-949-1638).


Feeding Winter Birds is Subject of Continuing Ed CourseDuring the cold winter months, feeding wild birds can provide exciting and enjoyable opportunities for close observation of many fascinating species. How can you encourage wintering birds to take advantage of offerings at your bird feeder? The East Shore Region Adult & Continuing Education (ERACE) program is offering a special course for people interesting in learning more about feeding wild birds in winter. The course, entitled Feeding Winter Birds, will be taught by professional naturalist Gina Nichol, on Monday, November 20, 2006, from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. at Branford High School. This class will cover feeder placement, maintenance, seed preferences and the best types of food to offer, how to deal with squirrels, and what birds you can expect to see. The fee for the course is $22 per person, and registration is through East Shore Region Adult and Continuing Education. For more information and to register contact the ERACE (East Shore Region Adult and Continuing Education) Office at 203.488.5693 or Email: baeoffice@snet.net Web: http://www.erace-adulted.org/Photo attached: Northern Cardinal at a feeder in winter. Photo by Gina Nichol. Event Details:FEEDING WINTER BIRDSMonday, November 20, 2006 (Note: This is a date change from November 2.)7:00 - 8:30 p.m., Branford High SchoolERACE (East Shore Region Adult and Continuing Education) 185 East Main Street, Branford, CT 06405 Phone: 203.488.5693 Email: baeoffice@snet.net Web: http://www.erace-adulted.org/


"Christmas on the Hill " Holy Angels Holiday BazaarSaturday, November 18th, 9:00 to 3:00585 Main Street, South MeridenCrafters, Food, Baked Goods, Penny Auction, Children's Corner & a Visit from Santa! Donate a canned good for our Soup Kitchen & receive a chance for our Penny Auction.


Making a Good Gift Better
New Gift Incentive Matching Grant Program for Agencies Serving Basic Needs in the Greater New Haven Community
The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven announces the “Making a Good Gift Better” program. This program is designed to encourage nonprofit organizations to strengthen their operational and development capacities. These activities will focus on increasing resources by fundraising, planned giving, and endowment building.
The program is open to established nonprofit organizations actively serving needs of residents of Greater New Haven by providing for basic needs, including food, clothing, and shelter.
The Community Foundation will match on a one-to-one basis up to $5,000 of new contributions, which can be requested and documented during the final quarter of 2006 and first quarter of 2007. A total of $50,000 has been allocated to the “Making a Gift Better” program. The maximum matching gifts to any single agency will be $5,000. Agencies must raise a minimum of $1,000 in combined new giving to qualify for the initial matching grant. Qualifying contributions received from Oct. 1, 2006 through Dec. 31, 2006 will be eligible to receive matching funds. Qualifying contributions are new gifts from individuals, institutions and corporation, including some types of irrevocable planned gifts.


Square dance lessons offered
Wallingford – The Cheshire Cats Square Dance Club will offer square dance lessons from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church, 360 Church St., Yalesville. For information or to register, call Barbara Brown at (203) 237-9599 or Bernice Montefusco at 269-2569.

Don’t miss this Quilt Show and Bake Sale
The Northford Congregational Church is holding a Quilt Show and Bake Sale, Nov. 18 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. View over 30 handmade quilts on loan from area quilters and quilt owners. Many antique and modern quilts will be on exhibit. The quality and craftsmanship are a must see! Tickets are $5.
After the exhibit, enjoy a complimentary dessert, coffee/tea in the social hall while you peruse the homemade desserts from the Bake Sale table and stock up for Thanksgiving!
There will also be quilting materials from Quadrille Quilting, LLC, on sale in the social hall. Raffle tickets for our homemade quilt, weekend in Vermont, and other prizes can also be purchased.
For Quilt Show tickets, you can call the church office at 484-0795 or you can purchase them at the door.

*****I think some of these are repeats, Andy *****

VFC’s Relay team sets craft fair
Meriden – A craft fair, sponsored by the Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department’s Meriden/Wallingford Relay for Life Team, will take place from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the fire station, 143 Hope Hill Road, Yalesville.
Crafters are needed. Anyone interested in table space may call Diane at (203) 265-5576 for a registration form.
Craft fair Nov. 18 at Rock Hill School
Wallingford – Rock Hill School will present its annual craft fair from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 18 at the school on Rock Hill Road. Interested crafters may receive information or an application by calling the school at (203) 949-0115.
Fairs on the way at Holy Trinity
Wallingford – Holy Trinity Church will sponsor an arts and crafts fair from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday in the church hall, 68 N. Colony St. The event will also feature a country kitchen and homemade pies.
Also, a parish craft fair will take place from 8:00 a.m. to noon Nov. 5 in the church hall. All crafts will be made by parishioners. Free refreshments will be available.
Holiday fair Nov. 11 at Zion Lutheran
Wallingford – Zion Lutheran Church will sponsor its annual holiday fair from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 11 at the church’s Fellowship Hall, 235 Pond Hill Road.
The event will feature arts and crafts, books, toys and games, jewelry, a bake sale and apple fritters. A tag sale will be offered by the church’s youth group. A soup and sandwich luncheon will begin at 11:00 a.m. Santa will also be available for pictures.
Volunteer Fire Department to hold holiday fair
Wallingford – The East Wallingford Volunteer Fire Department will sponsor its annual holiday craft fair from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Nov. 25 at the firehouse, 2 Kondracki Lane. A raffle and food will be available.
Crafters are needed. For information, call Robert Bonvini at (203) 269-6176 or Steve Polek at 265-6853.
Come support our soldiers!
On Saturday Nov. 11, Veterans Day, The Southington Elks Lodge along with WTIC-AM Personality Jim Vicevich, Sgt. Melissa Weaver, President of Connecticut Supports Our Soldiers (www.ct-sos.org) and Cartoonist Guy Gilchrest will be collecting items for our Soldiers.
Collection will take place at the Southington Elks Lodge, 114 Main St., Southington, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Some items of need are CDs, DVDs, headphones, CD and/or DVD players, Chap Stick, sun block, reading materials, AA and AAA batteries, socks, blankets, playing cards and powder.
Help support our soldiers. For a complete list please go to www.ct-sos.org.
AARP Meriden Chapter 2954 will sponsor the following trip
Mohegan Sun and “A Holiday Cabaret Show” in New London, Nov. 29. Cost is $44 per person, and includes motor coach transportation; five hours at Mohegan Sun Casino; all-you-can-eat buffet or $10 food credit; $20 surprise casino bonus; 4:00 p.m. show at the Garde Arts Theatre in New London; a snack pack lunch (second meal); all taxes/service charges/tip for driver.
Call (860) 628-7717 for reservations or info. This trip is also open to the public.
Annual church fair
The women of the Middlefield Federated Church are busy getting ready for their annual Holiday Fair. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Nov. 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. for homemade goodies. Look for baked goods, Christmas decorations and gifts, jams and jellies and of course pie of every variety with your breakfast or lunch!
Mistletoe Magic Holiday Bazaar
The Orchard Valley Garden Club of Southington presents its fourth annual Mistletoe Magic Holiday Bazaar featuring crafts, baked goodies, plants, candies and wreaths and greenery, plus a variety of other marvelous gift items, including a fabulous raffle of interesting items and goodie baskets! Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at The Orchards Community Room 34 Hobart St.,(off Rt. 10), Southington.
Crafters, call for a space
Parker Farms Annual Craft Fair, Nov. 18, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Interested crafters please contact Jodi Bouza 294-0504 or 949-0349.
Vendors still welcomed
The annual Christmas Bazaar at The Summit at Plantsville will be held Saturday, Dec. 2 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Crafters, artists, holiday vendors may call Pat Conlan at The Summit (860) 628-0364, 261 Summit St., Plantsville, or stop by to register. There is a $15 fee to reserve a table. This event includes the sale of hot dogs, chips, soda, hot chocolate, and there will be raffle prizes.
Katy’s Wallyworld Walker’s Annual Wine Tasting
You are cordially invited to Katy’s Wallyworld Walker’s Annual Wine Tasting to benefit The American Cancer Society Relay For Life 2007, Friday, Nov. 10, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Hungarian Club, 147 Ward St., Wallingford. Tickets are $20. Raffle, appetizers, and many wines. For tickets please contact: Katy Wall, 294-0675 or Amy Blakeslee 265-3117.
Antique Veterans of Meriden World Post No. 1
All honorably discharged veterans from all branches of military service are invited to come join us and take part in our activities. Coffee and pastries are provided for a small donation. There are no membership dues. Please feel free to come and visit us every Thursday morning at the Muravnick Senior Center 22-26 West Main St. Meriden at 9:30 a.m. We are open to all veterans worldwide regardless of where you reside.
For more info contact Richard Egan (203) 634-0474 or Kenneth Dow (203) 235-2120.




Connecticut Food Bank Sponsors “Thanksgiving for All” Campaign Annual Food Drives and Fundraisers to Provide Meals & Hope to Thousands of Families

Connecticut Food Bank (CFB), partnering with local media, grocery stores and businesses, has launched “Thanksgiving for All 2006,” a series of special events, food drives and fundraisers to benefit individuals and families in need of food assistance during the holiday season and the cold winter months that follow.
The turkeys and “trimmings” collected from these events will be distributed by Connecticut Food Bank to food-assistance programs in the days before Thanksgiving. The funds raised will be used to purchase additional holiday food and to pay for transporting, warehousing, and distributing the donated food.
Last year, CFB distributed 22,000 turkeys and 415,000 pounds of food, which provided an estimated 318,500 meals for people in need during the holiday season. Every event planned for the next month is critical, not only to collect food and funds, but also to increase awareness about the ongoing battle with hunger and poverty that many Connecticut residents face.
“The people of Connecticut are always very responsive to their neighbors in need. With the increasing number of people turning to food-assistance programs for help, we hope this year is no different,” says Nancy L. Carrington, Executive Director of Connecticut Food Bank. “We need to collect as many frozen turkeys and other food items as possible for families and individuals who might not have a holiday meal, or any meal, this time of year.”
“Thanksgiving for All 2006” events include:
WPLR/99.1 “Fill the Bowl” Food Drive. November 8-11. Donate a frozen turkey, four food items or $10 and receive 2 tickets for Saturday’s Yale vs. Princeton football game. WPLR will broadcast live throughout the drive. Wednesday and Thursday, 6:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.; Friday, 6:00 a.m. to midnight; Saturday, 7:00 a.m. to noon. Shop-Rite Supermarket, 1131 Campbell Avenue, West Haven.
“Fill the (Yale) Bowl” Food Drive. November 11. Presented by WPLR 99.1, WTNH/News Channel 8, Yale Athletics, and the New Haven Register. Donate a frozen turkey, four food items or $10 before the game and receive 2 tickets for that afternoon’s Yale vs. Princeton football game. 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 kickoff. Yale Bowl, 250 Derby Avenue, New Haven.
Governor’s Care & Share. November 13 - December 18. Collection sites for non-perishable food items and monetary donations at state office locations throughout Connecticut.
Bank of America “Turkey Tuesday.” November 14. Drop off frozen turkeys, non-perishable food items, and/or a monetary donation at the bank branch. 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 157 Church Street, 26th Floor, New Haven.
KC101 “Stuff A Bus” Food Drive. November 17 & 18. Donate frozen turkeys, non-perishable food items, and/or funds. KC101 will broadcast live throughout the drive. Friday, 6:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.; Saturday, 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Shaw’s Supermarket, 2100 Dixwell Avenue, Hamden.
WELI Car and Van “Caravan of Carriages” with Jerry Kristafer. November 20. 960/WELI Morning Show host Jerry Kristafer will lead a caravan of donated food from Stop & Shop on Leetes Island Road in Branford to CFB’s East Haven warehouse. Bring frozen turkeys and non-perishable “trimmings” to donate and join the caravan! Begins at 11:00 a.m.
Star 99.9 “Food for Friends” Thanksgiving Food Drive. November 21. Donate frozen turkeys and food for those in need while meeting Star 99 radio personalities at Stop & Shop Supermarket locations in Danbury, Milford, Shelton, and Westport. 5:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Also, CFB warehouses in East Haven, Fairfield, and Waterbury will have extended holiday hours to accept food and monetary donations from the public, and for volunteers to help sort and distribute food to member programs before Thanksgiving.
For event or warehouse information or to volunteer at Connecticut Food Bank, call (203) 469-5000 or visit www.ctfoodbank.org.
Connecticut Food Bank serves emergency feeding programs in six of Connecticut's eight counties: Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London and Windham. In 2005, Connecticut Food Bank distributed 16.6 million pounds of food to 650 charitable food programs, including food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, and child and adult day-care programs.



Volunteer Opportunity for Meriden, Southington and Wallingford GrandparentsMeriden Children First Initiative's 'Senior Buddy Readers' intergenerational literacy program is currently seeking volunteers to help first- and second-graders improve their reading skills. If you are retired, enjoy the company of small children, and have one hour a week to help a child read, please call Children First at 630-3566. Meriden elementary schools in need of volunteers include: Ben Franklin, Israel Putnam, Thomas Hooker and Nathan Hale. Make a difference in the life of a child...become a Senior Buddy Reader!



Wallingford Public Library News and Events
Due to reconstruction, the WPL Children’s Room will not be able to offer any events. While we are not able to provide the programs we normally have, we can assure patrons that they will still be able to choose from an ever-expanding collection of books, CDs, DVDs and other materials. They will find brand-new titles as well as their old favorites and, of course, the holiday books and music. Many free booklists are available, and staff members are always happy to help find what is needed. Speaking of the approaching holiday season, the Wallingford Public Library, throughout the month of November, will be collecting new children's books for Wallingford's Holiday for Giving Program.Sincerely, Bonnie Strickland-Naczi, Children's Librarian

Aging and Emotions, What to Expect. Topic of Lunch and Learn Program on November 9.Erica DeFrancesco, occupational therapist at Masonic Healthcare Center in Wallingford, will present a program on Aging and Emotions, What to Expect on Thursday, November 9. The Lunch and Learn program will take place at 11:30 a.m. at Ashlar Village, Cheshire Road, Wallingford. Lunch and Learn programs are provided for seniors and their caregivers as a public service by the Wallingford Public Library and Masonicare, Connecticut's leading not-for-profit provider of senior healthcare and retirement living. Because of current construction at the Library, the Lunch and Learn program is being held in the Activity Room at Ashlar Village. The program will start at 11:30 a.m., and a complimentary lunch will be served. The programs are free, but seating is limited. Those wishing to attend are asked to make a reservation by calling Masonicare toll free at 877-424-3537 by Tuesday, November 7.




United Way Day of Caring
On September 12, 2006 a total of 328 corporate volunteers from 18 companies came together to participate in the United Way of Meriden and Wallingford’s annual Day of Caring event. These corporate volunteers performed 2,502 hours of volunteer service at 27 local agencies.
In addition to lending a helping hand, the corporate volunteers gained a team-building experience. What a difference corporations can make, by volunteering to work with populations in need and making our communities an even greater place to live. Those who gave of their time and service through the 2006 Day of Caring made a huge impact.
As a result of this experience, the volunteers were afforded an opportunity to learn about the partner agencies supported by United Way of Meriden and Wallingford, and see firsthand how the United Way of Meriden and Wallingford helps people right here in community.
Working on a Day of Caring project provides a unique opportunity for a United Way donor to see their donation at work. It offers an up close and personal experience with the agency and the clients they serve. We have volunteers that request the same agency year after year due to relationships built during previous Day of Caring events.
Examples of the improvement projects taken on during the Day of Caring include: electrical work ~ landscaping ~ painting ~ baking with seniors ~ reading to children ~ organizing a food pantry ~ painting a playscape ~ attic organization ~ and much more.
Special recognition to the following companies who participated in the 2006 Day of Caring event: 3M Health Information Systems, Amphenol Corporation, Atlantic Guest Company, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Canberra Industries, Inc., Connecticut Hospital Association, CUNO, Cytec Industries Inc., First Coast Service Options, H. Pearce Company Realtors, Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Masonicare, MidState Medical Center, Ulbrich Stainless Steel Corporation, Verizon Wireless, Wallingford Rotary, Wal-Mart, Webster Bank

La Leche League Of Meriden/Wallingford
If you are nursing or planning to breastfeed your baby, please join La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford at our next meeting.
Meeting Topics Include:
Advantages of Breastfeeding to Mother and Baby
Baby Arrives: The Family and the Breastfed Baby
The Art of Breastfeeding and overcoming difficulties
Nutrition and Weaning
Meeting Location: New Life Church (West Campus) 92 Main St., South Meriden
Meeting Dates: Third Wednesday of each month at 9:45 a.m.
Leaders: Jaime: 203-284-9735. Laura: 860-583-8996. Maryann: 203-630-0046
(Leaders are also available to answer breastfeeding questions over the phone.
Please call for more information or directions. La Leche League groups also meet in Cheshire, Hamden, Middletown, Rocky Hill and Southington. Call for more information or go online at www.lalecheleague.org. BABIES ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETINGS

“Monkey bars, castles, and rainbow slides”
Hubbard Park Playground Ideas on Display at Meriden Public Library
Announcement
Come see the wonderful playground ideas dreamed up by Meriden’s school children for the New Hubbard Park Playground, in a new exhibit in the Children’s Department at the Meriden Public Library, on display until the end of November. The artwork was created at the Kids Playground Design Party at Meriden’s Autumn Fest, and captures wishes ranging from traditional playground items, such as swings, slides (straight, twisty, squiggly, rainbow, and humongous), monkey bars, seesaws, and sandboxes, to creative additions such as Ferris wheels, water slides, castles, “twisty pole ride,” and a giant starfish to climb on.
For more information about the new playground email Dawn at hubbardparkplayground@peoplespressnews.com,

About the Hubbard Park Playground Committee
Mayor Mark Benigni appointed the Hubbard Park Playground Committee in June 2004. Working as volunteers under the Meriden YMCA, the committee’s mission is to build a barrier-free playground for children of all abilities to play side by side. The Hubbard Park Playground Committee works hand in hand with Noah’s Ark of Hope, Inc. to make the dream of a barrier-free playground at Hubbard Park a reality.

The Connecticut ASA Hall of Fame honors Ellen Biercevicz-Piazza of Wallingford
The Connecticut ASA Hall of Fame has announced its honorees for its 2006 class of inductees for the Fast Pitch wing of the newly merged softball Hall of Fame. The Slow Pitch and Fast Pitch committees announced the merger in August.
Both the Fast Pitch and Slow Pitch honorees will be recognized at the annual Hall of Fame awards dinner on Sunday, November 19th at 4:00 p.m. at Costa Azzurra Restaurant in Milford. Tickets are $35 and can be purchased by calling Ed Austin at 203-878-4036 or Jim Consiglio at 203-996-5206.
The Fast Pitch inductees for 2006 are Anthony Candido of Milford, Pat Dufficy of Trumbull, Ellen Biercevicz Piazza of Wallingford, and Bobby Quinn. Hank Koritkoski of Middletown will receive the Joseph T. Barber Distinguished Service Award.
Piazza has been a pioneer in girls’ sports as a softball player, an initiator of girls’ sports, a high school and college coach, and an athletic director. She played for the Raybestos Brakettes from 1966-1970, and was the catcher for a quartet of pitchers that may have been the best of all time: Joan Joyce, Bertha Ragan Tickey, Donna Lopiano and Donna Hebert. During her five years with the Brakettes, she competed in the National Championship finals five times, winning two national titles.
Starting her softball coaching career at Seymour High School in 1970, Piazza later became the first softball coach at Albertus Magnus College. She also coached her daughter’s 12 & under team to State & New England Championships. Piazza has been the A.D. at Lyman Hall High School in Wallingford since 1994. She is a Shelton native.

Friday, November 03, 2006

Copyright Information

The People's Press,Your Town, Your News, Your Views and all versions on said name are © Copyright DNA,LLC. 1999-2006, All Text, Logos, Images and other content in print or on the web © Copyright DNA, LLC 1999-2006.

Monday, October 23, 2006

The Late October Issue

To our Loyal Writers and Submitters: Please be aware that in our print issue there was a press problem that limited us to only 24 pages. Your stories and news are important to us so we have moved up the next issue to be sure that all of your items are covered as they should. Even if it costs us money...we care enough to do the right thing. The deadline is October 31st. You may email andy@peoplespressnews.com for submissions. You may email dawn@peoplespressnews.com or chrissy@peoplespressnews.com for help with advertisements. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to call 203.235.9333

Health News

Meriden Health Dept.
Meriden Health Department Offers Social Group for New Moms
The Meriden Health Department will be offering a free social group for new moms and moms-to-be who quit smoking during their pregnancy and want to stay smoke-free for their new baby.
This 10-week group will include sessions on how to manage stress, candle and jewelry making, how to start an exercise program, as well as tips and demonstrations on how to make healthy, quick meals. New moms and moms-to-be will also gain insightful tips on how to stay smoke-free from women who have been in their shoes.
This free group will be held on Tuesdays from 10:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m., and will start on October 3, 2006. Free babysitting will be available, and nutritious snacks will be served at each session. To learn more about the program, please call Debbie Roman at the Health Department, at 203-630-4104.

Keep those Ghosts and Goblins Safe this Halloween
Safety Tips for a Safe Halloween
Children should:
Go only to well-lit houses and stay on porches – do not go into homes or apartments.
Travel in small groups with an adult.
Know their phone number and carry coins for emergency telephone calls.
Have their names and addresses attached to the inside of costumes.
Bring treats home before eating them so parents can inspect them.
Use costume knives and swords that are flexible, not rigid or sharp.
When walking in neighborhoods, they should–
Use flashlights, stay on sidewalks, and avoid crossing yards.
Cross streets at the corner, use crosswalks (where they exist), and do not cross between parked cars.
Stop at all corners and stay together in a group before crossing.
Wear clothing that is bright, reflective, and flame retardant.
Consider using face paint instead of masks. (Masks can block a child's vision.)
Avoid wearing hats that will slide over their eyes.
Avoid wearing long, baggy, or loose costumes or oversized shoes (to prevent tripping).
Be reminded to look left, right, and left again before crossing the street.
Parents and adults should–
Supervise the outing for children under age 12.
Establish a curfew (a return time) for older children.
Prepare homes for trick-or-treaters by clearing porches, lawns, and sidewalks and by placing jack-o-lanterns away from doorways and landings.
Avoid giving choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys as treats to young children.
Have trick-or-treaters eat a meal before they go out - this way they will be less tempted to eat treats before they are checked for safety.
Inspect all candy for safety before children eat it. When in doubt, throw it out.

Healthy Teeth = Healthy Smiles!
October is National Dental Hygiene Month
Early oral health care is very important for healthy smiles. But how early should care start? This article will address this and other questions surrounding children’s oral health care.
When Should I Start Caring for My Child’s Teeth?
Dental care should start before a baby’s first tooth appears. Just because you cannot see the teeth doesn’t mean they are not there. Running a damp washcloth (or gauze pad) over your baby’s gums following feeding can prevent buildup of damaging bacteria. Once your child has a few teeth showing, you can brush them with a soft child’s toothbrush (but with no toothpaste) or rub them with gauze at the end of the day.
What Kind of Dentist Should My Child See?
You may want to take your child to a dentist who specializes in treating children. These dentists are called “pediatric dentists.” Pediatric dentists are trained to handle the wide range of issues associated with your child’s dental health.
How Can I Prevent Cavities?
It is recommended that your child’s first visit to the dentist take place by his or her first birthday. Here are some things to ask your child’s dentist to prevent cavities:

Ask about the use of topical fluoride when all of your child’s first teeth have come in (usually around age 2 ½ ). Fluoride hardens the tooth enamel, helping to prevent cavities.
If your water supply is not fluoridated, ask your dentist if you should use supplements.
Ask about the use of sealants as your child’s permanent teeth grow in.
Also, follow these tips:
Brush at least twice a day and floss routinely (this goes for kids and adults!). Children as young as age 2 or 3 can begin to use a pea-size amount of toothpaste, as long as they are supervised. Your dentist can recommend when to start using toothpaste.
If your baby needs a bottle to sleep, do not put anything in it but water. Sugar from juice or milk can stay on the baby’s teeth for hours and harm your baby’s teeth.
Your child will be saying “cheese” in no time!


BARIATRICS (Weight Loss Program)
Please call to register and for location directions, 203-694-8343

Bariatric Program Seminar
Tuesdays, October 25, November 14 and December 12
6:30 – 8:30pm
The seminar is an opportunity for individuals considering bariatric surgery to meet with our Bariatric Team and learn about the option of weight loss surgery. Dr. Benbrahim will cover the medical/surgical aspects of obesity and the benefits of weight loss surgery; Our dietician will talk about nutritional issues with a focus on post-op diet; Our pharmacist will briefly discuss medication issues and there will be a discussion on behavioral/emotional aspects of the surgery.
Please call for location.
Registration Required
203-694-8343



Meriden Health Department News and Events
There is a new movement in Meriden – an anti-litter movement!
Is there an area in your neighborhood that you would like to help keep clean? Why not "Adopt-A-Block" that could use some tender loving care (TLC)? If you are livid about litter, the City of Meriden invites individuals, youth organizations, and community agencies to do something about it by adopting a block in their neighborhood.

Meriden Adopt-A-Block is one of multiple projects being undertaken by an anti-littering committee, under the leadership of Councilwoman Patricia Lynes, consisting of various city departments and organizations in Meriden. The goal is to have city blocks “adopted” and kept litter-free by involving organizations and agencies throughout Meriden. When individuals and groups get involved and adopt-a-block, all Meriden residents enjoy these benefits:

Improved quality of life in our neighborhoods. The appearance of our community contributes to the quality of life we all share.
Litter-free, more attractive communities that help discourage unwanted and illegal activity.
An area watched and cared for by concerned residents and groups.
Pleasant reminders of the importance of litter control and prevention.

Becoming Involved in anti-littering campaigns increases citizen responsibility, ownership, and pride, and provides role modeling for children and the entire community. It is a great way for youth to receive city-wide recognition for participating in community service, often needed for graduation requirements.

The committee needs the help of everyone if we are to keep Meriden clean. If you are interested in learning more about Meriden’s Adopt-A-Block program and other anti-littering activities being planned, please call Lea Crown, Health Educator, at the Meriden Health Department, 630-4238.

A Breath of Fresh Air – October 25 is Lung Health Day

The Meriden Health Department wants to encourage healthy habits that pay off with lung health for life. Even though our lungs are on the inside of our body, how healthy they stay depends a lot on what happens on the outside of the body!
Follow these tips not only on October 25 but year-round for good lung health:
Tip #1 – Don’t Smoke!
It seems obvious, but it is worth restating: smoking is harmful to your entire body, and the habit usually starts harming your lungs first. So if you are a non-smoker, keep up the good work. If you do smoke, call the Health Department at 630-4104 to learn about how you can quit.
Tip #2 – Eat Your Fruits, Vegetables, and Drink Water
Fruits and vegetables are high in antioxidants like Vitamins A, C and E, and health professionals agree that it's best to get them from your food rather than from supplements. Staying away from processed foods in general is good for your lungs and your overall health. Water is good for your lung health, too. The lung tissue is moist and when we exhale, we lose moisture so we have to drink water to replenish it.
Tip #3 – Breathe the Cleanest Air Available
Smoggy, polluted air isn't really good for anyone, but those with compromised lung function particularly need to avoid alert-worthy conditions and high allergy days by opting for good indoor air. Avoid the outdoors during peak traffic hours and exercising or working outside on days when pollen counts are high. It's also a good idea to avoid breathing secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke can cause those who do not have lung disease to develop symptoms and in some cases the same diseases as smokers such as lung cancer and emphysema.
Tip #4 – Move it or Lose it
Endurance exercise, walking, bicycling, gardening, and other sustained activity is very beneficial, in fact it is one of the best things you can do to keep your lungs healthy, other than not smoking.
For more information on lung health, please call the Meriden Health Department at 630-4238.




FLU VACCINATIONS AVAILABLE THROUGH MERIDEN HEALTH DEPARTMENT
The Meriden Health Department will offer the influenza (flu) vaccine on the following dates:
November 1, 2006 9:00am – 12:00pm Meriden Senior Citizens Center 22 West Main Street
(Seniors over 60 years of age and chronically ill residents encouraged to attend)
November 8, 2006 2:00pm-6:00pm Meriden Health Department 165 Miller Street
(Open to all Meriden residents, including City of Meriden and Board of Education employees)
November 15, 2006 9:00-12:00pm Meriden Senior Citizens Center 22 West Main Street
(Seniors over 60 years of age and chronically ill residents encouraged to attend)
The cost of each inoculation is $20.00. Medicare Part B will be accepted. Any persons allergic to eggs or any part of the flu vaccine are not eligible for the vaccination.
All vaccination dates are by appointment only. Please call the Meriden Health Department at 630-4234 to make an appointment.

Library News and Events

MERIDEN CHILDREN’S LIBRARY SPECIALS! FREE PROGRAMS! SIGN UP!
October 30th HALLOWEEN PARTY at 6:30 PM.
Come to our Halloween Party. Wear your costume and join in on the fun. Great stories, fun games, exciting crafts, delicious snacks, contests and lots more. For ages 3 and up. Sign up in the Children’s Library or by calling (203) 630-6347.
November 13th SCRAPBOOKING at 6:30 PM.
Come to the Meriden Public Library and learn all about scrapbooking for children in grades 2 and older with adults welcome. Leticia Harduby, our staff professional scrapbooker will be teaching children the art
involved in scrapbooking. Bring your own personal items such as recipes, pictures, or other items you would want to learn how to display with class. Sign up in the Children’s Library or call us at (203) 630-6347.

Meriden Library News and Events
“WHERE IS THE MONEY?” A PANEL DISCUSSION ON ACCESS TO BUSINESS CAPITAL FOR NEW AND PROSPECTIVE BUSINESS OWNERS SCHEDULED FOR OCTOBER 25
Meriden Public Library will host a panel discussion called “Where is the Money? Access to Business Capital for New and Prospective Business Owners on Wednesday, October 25 at 7:00 p.m.
Panelists will be John Lobon, Connecticut Development Authority; Daniel DeRosa, Castle Bank; P. Edgardo Tarrats, Small Business Administration; and Donna Wertenbach, Community Economic Development Fund.
The event is co-sponsored by the Hispanic Members Outreach Committee of the Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce and Castle Bank and Trust Company, Meriden. Light refreshments will be provided, through the generosity of Castle Bank.
Daniel R. DeRosa is senior vice president and senior lender of Castle Bank and Trust Company. DeRosa has been employed in banking since 1981, serving the business community in Central Connecticut. He began his banking career with Hartford National Bank/Shawmut Bank holing various positions in Cash Management and Commercial Lending for Southington Savings Bank.
DeRosa received his B.S. and M.B.A. from the University of New Haven. He is a member of the Middlefield Town Committee and past member of the Middlesex YMCA Board of Finance. DeRosa is active in community and youth organizations, having served as Cubmaster for Cub Scout Pack 33, a Director for Coginchaug Little League, Wallingford Fall Baseball League and the Durham/Middlefield Recreational Basketball League. He is also an active participant in the Cheshire and Southington Chambers of Commerce. DeRosa and his family reside in Middlefield.
John Lobon is senior vice president and senior loan officer for the Connecticut Development Authority’s URBANK Small Business Lending Program. The Connecticut Development Authority is a quasi-public state agency created in 1973 to provide financial assistance to Connecticut businesses.
Prior to joining the Connecticut Development Authority in 1993, he held positions in state government and the banking industry. Lobon is a 1973 graduate of Syracuse University and Williams College Graduate School of Banking in 1980, and Term Lending to Small Business program conducted by the National Association of Government Guaranteed Lenders, Inc. in 1992. Lobon was appointed by Governor M. Jodi Rell in June in 2005 to be a Commissioner on the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.
P. Edgardo Tarrats joined the U. S. Small Business Administration in June 1997 as Chief of the Portfolio Management Division, after 15 years with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). As Chief PMD, Tarrats was, until recently, responsible for the day to day operations of the Portfolio Management Division, which handled the processing of loan guaranty purchases and liquidation functions of the Connecticut District Office.
Upon the transfer of the PMd functions to the new National Guaranty Purchase Center in Herndon, Virginia, Tarrats was assigned to supervise one of two teams responsible for loan processing, the 8(a) business development program and the Business Information Center. Tarrats is also the liaison between the Connecticut lenders and the National Guaranty Purchase Center.
While employed at the FDIC, Tarrats occupied various managerial positions in its Division of Liquidation, including Operations Department Head of the San Juan, Puerto Rico Consolidated Office. In 1988, Tarrats was transferred to the Denver, Colorado, Consolidated Office, where he served as Assistant Section Chef, Asset Marketing, and Liquidator in Charge of a failed financial institution. Tarrats attended the Catholic University of Puerto Rico and the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus, in his native Puerto Rico.
The program is free, but seating is limited; for free registration, please call (203) 630-6349 or send an email to: comsvc@hotmail.com or sign up at the online calendar at www.meridenlibrary.org
ENTERTAINER IRV PLASTOCK TO PRESENT “SING ALONG WITH IRV” AT JOHN BARRY SATELLITE BRANCH OCTOBER 25 Entertainer Irv Plastock will present “Sing Along with Irv” at Meriden Public Library’s John Barry Satellite Branch on Wednesday, October 25 at 6:00 pm. Children, ages 2 to 6 and their parents or caregivers are welcome to attend.
Irv Plastock is an accomplished artist who has been singing and performing for audiences for over five decades. At the age of eight, he made his debut playing the lead role of Frank in “Annie Get Your Gun.”
Irv performs his acapella children’s sing along program, titled, “Sing Along With Irv,” at libraries, preschools and day care centers. He presently performs in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Colorado.
His program is geared towards children ages two through six. The length of the program is forty-five minutes to one hour. After his program, Irv always spends time talking to the children. He says it always means a lot to him personally when a child tells him they had a good time and gives him a “High 5.”
Irv sings 31 songs during his program. Some of the songs are: If You’re Happy and You Know it, The Wheels On The Bus, The Green Grass Grows All Around, All Around, Where is Thumbkin?, Old MacDonald Had A Farm, The Farmer In The Dell, Bingo, Row, Row, Row Your Boat, Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star, I Am A Pizza, and On Top Of Spaghetti.
Irv’s credits besides Frank in “Annie Get Your Gun”, are Oliver in “The Vagabond King”, Bennie Kidd in “The Desert Song”, Mr. Macy in “Here’s Love” (the musical version of “Miracle On 34th Street”), Herman in “Most Happy Fella”, Bellomy in “The Fantasticks”, and Nicely, Nicely in “Guys And Dolls.”
LOCAL AUTHOR JOAN BARBUTO TO SIGN COPIES OF "GOD IS WITH US: SIGNS IN OUR LIVES" NOVEMBER 2 Meriden Public Library will host an appearance by local author Joan M. Barbuto on Thursday, November 2 at 12 noon. Barbuto will sign copies of her latest book, GOD IS WITH US: SIGNS IN OUR LIVES. Everyone is invited to attend. What happens to us after we die? In her book "God Is With Us -Signs In Our Lives" Joan Barbuto gives evidence that there is a God who loves us and a form of existence after death. She draws the evidence from five sources. (1) Unexplainable, seemingly miraculous events and signs in people's lives, including her own; (2) reports of angels, miracles, heaven and miraculous healings reported in books, including the Bible; (3) apparitions of the Virgin Mary in the last two centuries, with accompanying miracles witnessed by many and prophecies that came true; (4) incidents in the lives of two saints canonized in this century; and (5) investigations of near-death experiences and death-related visions by noted psychologists and psychiatrists. Joan M. Barbuto is an author and former journalist who has done extensive reading and research on religion, near-death experiences, apparitions of the Virgin Mary and spiritual experiences that people have had. She was a staff reporter, feature writer, and health and mental health reporter for a daily newspaper, THE NEW HAVEN REGISTER, and now writes about topics that interest her. With graduate degrees in English and education, she has the ability and training to research and organize a great deal of material on various subjects. She is also the author of the book "The ABCs of Parenting" (c. 1994) and is working on a historical novel. The program is free and the public is invited to attend. Light refreshments will be served. Since seating is limited, free registration is requested by calling (203) 630-6349 or by sending an email to: comsvc@hotmail.com or by signing up online at the events calendar found at www.meridenlibrary.org.
IRVING MOY TO RE-ENACT LIFE OF MERIDEN CIVIL WAR SOLDIER JOSEPH PIERCE IN BICENTENNIAL PERFORMANCE NOVEMBER 8 Meriden Public Library will feature Civil War re-enactor Irving Moy in a special Bicentennial performance on Wednesday, November 8 at 7:00 p.m. Moy will reenact the life of Joseph Pierce, a Chinese Yankee soldier from Meriden who fought in the Civil War. The event, which is free, is co-sponsored by the Friends of Meriden Public Library. There were many immigrants who fought in the Civil War. Regiments were formed to capture the ethnic pride each had to fight for a country they adopted for the cause of Union. There were the Italians and French of the "Garibaldi Guard", the Scottish "Highlanders" and the most famous, "the Irish Brigade." But few people know of the participation of the Chinese with the most famous Chinese soldier being Joseph Pierce, who lived in the City of Meriden. Sold at the age of 10 to a sea captain, fought in the Civil War with the 14th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, Army of the Potomac at Antietam and Gettysburg, later settling in Meriden as a silver engraver, don't miss this opportunity to see and hear Irving Moy (a Chinese-American Civil War re-enactor) make Joseph Pierce come alive in his presentation, "Joseph Pierce, a Chinese Yankee Soldier." Irving Moy is also the author of a compendium of research on the subject of Joseph Pierce, which is located in the Local History Collection of Meriden Public Library. Moy, a graduate of Washington University and Fairfield University, is a Public Health Services Manager with the State of Connecticut Department of Public Health. His interest in the Civil War is the result of a life long interest in and the study of the life of Abraham Lincoln. He thanks his wife, Julie, who also has an interest in this Nation's history for allowing him to live out his passion and fascination with Lincoln and the Civil War Era. The program is free and the public is invited to attend. Since seating is limited, free registration is requested by calling (203) 630-6349 or sending an email to: comsvc@hotmail.com or signing up at the online calendar at www.meridenlibrary.org


Wallingford Public Library Association Annual MeetingWednesday, October 25th at 7:15 p.m. as Ashlar VillageWFSB news anchor Al Terzi, the “dean of Connecticut television,” will be the keynote speaker at the 126th Annual Meeting of the Wallingford Public Library Association. * Library Co-Directors Leslie Scherer & Karen Roesler will share highlights from the Library’s history and will give a progress report on the on-going renovation project. * Officers and Board members will be elected at a brief business meeting. * Dessert will be served following the meeting.
Readers’ Theatre: The Footsteps of Doves and I’m Herbert. - Two One-Act ComediesTuesday, October 24th at 7:00 p.m at Ashlar Village
Wallingford Public Library and Ashlar Village are joining forces to present two one-act plays by Robert Anderson, The Footsteps of Doves and I’m Herbert.In The Footsteps of Doves an older man and his wife Harriet go shopping for a new bed. Harriet wants to buy two single beds, while George argues his point to keep a double. I’m Herbert is about an aging married couple who have both had a few previous husbands or wives. With a slip of the tongue, the names and places of the past get very confusing.These plays will be presented as Readers’ Theatre. The “actors” will be reading their parts and the set will be minimal. Actors for this evening of light-hearted entertainment are: Lois Reid, Barbara Pratt, Larry Brill, and Sue Smayda.The Footsteps of Doves and I’m Herbert were originally produced as part of You Know I Can’t Hear You When the Water’s Running. Robert Anderson is a well-known playwright whose works include Tea and Sympathy, The Days Between, and I Never Sang For My Father.American Masters - Playwrights
This fall Wallingford Public Library will be celebrating the work of four American masters: Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Sam Shepard, and Tony Kushner. One play by each of these authors will be discussed on every other Monday evening at 7:00 beginning on October 2nd.Mark Johnston, Professor of English at Quinnipiac University, will lead discussions. The schedule for discussions is as follows: ~ October 30th ~ True West. Sam Shepard’s play tells the story of two brothers: Austin, a Hollywood screenwriter, and Lee, a small-time criminal. The play’s encounter between the brothers explores the duality of human personality, and our primal capacity for violence. ~ November 13th ~ Angels in America. This play, by Tony Kushner, explores “the state of the nation”—the sexual, racial, religious, political, and social issues confronting the country during the Reagan years, as the AIDS epidemic spreads.Copies of the plays will be available at the Information Desk. Call the Library at 203 265-6754, or stop by the Information Desk to sign up for this free series.For those interested, filmed versions of Death of a Salesman, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and Angels in America are also available
Fall in the Children’s Room
This October, the Children's Department will be wrapping up its fall story time series and getting ready for the first of two big moves. In December we expect to be moving downstairs to the meeting Room, while the upstairs is being renovated. Following the renovations we will move upstairs to our new quarters on the south side of the building.As a result of these necessary changes, the Children's Room will be unable to offer story times and other programs until we have set up downstairs, and until the additional new small program room becomes available. We will miss all our friends during story times but we hope you will all continue to visit us and take out lots of your favorite books in the meantime.Our smaller temporary Children's Room will be fully functioning and even have a train set, donated by TOYZ of Cheshire, which we know everyone will enjoy. And as always, there will be lots of great books, DVDs, and more waiting for you.
Fall Story timesThe story times held in the Library are over for now and we appreciate everyone's patience as we moved the location of all the programs all over the library this fall! We are now going to be able to offer a Wednesday morning story time at a new location! The WE CARE Family Resource Center at Youth and Family Services has offered to let us use their facility for three drop-in story times. This is a drop-in program for kids ages 3 to 5 and younger siblings are welcome to attend. Please join us for stories, songs, finger plays and other activities! For more information call the Children's Room at the Wallingford Public Library. 265-6754. October 18th and 25th, and November 1st10:00a.m. to 10:45 a.m.The WE CARE Family Resource Center at Youth and Family Services is located at 6 Fairfield Blvd.


Wallingford Public Library Tile Wall Mural
The Town of Wallingford has provided $12,065,000 to build a state-of-the-art public library and the Wallingford Public Library Association is launching a campaign to raise $500,000 to furnish and equip this wonderful new civic space.
A mural of tiles sponsored by individuals, businesses, and organizations will be a cornerstone of this fund-raising campaign. The tile mural will tell the story of Wallingford – past and present, and will recognize donors to the furnishing fund. Renowned ceramic artist Marion Grebow has been commissioned to create this permanent public art installation.
Sponsor a Tile
Help furnish the expanded Library and celebrate Wallingford's past, present and future! We invite you to help create a work of art to commemorate Wallingford's story from its agricultural beginnings to the modern community it is today. The artist’s hand-sculpted bas-relief picture tiles will be based on historical research and resources. Tiles will depict actual events, places, and native plants and animals that reflect Wallingford, past and present. When you buy a tile, your name or a name of your choice will be permanently glazed under the picture.
To find out how you can purchase a tile, stop by the Reference desk for more information, sizes, costs and suggested titles.

Town News and Events

Mayor’s Corner – Wallingford
Dear Friends:
Autumn is upon us with her large and small paintbrushes and pallet of reds, golds, greens, brown and yellow paints. The air has a cool brisk feel as it chases leaves across our lawns. This is the time of year when the wonderful fragrance of warm pie makes us doubly thankful for pumpkins and apples.
Did you ever wonder how the name pie came to describe such a delectable dessert? Apparently in the 1700’s the bird we call the magpie was referred to as the “pie”. As we know, the “pie” of magpie collected all sorts of items to place in its magpie nest. At some time in the long ago past, cooks thought of baking a crust in a dish and filling it with any ingredients that might be at hand such as, fish, meat, chicken, vegetables and other foods. Someone must have described it as pie given the similarity to a “pie’s” nest.
Today, when we enjoy a slice of warm pie with whipped cream or ice cream, we should thank the people from our past because without them, we wouldn’t know what to call such a wonderful treat.
Have a wonderful Fall season,
Bill Dickinson, Mayor of Wallingford

CITY OF MERIDEN EVENTS
THOMAS HOOKER SCHOOL’S “HAUNTED HALLS”
Thomas Hooker School will present the 11th Annual “Haunted Halls” on Saturday, October 28th from 6:00-8:00PM at the school’s 70 Overlook Road address. Tickets are only $2.00 and proceeds will benefit the American Cancer Society. There will be lots of food, frights, and fun for everyone!(Parents are advised that this activity might be too scary for some children).
HALLOWEEN AT CITY HALL
Want to get an early start to candy collection this year? Then come to “Halloween at City Hall”! Departments will be distributing candy to costumed trick-or-treaters ages 12 & under from 3:00-5:00PM on Tuesday, October 31st. Make sure to begin at the Meriden Public Library(105 Miller Street) to get a special bag for candy collection!
TURKEY HUNT
Tom the Turkey is trying something new! To avoid being found, he has chosen five hiding spots this year. Clues to the five locations will be given on the Recreation Activity Line (630-4279) on the following dates: 11/9, 11/13, 11/14, 11/15, & 11/16. Children ages 12 & under are asked to identify the locations on paper and submit them to the Parks & Recreation office (460 Liberty Street) by 4:00PM on Monday, November 20th. Entries can be mailed or delivered in-person and should contain the child’s full name, address, phone, school, and grade level. One winner will be selected by drawing to receive a special Thanksgiving prize package.
FESTIVAL OF SILVER LIGHTS ILLUMINATION CEREMONY
The 2006-2007 Festival of Silver Lights will kick off on Tuesday, November 21st with a special lighting ceremony at Hubbard Park’s pool parking lot at 6:00PM. The event will feature music, entertainment, costumed characters, refreshments, and the opportunity to see this year’s holiday lights illuminated for the very first time.
CASTLE CRAIG
The vehicle access road to Castle Craig is open daily from 10:00AM-4:45PM, weather permitting, through October 31st. The entrance to the road is located under the eastern Interstate 691 overpass in Hubbard Park.
INDOOR PUBLIC SWIM PROGRAM
The 2006-2007 Indoor Public Swim Program is currently underway at the Maloney High School pool. The pool’s weekly schedule will be as follows: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 6:30-7:45PM and Saturdays & Sundays from 12:00-3:45PM.
All interested participants must possess a valid 2006 pool pass. Available for purchase at the Parks & Recreation office, passes cost $5.00 for adults and $1.00 for children ages 17 & under. Potential recipients must come to the office in-person and bring proof of Meriden residency to receive a pass.
CO-ED ADULT VOLLEYBALL PROGRAM
Organized recreational volleyball games for adults ages 18 & older take place every Tuesday night at Holy Angels Center in South Meriden from 6:00-9:00PM. The program will runs through March 27th. A one-time $25.00 registration fee can be paid onsite any night the program is in session. Please note the program will not meet on Tuesday, October 31st.
MERIDEN MEN’S BASKETBALL LEAGUE
Team registrations for the 2006-2007 Meriden Men’s Basketball League will be accepted through Friday, November 3rd at the Parks & Recreation office. The entrance fee is $475.00 per team. Games will begin in late November and run through March. Games are played on weekday nights at Washington Middle School, Lincoln Middle School, and the Meriden YMCA. Teams interested in obtaining a registration packet are asked to call 630-4259.
MERIDEN SKATEPARK
The Meriden Skatepark, located on the corner of Coe Avenue & Hamilton Street, has the following hours of operation(weather permitting):
School Days 2:00PM-Dusk
Non-School Days 11:00AM-Dusk

Wallingford Park and Recreation Events
Hip House Dance Series
Once again the Hip House Dance Series is back for another year of fun and excitement. The parks and
recreation department would like to welcome back all of the retuning 7th and 8th graders while also welcoming the new 6th graders. To ensure that you are able to attend all of the dances, you must purchase a photo ID pass. The dance pass allows you entry to the dance. No passes will be sold in the schools or on the
day of the dance. Photo ID’s will go on sale July 1st for $25.00. As of September 1st, all dance passes will be $35.00. We encourage everyone to take advantage of the discounted price. Participants will not be allowed to enter the dance without a photo ID pass.
The Party Place
Let the recreation department throw your child’s birthday party. We provide the decorations,
paper goods, party planner and fun. $125 per party (up to 10 children ages 4 to 10) $7 each additional child. Includes Party room, gymnastic room, streamers, table covers, balloons, party favor, party hats, ooey gooey craft, stickers, lolli pops a party coordinator to plan, set up, clean up and facilitate the party For more information, please contact the recreation department at 294-2120.
Ski Bums at Mt. Southington
Whether you’re a skier or a boarder, this is five nights of fun on the slopes that you do not want
to miss. Registration for all Ski Bum programs will begin on Wednesday, November 1st and will end November 17th at the recreation department. Each program will be limited to 100 participants. Complete fee schedule is not available as of this printing. Please call the recreation department in October for a complete listing of program options and fees. Any parent that is interested in becoming a chaperone should contact Michelle at the recreation department. Chaperones will have the opportunity to ski/snowboard at no cost. Please note that registration will only be held for two weeks during the dates provided above.
Program breakdown:
4th & 5th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
6th, 7th & 8th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
9th & 10th grades Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
A GOBLIN GATHERING - FRIDAY OCTOBER 27, 2006
6:45P.M.
A gathering for all Wallingford Goblins! Gather in front of the Wallingford Town Hall for an evening of fun activities, d.j.monster mash music and ghoulish games by- Jock In The Box, pre-bagged candy, cider and donuts. Activities to include Halloween henna tattoos, art projects, glow necklaces for
the first 500 children, a pumpkin illumination circle - participants are encouraged to bring a carved pumpkin, candles will be provided by the Parks and Rec. pumpkins may be taken home at the end of the event. This event is sponsored by Wallingford Public Celebrations Committee and Wallingford Parks and Recreation.
9 AND A CHICKEN
This year’s hunt will be one for the ages. Participants will be required to go to the Recreation Department to pick up a packet of CERTIFIED clues. (We want to make sure that all participants start from the Recreation Department so everyone has a fair shot) These clues will lead you to 9 cardboard turkeys and the bonus chicken. All cardboard turkeys and chicken will be hidden on Wallingford town property. The object is to locate a turkey and return it to the Parks and Recreation for the gift certificate. Awards: “Turkey Baskets” from Sweet Nuts Ice Cream. Clues must be handed in at time of redemption.
When: November 17, 2006
Day: Friday Time: 7:00p.m.
Fee: Free
Where: Wallingford Parks and Recreation Department


Mayor’s Corner - Meriden
Dear Friends,
Happy Halloween! As I woke up for my morning jog, I could not help but notice that the first frost of the season had arrived. I know this is our warning that the winter season is on the way. This will be our daughter Bria’s first Halloween and Amy has already selected a bright red lobster outfit for Bria. My hope is that Bria will collect a few candies for me too.
Over the past week, I solicited the support of our federal representatives to help us save the South Broad Street Post Office. While I am excited to see the new Post Office on Center Street moving along, I am concerned about the future of the South Broad Street location. Meriden, with approximately 60,000 residents, deserves no less than two full Postal Facilities. As Mayor for the last five years I have met numerous times with numerous postal representatives. At no time during those meetings was the closure of the South Broad Street facility shared with me, Majority Leader Steve Zerio, or Economic Development Director Peggy Brennan. I thank our citizens for their patience as the new facility is being built and want you to know that we are working together to try to keep the South Broad Street facility open.
Congratulations to the Meriden Police Department on the opening of the new Jeffrey Boucher substation on East Main Street. It is exciting to see the police department expanding into the community once again. I would also like to thank the owner of the building for providing the space rent free for our neighborhood initiative program.
In closing, thank you Chief Trainor and the Meriden Fire Department for sponsoring our 3 on 3 basketball team in the Rotary Tournament at Westfield Shoppingtown. While Councilor Salafia helped lead us to victory against the Rotary Club, we met our match against a few high schoolers. Thank you to the Rotary Club, Westfield Shoppingtown, and all the sponsors for a great day.
Thanks for your support!
Sincerely,
Mark D. Benigni - Mayor

News and Events from Late October 2006 issue of The People's Press

How to make a submission to The People's Press
It's easy to make a submission to The People's Press. Although we cover local events from Central Connecticut in our newspaper, we certainly will accept stories, poems, photos and more from all over the world. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!! You can make a submission by emailing andy@peoplespressnews.com . Mailing to: The People's Press, P.O. Box 4459, Yalesville CT 06492 or going to our website www.peoplespressnews.com and press the submit button. No matter where you are from you may submit a story, poem, photo, recipe and more. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call Andrew P. Reynolds at 203.235.9333. Remember every public-submitted item is FREE!!!!
WALLINGFORD COMMUNITY DINNERS
Come celebrate the holiday with us! Enjoy turkey and all the trimmings – with music, laughter, and a good time for all!
WHEN: THANKSGIVING DAY & CHRISTMAS DAY NOON – 2:00 PMWHERE: FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF WALLINGFORD 23 S. MAIN ST. TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED MEALS WILL BE DELIVERED TO THE HOMEBOUND DON’T SPEND THE HOLIDAY ALONE!! FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299
Sponsored by: Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. and First Congregational Church of Wallingford
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Michael Edward Fanning, 51, Topeka, KS passed away Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2006.
Michael was born February 17, 1955 in Meriden-Wallingford, CT, the son of Edward and Louise Segaline Fanning. He married Tammy Tomlinson on May 10, 1980. Michael graduated from Horris-Wilcox Technical School and worked as an electrician for BNSF railway for 15 years. He was a member of ABATE. He served eight years in Army. He leaves to cherish his memory, his wife, Tammy, son, Paul and his wife, Candace Fanning, daughters, Allison and Ashley Fanning, grandchildren, Neaveh and Brooklyn Fanning, all of Topeka, sisters, Karen Fanning, Clairmont, VT, Maureen Dugette-Fanning, Springfield, VT, and Linda Roukey, Tuscon, AZ. He was preceded in death by his parents and a grandson, Julius James Harvey. A celebration of Michael’s life was held from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., Tuesday, at Kevin Brennan Family Funeral Home, 2801 SW Urish Rd., Topeka, KS. Services in Vermont will be announced at a later date.
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The Senior Buddy Readers Program
Seeks Volunteers
The Senior Buddy Readers intergenerational mentoring & literacy program is currently seeking volunteers for the 2006-2007 school year. Active retirees are needed to help first- and second-grade students improve their reading skills. The program runs from October through the end of May and takes place in six of Meriden’s elementary schools: Ben Franklin, Casimir Pulaski, Hanover, Israel Putnam, Nathan Hale and Thomas Hooker schools. Anyone interested in sharing one hour a week mentoring a child is invited to call the office of Meriden Children First Initiative at 630-3566. Make a difference in the life of a child…become a Senior Buddy Reader volunteer! (The Senior Buddy Readers program is sponsored by nonprofit Meriden Children First Initiative and is supported financially through foundation grants and local business donations.)
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Exhibit Opens At Easel Works
Ghosts - Goblins - Ghouls....And A Pumpkin Or Two
The Exhibit .....Ghosts - Goblins - Ghouls.....And A Pumpkin Or Two, will open on Saturday, September 30th at Easel Works Creative Art Studio & Gallery. The imagination gone wild.... ......Ghosts....Goblins......Ghouls.....Pumpkins....come together in this unusual and unique display of creative art celebrating Halloween done by adult and young artists. The public is invited to stop by during "Art On The Wall." The Exhibit will be on display throughout the month of October.
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Meriden Humane Society has opened a thrift store, also at 311 Murdock Avenue, Meriden. If you have any items you would like to donate, it would be most appreciative to receive them to bring over to the shelter. Thanks in advance for whatever help you can provide. It is a challenge raising over $200,000 yearly to support the stray and abandoned animals we serve at this no-kill shelter, so any help you can give would be wonderful. Thanks again. **
CT VNA Hospice: Volunteer
Do you want to make a difference in your life and the life of someone else?
Have you ever considered becoming a hospice volunteer? Hospice is about living life to its fullest, and we need your help to make this possible for our patients and their families. There are many volunteer opportunities available.... companionship, respite for weary caregivers, visiting patients with your pet, sharing your musical or artistic talents, or helping with clerical projects.
Training to become a volunteer with Connecticut VNA's hospice will be beginning soon. For an enriching and meaningful experience, please call today.
For more information, please call Jolan Szollosi, Volunteer Coordinator at 203-679-5342
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Lyman Hall Plans 25-year reunion
The Lyman Hall High School class of 1981 will sponsor a 25-year reunion from 7:00 p.m. to midnight Nov. 24th at Zandri’s Stillwood Inn on Route 5. The cost is $50 per person and will include open bar, buffet dinner and a disc jockey. For information, call Joe or Debi (Fusco) Mrozowski at (203) 269-3106.
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HOLY ANGELS CHURCH SEEKS CRAFTERS FOR HOLIDAY BAZAAR
Holy Angels Church, 585 Main Street in South Meriden is seeking Vendors and Craftspeople for its annual holiday bazaar “Christmas on the Hill” to be held on Saturday, November 18. The Bazaar will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Holy Angels Parish Center. The bazaar will feature crafts, food, baked goods and raffle prizes. There is a per-table charge. For further information (203) 235-3822.
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Meriden Supporters Wanted to Achieve Universal Healthcare in Connecticut
Do you want quality, affordable healthcare? Do you know someone who is struggling to get the healthcare they deserve? Does your business have trouble affording insurance for your employees? If so, you will be interested in attending Meriden’s Public Forum on “Achieving Universal Healthcare Together.” The healthcare4every1 campaign through Meriden Children First Initiative will be sponsoring this public event. This campaign is committed to organizing a network of diverse Connecticut residents in order to build public and political support to achieve Universal Healthcare in Connecticut. There are more than 356,000 Connecticut residents who have no health insurance coverage and more than 4,500 Meriden residents who are uninsured. This public forum will be one to generate discussion on what would be an ideal health insurance plan and how we can promote this initiative in order to achieve Universal Healthcare throughout the state of Connecticut. Together we can achieve Universal Healthcare in Connecticut. Massachusetts, Maine, and New Hampshire have achieved Universal Healthcare. Let’s be the next! Please make your voice be heard and show your support on Wednesday, October 25th from 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. at John Barry School cafeteria. Day care can be provided at your request. State Representative Senator Christopher Donovan and State Senator Thomas Gaffey will be the keynote speakers as they are avid supporters of this campaign. Juan Figueroa, President of the Universal Health Care Foundation, and Mayor Mark Benigni will be presenting at the forum. Please invite your family, friends and colleagues to show your support. There will be a translator available for Spanish speaking families. Please contact Marissa Cardona at (203) 815-5680 or Dante Bartolomeo at (203) 815-5758 by October 20th to confirm your attendance or for any information on this important initiative. Remember: Healthcare is a right!
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Enter Essay Contest to Win New Playground for Hubbard Park
Please help win a new barrier-free handicapped accessible playground for Hubbard Park! Hasbro is sponsoring an essay contest offering a $300,000 Boundless Playground for one grand prize winner's community, and online gift cards valued at $125 each for 20 finalist prize winners. Submit an original 500- to 750-word essay by November 30th, along with the completed entry form. One entry per family. Go to www.hasbro.com/playskool, click on In the Community/ Boundless Playground for contest rules and to download the entry form. The entry form is also available at www.noahsarkofhope.com .
For more information about the playground project send an email to hubbardParkPlayground@peoplespressnews.com
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CRAFTERS NEEDED FOR CRAFT FAIR
A craft fair is being sponsored by the Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, Meriden/Wallingford Relay for Life Team, and crafters are needed. It will be held on Saturday, November 11th, at the Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, 143 Hope Hill Road in Yalesville. The fair will run from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Anyone interested in having a space, and would like more information and a registration form, please call Diane at 265-5576.
YALESVILLE VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT CRAFT FAIR
Craft fair November 11, 2006, Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, 143 Hope Hill Road, Yalesville. Sponsored by The Yalesville Volunteer Fire Department, American Cancer Society, Relay for Life Team
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HALLOWEEN HAPPENING
When: Friday, October 27, 2006, at 8:00 p.m. and Saturday, October 28, 2006, at 8:00 p.m.
What: The silent film "Nosferatu," 1922, with live organ accompaniment by Shari Lucas. The film is based almost entirely on Bram Strokers "Dracula." Many people not only consider it the best Dracula film ever made, but the best horror film ever made.
Where: The First Church of Christ, 190 Court Street, Middletown, CT. Exit 15 off Route 9, take first left onto Main Street, then first left onto Court Street.
Fee: Suggested donation of $5.00 per person and $10.00 per family
Info: 860-346-6657
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Volunteers Wanted For Meriden Public Schools
The Meriden Public Schools Volunteer Program is currently seeking media help at two elementary schools. This opportunity would consist of helping the library/media teacher check out books with elementary students and other related media tasks. If you would like to help out and have some fun, please call, Nan L Despres, Coordinator of Volunteers at 634-7985. Other volunteer opportunities in the Meriden Public Schools also exist. One half-hour a week is all that is required. Training is provided. We will work around your schedule. All are encouraged to volunteer. Retirees and bilingual are very welcome.
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St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Meriden will hold a Holiday Fair on Saturday, November 4th, 2006, from 9:00 - 3:00. This year’s theme is “Winter Wonderland.” Tables for outside crafters are available. For information/application please call Pat @238-4227, Jen at 238-2283 or the Church at 237-7451. The fair will feature a basket raffle, bake sale, outside crafters, and a Cafe'.
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Pratt and Whitney Cancer Meeting I would like to update you on some information on the Brain Cancer study at Pratt and Whitney. This is a long hard research study that has been going on for some time now. There will be an informational session meeting on Wednesday October 18, 2006, at 7:00 p.m at the Crowne Plaza Hotel and Conference Center in Cromwell, Connecticut. I would like to encourage all people who are employed at P&W, worked or are retired from Pratt & Whitney or anybody who is interested in the study to attend this worthwhile meeting. Get the information firsthand from the scientists and researchers themselves. There will also be a time where you can sit down with the researchers and discuss your concerns and your issues. We are also still in need of employees who can help us describe processes from years ago. This is one of the largest studies in the world that has ever been conducted. We want to make this a most accurate and effective study. The researchers who are entrusted to this project are very highly qualified.
Dr. Gary Marsh, Ph.D -- In charge of epidemiology. He is the principal investigator , from the University of Pittsburgh.
Dr.Nurtan Esmen, Ph.D -- In charge of exposure assessment. He is the principal investigator from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Frank Lieberman, M.D. -- In charge of genetics. He is from the University of Pittsburgh.
All of these researchers have teams put in place to handle the heavy volume of work. This is also a joint initiative between the International Association of Machinists District 26, The Department of Public Health, and Pratt & Whitney.
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Connecticut VNA Announces Grand Opening of “The Art of Hospice Care” at NOMA Gallery in Middletown
Connecticut VNA’s Hospice has planned a grand opening celebration for the debut of their traveling art exhibit entitled, “Continuing the Journey - The Art of Hospice Care.” The public is invited to attend the opening of the exhibit on Friday, October 6, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the NOMA Gallery, 648 Main Street, Middletown. The exhibit is an extraordinary and powerful multimedia display depicting the use of the arts in hospice care. It is a collection of paintings, drawings, photography, poetry, shadow boxes and more that have been done with, for and about ordinary people at the end of their lives. The exhibit highlights the unique gifts patients and their loved ones have received through Connecticut VNA’s compassionate and supportive Hospice team. Susan Rosano, an Expressive Arts Therapist with Connecticut VNA’s Hospice team and an organizer of the exhibit, said the group wanted to show the public the incredible work that is being done with people at the end of their lives and how it can contribute to the process of emotional healing for family members and friends. “The poems we write with our patients -- the collages and drawings we help them make -- their hand castings -- all have become lasting memorials to them.” Marion Donahue, President of Connecticut VNA, said the exhibit will help people understand the major role art and art therapy can play in helping them cope with a terminal illness. “The strength and intensity of the arts and complementary services in end of life care are tangible through this dramatic collection. Our complementary therapies team put a great deal of time and energy into developing this exceptional exhibit and we are very proud of what they’ve accomplished.” “Completing the Journey: The Art of Hospice Care” will be on display at the NOMA Gallery through November 17, and will then be exhibited through various venues around the state. For additional information or to learn how you can showcase this traveling exhibit, please contact Susan Rosano at 203-679-5300.
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Meeting of Parent Support Group in the Naugatuck Valley Region for parents who have out-of-control adolescent and adult children. Tough Love St. Anthony's Church Routes 68 and 69 Prospect, CT Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
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THE MERIDEN SKI CLUB
The Meriden Ski Club was established in 1963 to provide its members with skiing opportunities and skiing values. The club sponsors a wide variety of activities, which include day bus trips to ski areas in Massachusetts, New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire. Weekend and weeklong trips are also sponsored. This year they include weekend trips to Stow, Vermont; Burke Mountain, Vermont; Sugarbush, Vermont; and Sunapee, New Hampshire. This year’s weeklong trips will be to Whistler/Blackcomb, Canada; Banff, Canada; and to Andorra, Spain. Each year’s trips are to different areas. In the past our trips have been to France, Italy, and Austria. The club also has a staff of ASIA trained ski instructors who provide ski and snow board lessons to our members and their children. Club instructors often offer instruction on ski trips that they may attend. For members who are interested in ski racing, the club participates in the Connecticut Ski Council Monday night race program at Mt. Southington. Many members also race in various race programs and in the annual Club Race. We also sponsor race training programs where members can learn to race. We offer various ways to save on skiing costs. The Connecticut Ski Council offers close to 100 ski days when lift tickets, to various ski areas, can be purchased from $20 to $30. The club also purchases discounted bulk tickets that are sold to club members at reduced rates. The Meriden Ski Club offers a wide variety of social events for members, their children and guests to participate in. These events are held throughout the year. These events consist of a semiformal dance, Christmas party, members’ nights and an annual season awards banquet. In the past we have held outings to Block Island, picnics, bike rides, golf tournaments, baseball games and tubing. The club offers a listing of club members along with addresses and phone numbers. This information is furnished for the benefit of members who may want to contact other members to plan skiing or other activities. On October 26, 2006, we will be having an Open House. At our open house we have representatives from different club trips and activities on hand to answer any questions a prospective member may have. Various ski shops and ski areas will also have representatives in attendance. Refreshments will be served and we will have door prizes, which will include ski equipment and area lift tickets. This night will give prospective members a chance to talk to our members, ask questions and find out what the Meriden Ski Club has to offer.
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Crafters Wanted
The Fatima Women's Club of Our Lady of Fatima Church, Yalesville is sponsoring a craft fair on Saturday November 11, 2006, in the parish hall from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and crafters are needed. Please call Sandy P. at 235-2639 or Sandy C. at 269-6498 for more details.
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CRAFTERS WANTED
The North Italian Home Club on 43 Thorpe Avenue in Meriden will be having its annual Holiday Craft Fair on Saturday December 9, 2006, from 9:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Crafters interested in renting space may call MaryAnn at 203-238-4143 for more information.
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EXHIBITIONS AND PROGRAMS: NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2006
The Gallery's main building, designed by American architect Louis Kahn, reopens to the public on December 10. The reopening will feature masterworks from the African, Asian, early European, and modern and contemporary collections, including important new acquisitions. Information about special events for the reopening will be sent out in October. In the meantime, exhibitions, gallery talks, and master classes continue in the Gallery's Swartwout wing; please see link to PDF for complete schedule.
The Gallery's Kahn building reopens to the public on December 10, 2006.The new exhibition "Jasper Johns: From Plate to Print" opens December 10.The new exhibition "Making a Mark: Four Contemporary Artists in Print" opens December 10. The new exhibition "Responding to Kahn: A Sculptural Conversation" opens December 10.
Complete calendar of events (PDF) is available at:
http://artgallery.yale.edu/pages/info/press.html
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Volunteers Needed for the American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk Sunday, October 15
Volunteers are needed for the 12th annual American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk on Sunday, October 15, 2006, at Bushnell Park in Hartford, CT. More than 250 volunteers are needed to help the Society make strides against breast cancer. Opportunities to help include greeting walkers, registration, distributing snacks and drinks, directing traffic and parking, setup and clean up. Individuals and groups are encouraged to become involved. If you have one or more hours to help anytime from 7:00 a.m. through the afternoon, please contact Kathy Maguda at 203.379.4875, via email at Kathy.maguda@cancer.org or in person at the American Cancer Society, 538 Preston Avenue, Meriden. Making Strides is the oldest and largest one-day walk in the nation to fight breast cancer. Funds raised support the American Cancer Society's breast cancer research, education, advocacy and patient support programs. For more information about Making Strides, visit www.cancer.org/stridesonline, call 1.800.ACS.2345.
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“A Night for Noah” Cocktail Party
Friday, November 3, 2006
Triple Crown Room, Colts Neck, New Jersey, 7:00 p.m.
For more information contact Allyson Zenkert at noahsarkofhope@yahoo.com
“A Night for Noah” Dance featuring Riverstreet
Saturday, November 18, 2006, Mountainside Outing Club, 8:00 p.m.
Ticket Info:
Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at the following locations in Meriden:
JC Music
529 West Main Street
Fishers Fine Foods
21 South Colony Street
Katz Sports Shop
519 West Main Street
Valencia Liquors
1231 East Main Street
If you are interested in purchasing tickets or would like to volunteer for this event, please call Kathy Showerda at 203/235-4508 or Nancy Crispino at 203/237-7908.
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Benjamin Franklin Elementary School Fall Family Night
Hayride, pumpkin carving, snacks, and late night at the book fair on October 26th from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
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Are you ready for some fun? Kiwanis Kapers is coming November 3 & 4th!
Kiwanis Kapers presents “Those Were The Days.” Celebrating Meriden's Bicentennial and 55 years of Kapers. Join us for this highly entertaining variety show reflecting back on some of the more memorable moments of our past. This year’s show brings back some of our alumni performers and is filled with humor and a variety of acts sure to please first-timers as well as seasoned Kaper-goers. George says he's been warming up his vocals all summer long! Where? Maloney High School. When? November 3 & 4. Time? 8:00 PM. All proceeds directly support Kiwanis sponsored community activities .
Tickets call Dave at 537-6175.
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Old Saybrook Fire Department is pleased to announce the 9th Annual Haunted Hayride, 2006. All year long we put out the fires, but during Halloween, we ignite a blaze of scary for all to enjoy.
A possessed tractor-drawn hay wagon leads you into the deep, dark, demented woods of Middlesex County. For more than 50 minutes you will venture into the ghastly world of ghosts, goblins, and ghouls. In the fog, you'll be frightened by the eerie sounds of nature versus creature. Which are in front, which are behind, and witch are beyond?
Where: CLARK MEMORIAL FIELD, 210 ELM STREET & INGHAM HILL ROAD (Across from Pasta Vita), OLD SAYBROOK, CT.
When: FRIDAY OCT. 27th, SATURDAY, OCT. 28th, & SUNDAY OCT. 29th.
TRAILER RIDES START AT DUSK 7:00 p.m.
$10.00* ADULTS, CHILDREN UNDER 12 - $5.00*
*Bring a can of food to donate for the Shoreline Soup Kitchen & receive $1.00 off admission
*ADVANCE GROUP SALES OR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, VISIT: www.oldsaybrookfire.com (http://www.oldsaybrookfire.com/hayride.html) /hayride.html
*Groups of 20 or more, includes express admission.
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INTERFAITH VOLUNTEER CARE GIVERS WALLINGFORD WANTED!
Volunteers to help frail, elderly neighbors shop, get to medical appointments, provide respite to a family member.
QUALIFICATIONS: People with a warm, loving heart and one or two hours of time each week. No hands-on care!
BENEFITS: Feel great about yourself! Have fun! Plan you own hours! Meet new people!
Become an Interfaith Volunteer Care Giver! Find out more by calling Marie Cunha, Social Worker, Wallingford Senior Center at 265-7753.
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Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield
New Medicare Advantage HMO Plan
Information Session
Wallingford Senior Center, Friday, October 27, 2006, 10:15 a.m.
Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield have rolled out a new HMO Plan. Medicare beneficiaries can receive their Medicare benefits through a Medicare Advantage plan. Learn about premium costs, co-payments and extra benefits of Anthem's new HMO plan. Then you can compare costs and benefits of this new HMO plan with traditional Medicare Part A&B coverage and a Medigap insurance policy. Please call 265-7753 to sign up; open to the public.
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MEDICARE PART D OPEN ENROLLMENT INFORMATION SESSION
Wallingford Senior Center, Thursday, October 26, 2006, 10:15 a.m.
The next opportunity to enroll in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan is November 15 through December 31, 2006. Even if you are already enrolled in a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan please come learn about:
a. Medicare drug plan coverage for 2007b. How to switch from one drug plan to anotherc. Who gets "Extra Help"d. How does the "Coverage Gap" worke. How to delay or avoid reaching the "Coverage Gap"
Please register for this program by calling 265-7753; open to the public.
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COURSE FOCUSES ON FALL MIGRATION OF BIRDS
By popular demand, Guilford-based Sunrise Birding is offering another Fall Migration Bird Watching Course in October and November. Taught by instructor Gina Nichol, this course offers beginner and experienced bird watchers the chance to practice bird watching, gain experience, and improve bird identification skills with fall migrants, including shorebirds, raptors, sparrows, and more. Participants will learn how to use field marks, habitat, behavior, and sound as aids in identification. Through field observation, bird watchers will learn how to identify birds with confidence and gain knowledge of where and when to look for birds. The series of three outdoor sessions is offered on Tuesday mornings beginning October 31st and continuing on November 7th & 14th, 2006, from 8:00 – 10:00 a.m. at Lighthouse Point Park in New Haven. Lighthouse Point Park is a hotspot for bird migration through November. Many migrant birds including cave swallow, brant, long-tailed duck, red-breasted merganser, common loon and other waterfowl pass through the park on their southward journey. Other species possible can include rough-legged hawk, great-horned owl, and shorebirds, including yellowlegs and dunlin. The fee for the course is $69 per person. Discounts are available to supporters of local conservation organizations. Advance registration is required. For more information and to register, go to http://www.sunrisebirding.com/fall_migration_courseII.htm.
Sunrise Birding offers personalized, authentic, affordable travel adventures and learning opportunities intended to reveal the splendor and diversity of the natural world.
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You can HELP!!!
Australia's island state of Tasmania is home to unique ecosystems that contain some of the Earth's most incredible plants and animals. Yet one lumber company, Gunns Limited, is rapidly destroying its 400-year-old trees, polluting its streams, and killing off its wildlife, including protected or threatened species. Tell Gunns Ltd. to stop its destruction of Tasmanian forests and wildlife! Despite global protests, Gunns Ltd. is clear-cutting the world's tallest hardwood trees and ancient old-growth forests in the most despicable ways imaginable. This company is responsible for:
Clear-cutting roughly 44 football fields of pristine forests every day Destroying 400-year-old trees Firebombing the clear-cut land with napalm, incinerating wildlife habitat Poisoning hundreds of thousands of the surviving wildlife with 1080, a toxin banned in many countries
No corporation has the right to destroy our natural resources in this way! Please join the fight to save this precious ecosystem by taking action at: http://go.care2.com/e/M_Q/rq/CFtJ In the words of singer Olivia Newton-John, “Where once awesome trees formed pillars of a dense and vibrant forest ecosystem, what remains are barren landscapes reminiscent of a devastated battlefield. And there’s much more to come if we don’t put a stop to it.” ”What Tasmania has now is a natural wonder. And what we’ve already lost to unmitigated corporate greed cannot be replaced in our lifetime ... or our children’s. Please, help put an end to Gunns’ profit-driven destruction of our natural wonders, our natural legacy.”
Publisher's Note: It is one of our missions to help save our world and all species from extermination. If you know any local, national or global issues that we can help with - please let us know.
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RESIDENTIAL ELECTRONICS RECYCLING EVENT November 4, 2006, 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at North Haven High School , 221 Elm Street, North Haven
ITEMS ACCEPTED: computers, monitors, phones, TVs, VCRs, copiers, fax machines, printers, radios, stereos, camcorders, microwave ovens.
ITEMS NOT ACCEPTED: electronics containing mercury, refrigerants or radioactive substances.
Available to residents of Cheshire, Hamden, Meriden, North Haven and Wallingford.
NO COMMERCIAL ELECTRONICS ACCEPTED
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL: Wallingford Project Coordinator at 294-2061.
Directions
From I-91 New Haven area: I-91 NORTH - Exit 9 (Montowese Avenue). Turn left at the end of the exit ramp. Follow and bear right on to Universal Drive. Continue through four traffic lights. At the fifth light, turn right on to Sackett Point Road. At the first light turn left on to Elm Street. North Haven High School is on the right-hand side.
From I-91 Meriden area: I-91 SOUTH -Exit 12 (Washington Avenue). Turn left at the end of the exit ramp on to Washington Avenue. Follow Washington Avenue through the center of North Haven. Turn right on to Broadway. Follow to the next traffic light. Turn left on to Elm Street. Follow Elm Street through one traffic light. North Haven High School is on the left.
From Wilbur Cross Pkwy New Haven area: ROUTE 15 - Exit 63 (Bishop Street). Turn right at the end of the exit ramp on to Bishop Street. Follow straight through the first traffic light. At the second traffic light turn right on to Washington Avenue. Continue on Washington Avenue until you come to the Town Green on the left. Turn right on to Broadway. Follow to the next traffic light. Turn left on to Elm Street. Follow Elm Street through one traffic light. North Haven High School is on the left.
From Wilbur Cross Pkwy Meriden area: ROUTE 15 - Exit 63 (Bishop Street). Turn left on to Hartford Turnpike. At the traffic light, turn left on to Bishop Street. Follow straight through first traffic light. At the second traffic light turn right on to Washington Avenue. Continue on Washington Avenue until you come to the Town Green on the left. Turn right on to Broadway. Follow to the next traffic light. Turn left on to Elm Street. Follow Elm Street through one traffic light. North Haven High School is on the left.
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MOHEGAN SUN CASINO
The Ulbrich Boys & Girls Club will be hosting a bus trip to Mohegan Sun Casino, on Saturday, November 4, 2006. The bus will leave the commuter’s parking lot next to Vinny’s Garden Center on RT 5 in Wallingford at 5:00 p.m. and will leave the Casino at 12:30 a.m. The cost of tickets is $40/pp. Each ticket includes bus ride to Casino, two $10 bets, and one $10 buffet coupon. You can purchase tickets at the Ulbrich Boys & Girls Club, 72 Grand Street, Wallingford, CT. Call for information at 203-269-7525.
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GALLERY 5353 Colony Street, Meriden. (203) 235-5347
Tues. – Fri., 12:00 – 4:00 p.m., Sat 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Oct. 7 – Nov. 3, 2006
82nd ANNUAL OPEN JURIED EXHIBITION
PUBLIC INVITED. ADMISSION FREE. FREE PARKING
The exhibition features approximately 100 artworks, including oils, watercolors, pastels, sculpture, photography, graphics and crafts. Prizes totaling more than $2,000 will be awarded.
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Emotions Anonymous meeting 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. every Thursday at the Mallard Mill Activities room in Elim Park; 140 Cook Hill Road; Cheshire, CT. The program uses the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Alcoholic Anonymous adapted for working on emotional issues. Contact persons: David 203-271-2268 or Michael 203-729-2880.
Emotions Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experiences, feelings, strengths, weaknesses and hopes with one another in order to solve their emotional problems and discover a way to live at peace with unsolved problems. The program uses the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous adapted for working on emotional issues.
The symptoms which lead us to participate in this program are diverse and include depression, anxiety, relationship or work problems, inability to cope with reality and psychosomatic ailments. EA is an anonymous, spiritual program with no affiliation with any specific religious program. People of many different religions as well as those with no religious affiliation are members of EA. There is no fee charged at our meetings; donations are accepted to cover meeting costs and to support the parent organization, Emotions Anonymous International. Our meetings are not run by doctors, therapists, social workers or other professionals; although, it is not rare for people in these professions to attend Emotions Anonymous meetings for their personal recovery like everyone else.
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The Southington Genealogical Society
Next meeting will be Tuesday, October 24th at 7:30 p.m. in the Old Milldale Firehouse. Swedish Genealogy will be the topic. Beth Bunko will present the program. Find out what you'll need to know about patronymic naming in order to trace your family's origins. Learn about parish, emigration, and military records that will help you in your search as well as some of the mailing lists that are full of helpful Swedish researchers. Discover what resources are available in the form of free and paid sites on the Internet, and familiarize yourself with the wealth of information you can find locally at such places as the Family History Center and the Connecticut State Library.
As always, no strings are attached, no reservations are required, and the meeting is free of charge. Mrs. Bunko has been doing genealogy for about nine years. Beth's life-long curiosity about family history turned serious when her daughter had to prepare a family tree for a third-grade class. A specialist in Swedish and French-Canadian genealogy, Mrs. Bunko has also studied the family trees of some of the Mayflower Descendants and the Descendants of the Founders of Hartford. This work enabled her to become familiar with several sources for researching English, Irish, Scottish, and Welsh land holders.
Beth grew up in Southington and lives in town with her husband and two children. The Southington Genealogical Society is a non-profit organization located in central Connecticut that promotes the accurate recording, research, and preservation of family history. The society regularly meets at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of every month, except December, at the Old Milldale Firehouse, 91 Norton Street, Plantsville, Connecticut.
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Dear Business Owner:
As President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the North Italian Home Club of Meriden, I ask you to consider becoming a part of a memory. Our auxiliary is currently designing a game board devoted to celebrating our fine city and its 200-year history. The game is called SilverCityOpoly, and we are honored to be granted the right to make this game our City’s Bicentennial Edition.
You are invited to claim your spot, your square, your place on the 2006 Bicentennial SilverCityOpoly game board. There are numerous levels of participation. All property sales on the board will be sold strictly on a first-come, first-served basis. There is a list of the varied levels of sponsorship attached. All proceeds from the game sales will go to a building fund, which the Ladies have established in hopes of making improvement to our club’s grounds located on Thorpe Avenue, right here in Meriden.
Be one of the lucky folks who recognize what an incredible opportunity this is. For just a few cents per game board, you are placing a permanent advertisement to commemorate your business, your family name, the memory of a loved one or whatever you choose onto the board. That permanent part of our game board will be talked about, laughed about, played with and distributed to hundreds and hundreds of homes both within our city limits and beyond. Folks are bound to want to send our bicentennial edition to former city residents across the globe! With it will go your little piece of history?
Please place your order today. Time is of the essence. Be part of a very unique game board and be seen and heard from for years to come. Get in the game today by calling Sandy at 203-530-0236.
May you, your family and friends continue to thrive in Meriden as we all work to make our city a great place to live, work and play in. I thank you for your time.
Sincerely,
Cynthia D’Agostino, President, Ladies Auxiliary
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Platt High School Sports Card & Coin Show
Dates:November 4, 2006December 2, 2006January 6, 2007February 3, 2007March 3, 2007April 7, 2007May 5, 2007June 2, 2007
Table info 203-634-0069 Ernie203-235-7962 x 139 Athletic office
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PLTI: A Building Block to A Better MeridenBy: Kristen Myers
It was a freezing cold January morning in 2005 when I ventured over to the Head Start building on Liberty Street in Meriden. Being a newer resident of the city, I wasn’t sure where I was headed, so through the fog of my windows I thoroughly read over the directions again and again. I think it was maybe my nerves driving me to re-read the directions, or maybe the excitement of meeting new people. I was headed to my orientation for the Parent Leadership Training Institute. I was going to begin a 20-week course on parent leadership. PLTI of Meriden is an ever-growing group of empowered parents and caregivers who together have decided to commit to becoming stronger leaders and better advocates for their children and their communities. You can only imagine why I would be nervous. One of the most unbelievable things to me about PLTI was the description and commitment it gave to me. “PLTI is a 20-week course designed to assist in giving people some of the tools necessary to be stronger advocates for their children and their community.” They provide a 10-week session in which they teach about the structure of PLTI and the tools we each already bring with us. The second 10 weeks is a semi-crash course in civics (my favorite), in which we were taught how our state government, city and school systems work. We visited council chambers. We had city and state officials like Mayor Bengini, Chris Donovon, and PLTI grad Cathy Abercrombie come and discuss their roles, as well as some “issues” with us. We were given much helpful information to guide us through any problems we may face with our children. The thing that I found most fascinating about this entire program was the desire for the individuals to succeed. In addition to a both educating and enriching human experience, you are given free catered dinner on the evening of your class, free child-care during class time, and assistance with transportation. This is a community project in Meriden that is geared toward creating stronger advocates for Meriden. This is community program that is set up to get us in the fight to get Meriden where it should be. More importantly, this community project gives us, the citizens; the tools reclaim the things we think we might have lost, and the plans to build something new for our community. As I walked in and sat down at orientation, I found myself comforted by the people who surrounded me. Most seemed quiet and a bit nervous; some were still coming in dragging children behind them. There were small candy bowls filled to the brim scattered across the tables. Two women began the class and introduced themselves. Katherine was small and soft-spoken. Her eyes were kind, and she sat still much of the time. Shirley was a force, loud at times, and yet her softness was always present. Shirley seemed almost placed there as a way to show us the differences we may see among ourselves. And it didn’t take long before we did. The class progressed and what happened that day was something that was surprising and necessary. Voices came together and the city was represented and differences were heard, and we HAD TO hold hands and LOOK into each other’s eyes, and I just left there thinking…wow. If every parent with a student in school had to take this course, things in this city would change. I wish I could sugarcoat this for you and say that the 20 weeks was a cakewalk for me. It wasn’t. I was settling into the latter part of my third trimester by the time it was over, and nearly missed my graduation. I can remember quite a few of us leaving some the civics nights frustrated and loving every minute of it later. This is after all our government, right? “By the people, for the people, of the people.” Therefore, if we don’t like something…make a change. You can only imagine the heated discussion and impassioned debate. The different races and nationalities in a room all bring their own piece of the pie. Some nights it was Thanksgiving, some nights Animal House. By and by, worth every Monday evening just to learn what I did. Over the course of 20 weeks I met and knew some truly amazing people. I still get to call many of them friends. I still care about what is happening, and, better yet, I still know I CAN do something that can make a change. The small list of things we can do as parents in our community is too long for me to list. The one thing I will suggest, if you can, find your way to this program and get the tools so many of us did. You will not regret the 20 weeks of time well spent, people well met, or food well eaten. It’s a building block to a better community that only you can bring.
Please contact David Radcliffe or Noami Gonzalez at Meriden’s Children First Initiative for more information. Applications are currently being accepted for the 2007 PLTI class and will be continued to be accepted until October 31, 2006. You can contact Noami or David by calling 203-630-3566 or by picking up an application in person at CFI, located inside the Meriden Public Library, Miller Street.

Halloween Dance, Saturday, October 28, 2006 Dear Good Folks that come to the dances, Well, it's that time of year again for our fundraising Halloween dance. We are staying at the North Italian Home Club for the LAST dances. North Italian Home Club, 43 Thorpe Avenue, Meriden, CT. I’m always a little late getting these notices out to you, for you to get a jump on ticket sales and setting up reservations. BBBBButtttt, I'm earlier or on schedule with last year! I hope there’s still time enough to get your MONSTER, Bill Clinton, George Bush, Saddam with a spear in his heart or SUPERMAN outfits (OPTIONAL) ready for the 28th. Any questions, call me. Home 237-7132, Work 238-8979, leave voice mail or email rpcouture@mmm.com or call Brian McDonald at 235-0671. Sincerely, Rich Couture North Italian Home Club (203) 235-2421
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Colonial Tymes Christmas Fair Saturday, November 4, 2006 Relax for the holidays. Center Congregational Church, Meriden has been working hard to make life easier for you this holiday season. Come and shop for your decorations, gifts, and baked goods. We have created beautiful handmade crafts to decorate your home. We have been sewing, gluing, twisting, stuffing, and painting all summer to fill the tables of our next fair, coming soon. We will have homemade baked goods, and there will be apple pies baking all day, just for you. Have a sample, or take home a whole pie for your freezer, to heat and serve on your special holiday. Your company will think you worked in the kitchen all day. You will find handmade items, including Christmas ornaments, house decorations, and special gifts as you wander around to the different booths. Join us for a mid-morning snack of coffee and our famous sticky buns, or relax and enjoy a cup of our homemade soup with a sandwich for lunch. Then take the “Cookie Walk” where you can gather up your favorite cookies to fill your freezer and make the holidays deliciously easy. We will have pecans fresh from Georgia and cheese direct from Vermont. It doesn't get any fresher than this. With giant specialty theme baskets, a tea cup auction, craft tables, and a tag sale which includes baby clothes, we have something for everyone. There will also be unique activities to occupy the children, and our book sale is always an event. Proceeds from the Fair will be used to help maintain our historic church building, contribute to activities for our youth, and to further local and worldwide ministries. Come join us for this fun day. Center Congregational Church is located at the corner of Broad and East Main Streets, Meriden. Park in the back and come in the side door. The Fair will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on November 4, 2006.
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Giuffrida Park – Meriden, 800 Westfield Road
Giuffrida Park was originally part of an area farmed in the late 1600s and early 1700s by Jonathan Gilbert and later Captain Andrew Belcher. This farm, the first white settlement in this region, became know as the “Meriden Farm,” and from which the whole area eventually took its name.
Mount Lamentation was named in 1636 when a member of Wethersfield Colony became lost and was found by a search party three days later on this ridge, twelve miles from home. There is some controversy whether the Lamentation refers to his behavior or that of those looking for him.
In 1735 a group of local men leased land on the western edge of this mountain in an attempt to find gold, as quartz formations there seemed promising. None was ever found. The reservoir was built by the Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company for its use in the late 1800s. The dam was raised three feet in 1927. Eventually International Silver acquired the property, because it guaranteed the company a reliable source of water, which it used in great quantities in its manufacturing processes. After International Silver built its new factory on South Broad Street, it no longer needed the reservoir. As there was a shortage of water at the time, International Silver gave the city special permission to pipe into their now-unused reservoir.
The property was offered for sale, and the Connecticut Light and Power Co. (CL&P) purchased it in order to provide itself with the land to cross high voltage lines into the Westfield section of Middletown and beyond. CL&P then sold the rest of the land to the city, which bought it under the open spaces program.
The reservoir remains a backup water source today.
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Wallingford Rotary Club
The Wallingford Rotary Club meets Wednesdays, 12:10 p.m. at Brothers Restaurant, 33 North Cherry Street. We welcome guests to come, share lunch and enjoy our weekly speaker program. The cost is $12 per person. Rotarians are dedicated to “Service above Self” in our community, La Romana in the Dominican Republic, in the worldwide battle of Polio Plus, and the family of all. Come discover how Rotarians make a difference, every day. At our October 18th meeting we are privileged to have Mayor William Dickinson of Wallingford as our speaker.
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Students at Wilcox Technical High School To Conduct Advanced Bioscience ExperimentsStudents in Leslie Czerwinski's class at the H. C. Wilcox Technical High School in Meriden will conduct advanced bioscience experiments in their own classroom for two weeks in October, using equipment and materials supplied by Connecticut's BioConnection Program. Under the BioConnection Program, which is free of charge, schools are lent laboratory equipment, and teachers are trained to conduct in their own classrooms experiments from the curriculum of Connecticut's BioBus, the highly successful mobile laboratory program. The Wilcox students will be participating in “The Mystery of the Crooked Cell,” an experiment that explores the genetic basis of disease by identifying samples with sickle cell anemia, and “Cold Stone Caper,” which uses DNA fingerprinting to solve a fictitious crime. “I enjoy leading these experiments,” Ms. Czerwinski said. “They introduce laboratory research tools and techniques beyond the scope of most classrooms.” In order to participate in the BioConnection Program, teachers must attend a one-day training workshop for which they receive CEUs (Continuing Education Units), required of Connecticut teachers to maintain their certification. Over a period of up to two weeks, teachers use the BioConnection unit lent them to teach their students the lessons chosen from the BioBus curriculum. The unit is then replenished and lent to another school. The BioBus curriculum includes several experiments aimed at students in grades 4 through 12 as well as an adult experiment aimed at a general audience. The BioBus and BioConnection Programs were inaugurated by CURE, the state bioscience organization, and rely primarily on CURE members and other Connecticut businesses and organizations for funding. Since its inception, the Programs have trained more than 500 teachers through professional development workshops and reached more than 23,000 students at over 230 schools. Connecticut's bioscience industry currently employs more than 17,000 persons and is expected to grow.

Halloween Dance Saturday October 28, 2006 Dear Good Folks that come to the dances. Well, it's that time of year again for our fundraising Halloween dance. We are staying at the North Italian Home Club for the LAST dances. North Italian Home Club, 43 Thorpe Avenue Meriden 203-235-2421
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News From Your Village Community Lifeline
South Meriden Volunteer Fire Department is the village community lifeline and is celebrating 98 years of service. The department was established back in 1908. It is the only volunteer fire station today in the City of Meriden. It is manned completely by Volunteer professionals. We presently have 28 active members ranging from 18 years old to 60. Our firefighters are certified by the State of Connecticut Fire Academies. Their certification levels depend on the amount of time that each member has spent schooling themselves in the Fire Service. We continue to push our members to continue their education in the fire service and EMS. The more they learn, the more they can improve their chance to advance in life’s everyday adventures. Our active firefighters must achieve the level of Firefighter I, which is approximately 140 hours within their first 12 months in our department. They also must achieve the level of Medical Response Technician (MRT) or Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) within their first 18 months. The certification process then continues. There is Firefighter II, which is approximately 160 hours, Fire Instructor I, approximately 100 hours, Fire Officer I, approximately 100 hours, and this list can and sometimes does continue further. Our members and their families are dedicated to serving not only South Meriden but also the whole City of Meriden when there are citywide emergencies. We are one of the only fully volunteer fire stations in the state that has overnight duty crews. We have personnel that presently man our fire station six nights a week. This has been going on for over five years now. This allows us to respond quicker to emergencies in our area. We believe in providing good customer service to our customers, you, our neighbors. South Meriden Volunteer Fire Department works hand in hand with the Meriden Career Fire Department. Meriden Fire Department has five career stations based throughout the City. The two main stations that also cover the South Meriden area are Station 1, which houses Engine 1 located on Chamberlain Highway, and Station 2, which houses Engine 2 and Truck Company 1 (The Ladder Truck). We usually get dispatched at the same time for calls in the South Meriden area. The incident can be handled by both of the departments or separately. When our station is manned either day or night, depending on the severity of the incident, we usually handle the incident ourselves. This frees the Meriden Engine Company up to handle other emergency incidents that might occur. I believe that Meriden has the best career firefighters in the State. We work with them every day, and I think we all learn from each other each day. Our call volume has been increasing each year. Our station will be doing over 700 calls this year. We are funded with approximately $69,000 a year from the City of Meriden. We also run our own fundraiser each year to help us buy extra equipment and supplies that we cannot afford to purchase with the City funds. In the past several years we have been able to purchase Automatic External Defibrillators (AED) Units. AEDs, as they are known, are used during cardiac emergencies. Our Chief Officers also carry AED Units along with other emergency equipment in their cars so we can also service our neighbors quicker in medical emergency incidents. We also purchased Hazardous Material Multi Gas Reading Meters for our fire apparatus. With your generous donations these meters allow us to identify hazardous gas in the atmosphere while responding to Haz-Mat Incidents. This year we are looking to purchase an all-terrain vehicle equipped for patient care and care for the new liner trails being built in South Meriden, this vehicle will be used to access individuals who might get ill or injured while using the trails. We not only recruit from within Meriden for Volunteers firefighters, but we also do recruitment for certified firefighters who live outside of Meriden as long as they can meet our bylaw requirements to do minimum one-duty overnight crew a week plus meet our drill, meeting and squad duty requirements. Certified Firefighters can apply on Monday evenings at our fire station, which is located at 31 Camp Street, South Meriden. Well, that is all this month. I will visit with you again hopefully next month, God willing.
Stay safe, Keith Gordon Deputy-Chief of Operations
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Quinnipiac Chamber Calls for Nominations! The Quinnipiac Chamber of Commerce seeks nominations for its 7th Annual ATHENA Award luncheon slated for November 3, 2006 at Fantasia, 404 Washington Avenue, North Haven. Governor M. Jodi Rell is this year's Honorary Chair. This prestigious award honors a person who has demonstrated the highest level of professional excellence in his/her business or profession; devoted time and energy to improving the quality of life in the community; and assisted women in attaining their full leadership and personal potential. Past recipients include: Marjorie Dorr, Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield; Dorsey Kendrick, Gateway Community College; Lesley Mills, Griswold Special Care; Simone Mason, A Different Perspective; Anita Silvestro, Girl Scouts, CT Trails Council, Inc.; and Maureen Campbell, H. Pearce Real Estate Co., Inc. Any individual can nominate someone. For a nomination form, please call 269-9891 or 234-0332 or download one from the chamber's website at www.quinncham.com. Submit completed nomination papers to: Quinnipiac Chamber of Commerce, 100 South Turnpike Road, Wallingford, CT 06492. The deadline for nominations is October 13, 2006. Register for the event online at www.quinncham.com or by calling 269-9891 or 234-0332 The Quinnipiac Chamber gratefully acknowledges event presenter Robert's Chrysler Dodge, Inc; corporate sponsor New Alliance Bank, and sponsor ConnectiCare. Media Support includes Business New Haven and Comcast Spotlight. The Quinnipiac Chamber of Commerce, winner of the NAMD Award of Excellence, represents more than 850 businesses and 26,000 employees in the Wallingford & North Haven area.
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Paradise Found at the Central Park Zoo! New Birds of Paradise are a Welcome Addition to the Zoo’s Rain Forest New York, NY, October 4, 2006. The island of Manhattan meets the islands of Indonesia now that the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo is home to four red birds of paradise. These beautiful and exotic creatures are native to Southeast Asia, but hail from the Bronx Zoo, a Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) park. The new additions come in pairs, two males and two females. Similar to many bird species, the males are more ornate, but take seven years to mature into their adult plumage. When fully mature, the males boast long waxy tail wires, red flank plumes, golden shoulders and neck, and a metallic green throat and spectacles. The male red bird of paradise is known for exhibiting a very complex courtship display. When he is attempting to gain the attention of a female, he performs a butterfly dance, which involves spreading and vibrating his wings like a giant butterfly. Curator of Central Park Zoo, Jeff Sailer, studied birds of paradise in their native islands in Indonesia and is especially happy to bring them here. “Birds of paradise are incredibly dynamic and personable birds,” he says. “The Central Park Zoo’s Rain Forest exhibit is a great place to highlight this specie’s natural behavior and allow the general public an opportunity to see them in as natural a setting as possible.” Check out the Central Park Zoo this fall and visit the beautiful new birds. They are already quite at home in the Zoo's Rain Forest and the males are performing their elaborate courtship rituals. This bodes well for the Central Park Zoo animal staff as they hope that one day, the birds will successfully breed. The Central Park Zoo, a Wildlife Conservation Society park, is located at 64th Street and Fifth Avenue. Admission is $8 for adults, $4 for senior citizens, $3 for children 3 to 12, and free for children under 3. Admission includes entry into the main zoo, and the Tisch Children’s Zoo. Summer hours are 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays, and to 5:30 p.m. on weekends and holidays. Tickets are sold until one half-hour before closing. For further information, please call 212-439-6500 or visit www.centralparkzoo.com The Wildlife Conservation Society saves wildlife and wild lands. We do so through careful science, international conservation, education, and the management of the world’s largest system of urban wildlife parks, led by the flagship Bronx Zoo. Together, these activities change individual attitudes toward nature and help people imagine wildlife and humans living in sustainable interaction on both a local and a global scale. WCS is committed to this work because we believe it essential to the integrity of life on Earth. To learn more about WCS, visit www.wcs.org

Volunteers Wanted
The Meriden Public Schools Volunteer Program is currently seeking media help at two elementary schools. This opportunity would consist of helping the library/media teacher check out books with elementary students and other related media tasks. If you would like to help out and have some fun, please call, Nan L Despres, Coordinator of Volunteers at 634-7985. Other volunteer opportunities in the Meriden Public Schools also exist. One half-hour a week is all that is required. Training is provided. We will work around your schedule. All are encouraged to volunteer. Retirees and Bilingual are very welcome.
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Quilt Show and Bake Sale
The Northford Congregational Church is holding a Quilt Show and Bake Sale, November 18th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. View over 30 handmade quilts on loan from area quilters and quilt owners. Many antique and modern quilts will be on exhibit. The quality and craftsmanship are a must see! Tickets are $5. After the exhibit, enjoy a complimentary dessert, coffee/tea in the social hall while you peruse the homemade desserts from the Bake Sale table and stock up for Thanksgiving! There will also be Quilting materials from Quadrille Quilting, LLC, on sale in the social hall. Raffle tickets for our homemade quilt, weekend in Vermont and other prizes can also be purchased. For Quilt Show tickets, you can call the church office at 484-0795 or you can purchase them at the door.
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Fun Events at the Wallingford Family YMCA
Friday Night Family Fit Club Come join us on the following Friday Nights to enjoy a family fitness activity. Each activity will also include a healthy snack. This is a great time for children and parents to stay fit together while having fun! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Parent's Night Out - Night on the Town This program is designed especially for children in grades K - 6. The program will take place every other Friday night from 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Kids will enjoy pizza and juice, games in the gymnasium, and swimming in the pool, while you spend some quality time together, without the kids! See the most recent brochure for current schedules and fees. Ghouls & Goblins of all ages, join us for a fun-filled Halloween afternoon adventure! Arrive in costume for a trick-or-treat parade, costume contest, creepy crafts, ghoulish games, a healthy snack and ghostly storytelling. **
Halloween at the YMCA: Halloween Overnight - A Night of Howling Fun Saturday, October 28 Members: $45 Program Members: $53 Youth and Teens- Join us for a ghoulishly fun Halloween overnight adventure! The fun begins at 7:00 pm on Saturday evening and doesn't stop until 9:00 am on Sunday morning. Arrive in costume and enjoy a ghostly scavenger hunt, creatively cool costume show, splashingly fun swim adventure (bring your swimsuit) and fall asleep listening to ghastly ghostly storytelling. Take a journey through our spook house, if you DARE! Breakfast will be provided. **
Child Care Fun Fair - Saturday, November 18th, 11:30 - 1:30 p.m. Come one, come all to our Child Care Fun Fair! There will be a variety of activities for your family including our fintastic fishing game, pin the feather on the turkey, and our famous YMCA turkey trot. Register at the Welcome Center between October 1st and November 1st. Upon registration, your family's name will be put in our raffle for our YMCA Child Care "Basket of Fun". **
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Saturday, December 9th, 2:00 p.m.Limit 40. Place: Paul Melon Arts Center, Choate Rosemary Hall Appropriate for grades 1 - 7 This musical is based on C.S. Lewis' story about four children who enter the land of Narnia by mistake. Scuba Santa is Coming to Town Sunday, December 10th, 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Come enjoy a holiday craft and listen to the story “A Night Before Christmas.” Then go into our pool and help Scuba Santa decorate an underwater Christmas Tree

News from Children First Initiative
Central Connecticut Civic Youth Orchestra Thursday, October 26th at the Augusta Curtis Cultural Center, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. First rehearsal! Find out more at meridenarststrust@yahoo.com.
Health Care for Everyone! Wednesday, October 25, 6:30 p.m. at John Barry Elementary There will be a "Health Care For All" Public Forum to discuss Connecticut's Health Care Crisis on October 25th. The forum is hosted by Meriden Children First Initiative and the Healthcare4every1 Campaign. Guest speakers include State Representative Christopher Donovan, State Senator Thomas Gaffey, Juan Figueroa - President of the Universal Health Care Foundation of CT, and Mayor Mark Benigni. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions of the speakers, get educated on the issue, and participate in influencing future legislation. RSVPs and questions may be directed to Danté Bartolomeo at 203-518-5758 or dbartolomeo1@cox.net or Marissa Cardona at 815-5680. Childcare available on request. Spanish translation also available.
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Candidate Forum Monday, October 30, 6:00 p.m. at Lincoln Middle School. Where do candidates for the Connecticut General Assembly stand on issues important to you? Housing? Taxes? Safety? Redevelopment? Education? How will they represent your interests in Hartford? Candidates from the 13th Senate, 82nd House, 83rd House, and 84th House will be there. If you have a question you'd like posed to the candidates, send it to President@meridenchamber.com Forum is cosponsored by Meriden Children First, Meriden Federation of Teachers, Record-Journal, Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce, and Meriden Wallingford NAACP.
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Stone Soup Early Learning Conference Tuesday, October 24, 9-3 p.m., Farmington Marriott, Farmington The William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund invites you to the Discovery Conference 2006, Stone Soup: The Heat is On. Please click on this link https://www.regonline.com/StoneSoup to get up-to-date information and to register on line for the conference. Printed copies of the brochure will be mailed out next week, but we prefer that you use the online registration form if possible. You can view a copy of the brochure at the online registration link above. Additional questions or comments can be forwarded to Elaine Pace at 203-230-33330, ext. 13, or email at epace@wcgmf.org or to David at Children First, 630-3566.
The CCCYO
The Central Connecticut Civic Youth Orchestra (CCCYO) Music Director and Conductor John McDonald announces that the Orchestra's first rehearsal and registration of new members will be held on Thursday, October 26th from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at the Augusta Curtis Cultural Center. The CCCYO had a very successful Spring season, and seeks to increase its membership numbers by 100%. String and woodwind players who have at least a year and a half of experience on his or her instrument are especially encouraged to come to the October 26th rehearsal. For more information please send e-mail to meridenartstrust@yahoo.com or call Katrina S. Axelrod, Administrator, during the day or early evening at (203) 235-7445.
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NEWS ITEMS FROM Wallingford Early Childhood Alliance Resources Education = WE CARE Fall Workshops for WE CARE October 24, 2006: 6:15 p.m. at WE CARE Family Center/6 Fairfield Blvd. BEHAVIOR STRATEGIES FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD presented by Linda Grimm, director of Benhaven Learning Network, will help parents and early childhood teachers learn how to say “No” to children as part of the learning experience for both parent and child. November 2, 2006: 6:15 pm at WE CARE Family Center/6 Fairfield Blvd. BEST NEW BOOKS FOR KIDS presented by Ruth Gaffey/staff of the Wallingford Public Library, Children’s Dept, offers help to parents and teachers looking to find new and interesting material for children. Whether it is for home use or a special gift there are hundreds of new books waiting for a “good home.” Book lists will be provided and some raffle prizes for lucky families. For more information on both of these upcoming programs please call the WE CARE Family Center at 284-4019 or 294-2175. Programs are free but registration is required.
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Highland School 23rd Annual Craft Fair Highland School PTO will sponsor its 23rd annual Craft Fair on Saturday, December 2, 2006 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the school on Highland Avenue in Wallingford. There will be over 65 vendors selling items, such as jewelry, paintings, florals, holiday ornaments, woodworking, quilts, gift baskets, candy,knitting, sweatshirts, centerpieces, photography, animal treats, et cetera. Refreshments will be available including homemade apple crisp. Admission is free. For additional information contact the school or call 203-314-3413.
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DVD/VHS Drive and Game Drive The Meriden Jaycees will be sponsoring a Children's DVD/VHS Drive and Toy Drive from October 1st through the 31st. Additionally, DVDs will be collected for the mothers to watch. All items collected will be donated to a local domestic violence shelter. Some of the requested items include: board games, card games, easy puzzles, Legos, et cetera. Items can be new or gently used. Boxes will be located at Meriden fire stations. The fire stations are located at 168 Capitol Avenue (South Meriden), 61 Pratt Street, 561 Broad Street, 260 Sherman Ave., and 1075 East Main Street. Any donations will be greatly appreciated. Please contact Sara at 464-7939 with any questions or for more information about this project. The Meriden Jaycees is an organization that offers members the best opportunities for community action, leadership development, and career advancement to men and women 21-40 years of age. New members welcomed.
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Maloney Band News
It's competition time again! Maloney High School Band performed in their first competition this year at Lyman Hall this past Saturday. All the students were very nervous and excited to be performing their show to the music of Tower of Power. They did a spectacular job in competition by placing 3rd in their division and 3rd overall. Following their performance the kids felt exhilarated and very proud of themselves, as was every parent and supporter in the stands. Special thanks to the Director, Brian Cyr, Colorguard Instructor - Caralyn Vicino, Colin Mason , Percussion Instructor Caption Head, Don Fortin, Percussion Instructor, and Irene Sheades , Pit Instructor. Without their dedication and support the band would not have been able to perform beyond their expectations.
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Hugs not Drugs at St. Joseph School
The students, faculty and staff of Saint Joseph School, 159 West Main Street, Meriden, will form a human chain around the outside of the school building on Thursday, October 26th, to block out drugs and illegal substances from our school and to show that we are united and take a visible stand against drugs. Wednesday, October 25th, is “Hugs Not Drugs Day,” when students are invited to bring in their favorite stuffed animal to school. The Red Ribbon Campaign was started when drug traffickers in Mexico City murdered Kiki Camarena, a DEA agent, in 1985. This began the continuing tradition of displaying red ribbons as a symbol of intolerance towards the use of drugs.
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WALLINGFORD FAMILY YMCA MEN'S BASKETBALL LEAGUE Registration going on now. Season to start end of October through Feb. 2007. Playing on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Call for more information 203 269 4497
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Meriden Public Library Children's Library Announcing two New FREE passes to Museums!! We are pleased to announce we have just received two new passes for museums at the Meriden Public Library in the Children's Room - Imagine Nation Museum in Bristol, CT. The place to spark your imagination! This museum has ESPN Play Your Way, Greenhouse, Jungle Playscape and Climbing Wall, Otis Teaching Elevator, Kid Construction Zone, Cook Nook, Water Room, Creative Arts Center, Cyber Lab, 1940's Soda Fountain, and much more. Hours are Wednesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Saturdays 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Sundays 12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. and open until 8:00 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. Our other pass is for Earthplace, the nature discovery center in Westport, CT. Earthplace maintains a 62-acre wildlife sanctuary with trails, live wildlife for public viewing, and it hosts many public nature program and events. It also has an explorer clubhouse, tiny tree house, nature lab, backyard resource center, nature theater, and wildlife dioramas. Explore the ecology lab, Animal Hall, Trails & Gardens. The grounds are open 7:00 AM. until dusk. Building open 9:00 AM.- 5:00 PM. Monday-Saturday. 1:00 PM.-4:00 PM. on Sundays. These passes can be taken out for two days with a library card and driver’s license. For more information call the Children's Library at (203) 630-6347.


Are you ready for some fun?
Kiwanis Kapers is coming November 3rd and 4th. Kiwanis Kapers presents “Those Were The Days,” celebrating Meriden's Bicentennial and 55 years of Kapers. Join us for this highly entertaining variety show reflecting back on some of the more memorable moments of our past. This year’s show brings back some of our alumni performers and is filled with humor and a variety of acts sure to please first-timers as well as seasoned Kaper-goers. George says he's been warming up his vocals all summer long! Where? Maloney High School. When? November 3rd and 4th. Time? 8:00 p.m. All proceeds directly support Kiwanis-sponsored community activities. Tickets call Dave@ 537-6175.


9th Annual Haunted Hayride
Old Saybrook Fire Department is pleased to announce the 9th annual Haunted Hayride, 2006. All year long we put out the fires, but during Halloween, we ignite a blaze of scary for all to enjoy. A possessed tractor-drawn hay wagon leads you into the deep, dark, demented woods of Middlesex County. For more than 50 minutes, you will venture into the ghastly world of ghosts, goblins, and ghouls. In the fog, you'll be frightened by the eerie sounds of nature versus creature. Which are in front, which are behind, and witch are beyond? Where: CLARK MEMORIAL FIELD 210 ELM STREET & INGHAM HILL RD (Across from Pasta Vita), OLD SAYBROOK, CT When: THURSDAY OCT 19, FRIDAY OCT 20 & SATURDAY OCT 21 FRIDAY OCT 27, SATURDAY OCT 28 & SUNDAY OCT 29 TRAILER RIDES START AT DUSK 7:00 p.m. $10* ADULTS, CHILDREN UNDER 12 - $5*, *Bring a can of food to donate for the Shoreline Soup Kitchen & receive $1.00 off admission ADVANCE GROUP SALES OR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, VISIT: www.oldsaybrookfire.com_ (http://www.oldsaybrookfire.com/) *Groups of 20 or more, includes express admission. Thank you for supporting The Old Saybrook Fire Department, 310 Main Street, Old Saybrook, CT 06475 - An all volunteer non-profit organization.
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Meriden Children's Library Specials! FREE PROGRAMS! SIGN-UP! October 30th - HALLOWEEN PARTY-6:30 p.m. Come to our Halloween Party. Wear your costume and join in on the fun. Great stories, fun games, exciting crafts, delicious snacks, contests and lots more... For ages 3 & up. Sign-up in the Children's Library or by calling (203) 630-6347. November 13th - SCRAPBOOKING-6:30 p.m. Come to the Meriden Public Library and learn all about scrapbooking. For children in grades 2 and older, with adults welcome. Leticia Harduby, our staff professional scrapbooker, will be teaching children the art involved in scrapbooking. Bring your own personal items, such as recipes, pictures, or other items you would want to learn how to display with class. Sign up in the Children's Library, or call us at (203) 630-6347.
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Bradley Home Residents Big Winners! Congratulations to those Bradley Home Residents who won numerous ribbons at the Meriden Grange Fair and at the Durham Fair. The Bradley Home is a non-profit residential care home located in Meriden, CT.The residents showcased their talents by entering items made in weaving, crafts (scrapbooking and quilting), hand work (which included crocheting, knitting, counted cross stitch and embroidery). The residents brought home 22 ribbons out of 41 entries from the Meriden Grange Fai,r and 43 out of 41 entries from the Durham Fair. Special ribbons were awarded to Esther Fowler for her counted cross stitch sampler (Best of Show at the Meriden Grange Fair and Special Award at the Durham Fair); and to Maryann Bates for her scrapbook entry (Judges Special Award at the Durham Fair). Residents who entered items are: Esther Fowler, Maryann Bates, Fran Daly, Gert DeWitt, Charlotte Garvey, Marvis Kumm, Peggy Long, Barbara O'Brien, Addie Ozycz, Betty Wieland, Shirley Berardino, Eleanore Coughlan, Dorothy Davison, Kay Janiga, Phyllis Maynes, Bea Mulcahy, Marion Dossin, Selma McDonnell, Addie Mulquin, Edna Schuler, Al Westermeyer, Norm Landsberg and Dorothy Steele. The staff and other residents could not be any prouder of these talented individuals. Congratulations again, on being ribbon winners! Everyone did a fantastic job!
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Understanding Diabetes
The Village at Kensington Place and MidState’s Community Wellness Department will present a program entitled “Understanding Diabetes” on Monday November 13, 2006 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at The Village at Kensington Place. Jackie Hackbarth, RNC, BS, Clinical Coordinator at The LaPlanche Clinic will be the guest speaker. The program is free and open to the public. For further information, please call 237-0300.
PASTA SUPPER
The Civitan Club of Meriden/Wallingford will hold their 12th annual pasta supper to benefit the physically and mentally challenged youth and adults in the area on Wednesday, November 8th from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at St. Joseph Church, Rosary Hall, W. Main St. Meriden. Donation will be $7 for adults, $3 for children 6 to 12, and children 5 years and younger free. Tickets may be purchased at the door or from Norman Willmott at 634-0176.
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It's back! And it's bigger and better than ever! North Haven's #1 Haunted House! The 21st Annual Haunted House at Faith United Methodist Church will take place on Friday, October 27th and Saturday, October 28th at 81 Clintonville Road (Rte 22), North Haven, CT. Please note that on Friday, it will run from 6:30 - 10:00 and on Saturday it will run from 6:30 - 9:30 with doors opening at 6:00 on both nights. The cost of admission for the Haunted House is $5. A portion of the proceeds will directly benefit the North Haven Food Pantry.
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MERIDEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESS RELEASE
2 NEW EXHIBITS - 3 WEEKENDS ONLY - OPENING OCTOBER 29, 2006
THE MERIDEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS 2 EXHIBITS:
1. Meriden Personalities2. Halloween
The doors of the Andrews Homestead, the showcase of the Meriden Historical Society, will once again be open to the public with two new exhibits:
1. Meriden Personalities, depicting art and artifacts of randomly-selected famous Meriden personalities. They may have not all been born here – but Meriden is where they made their name, or Meriden was were they started out. People on display range from craftsmen and women, designers, writers, musicians, and people in sports.
2. Halloween exhibits Halloween artifacts, toys, etc. from the collection of members and friends of the Meriden Historical Society.
The two exhibits at the Andrews Homestead, will be open for a limited time only, between the hours of 1:00 pm and 4:00 pm:Sunday October 29, 2006Sunday November 5, 2006Sunday November 12, 2006Or by appointment. The Andrews Homestead, 424 West Main St. Meriden, is the little red building located between McDonald's and Ben Franklin School.
CONTACT INFORMATION: Ms. Chris Ruel – Exhibit co-curator - 860-349-1046Submitted by Ruth Borsuk – President – 203-237-8042
******THIS MIGHT BE TOO LATE, OCT. 24****
LEARN TO SAVE A LIFE AT THE MERIDEN YMCA!
The Meriden YMCA is offering an American Red Cross Infant/Child CPR class. This is a one-year certification. This course focuses on the special application of emergency cardiac and breathing skills for infants and children. This program will take place on Tuesday, October 24th from 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm at the Meriden YMCA. Pre-registration is required. To register; please contact the Meriden YMCA at 235-6386.
** THE DATES ON THIS DON’T MAKE ANY SENSE AND TOO LATE****
MERIDEN YMCA BEGINS REGISTRATION FOR LIFEGUARD COURSE
The Meriden YMCA is conducting registration for the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training Course. Classes will be held and Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00 –9:00 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 21st from 10:00-4:00p.m. from Oct. 17- Nov. 14th.
No classes on Oct. 31 or Nov. 9th. Ellen Dubuc will be the instructor.
This course will include the following certifications: CPR/FPR, First Aid and Safety and AED. Telephone registrations are being taken with a major credit card or one can register in person at the Meriden YMCA 110 West Main Street. Pre-registration is required for this class. For further information or to register; Please call (203)235-6386 ext. 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.co
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MERIDEN YMCA OFFERS AMERICAN RED CROSS BABY-SITTING CERTIFICATION COURSE
This certification program is designed for today’s 11- to 15-year-olds. This training course gives participants the knowledge, skills, and confidence to care for infants through school-aged children. This program addresses safety issues, preventing injuries and illnesses, basic child care, first aid, decision-making skills, and age appropriate behavior and play. Participants learn by doing and are required to demonstrate several first aid skills including rescue breathing and dealing with a choking victim. Class will take place on Saturday, December 9th from 9:00 - 4:00 p.m. Pre-registration is required. Please contact the Meriden YMCA at 235-6386 to register today!
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COME JOIN MERIDEN YMCA’S MASTERS ADULT SWIM PROGRAM
This program is designed for those adults 19 years of age and older who wish to work out with other adults accompanied by a certified swim coach. The purpose of this program is to promote fun, fitness, safety and possibly competition for all participants of whatever level of ability and interest. This program will run three days a week; Monday and Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:45p.m and Thursdays from 8:00 to 9:00p.m. through December 14th. Participants can start at any time. For further information or to register; please contact Lisa Hoover at (203)235-6386; ext 12 or lhoover@meridenymca.com
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Brian David Doenig of Wallingford has been Awarded the 2006 Milton Fisher Scholarship due to his Designing of a Memorial Garden
The 2006 Milton Fisher Scholarships for Innovation and Creativity have been awarded to Brian David Doenig, along with seven other Connecticut students in recognition of their successful efforts to solve problems in innovative ways or to encourage creativity in their communities. From a strong applicant pool, the selection committee chose eight scholarship award winners this year. Winners receive grants from $2,000 to $5,000, depending on financial need (although the winners are selected without regard to need, the amount of each grant depends on financial need). Five honorable mentions earned grants of $1,000 each. The scholarship was open to high school juniors and seniors and college freshmen from Connecticut. To be eligible, a student had to either attend high school in Connecticut or plan to attend college in Connecticut (or both). The winners were all students who showed unusual initiative and creativity. Their innovations were in fields that included the arts, public affairs, humanitarian crises, health, and sports. The scholarship program welcomes applicants who demonstrate creativity in any field. Doenig innovatively and creatively designed and remolded an abandoned lot into a memorial garden. These original ideas thus qualified him as one of the eight awardees of the Milton Fisher scholarship The Renee B. Fisher Foundation established this scholarship in memory of Milton Fisher, whose life was marked by a passion for innovative and creative problem solving that extended across a broad range of fields of endeavor. Milton Fisher was also passionate about encouraging others to take the initiative in finding innovative and creative solutions to the problems around them, in their personal and professional lives and in the lives of their families and communities. The scholarship is administered by The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven.
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Holiday Bazaar
“A Village Christmas,” South Meriden Trinity Methodist Church, 145 Main Street, South Meriden
November 18th, 9:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Handmade Grafts - Luncheon Café, Baked Goods - Jewelry
Contact: Edie Marcantonio ,235-4810 Nite – 235-5759 Daytime
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Join us at St. Andrew’s, 20 Catlin Street, Meriden, Ct. Winter Wonderland Holiday Fair!
Saturday, November 4th, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Featuring local crafters, basket and tabletop tree raffle, bake table and café featuring sandwiches, hot dogs, soup, chili, and homemade “Trinity” Apple Crisp.
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La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford
If you are nursing or planning to breastfeed your baby, please join La Leche League of Meriden/Wallingford at our next meeting.
Meeting Topics Include:
Advantages of Breastfeeding to Mother and Baby Baby Arrives: The Family and the Breastfed Baby
The Art of Breastfeeding and overcoming difficulties
Nutrition and Weaning
Meeting Location: New Life Church, 92 Main St. South Meriden,CT
Meeting Dates: Third Wednesday Of each month at 9:45a.m.
Leaders: Jaime: 203-284-9735 Laura: 860-583-8996 Maryann: 203-630-0046
(Leaders are also available to answer breastfeeding questions over the phone. Please call for more information or directions)
La Leche League groups also meet in Cheshire, Hamden, Middletown, Rocky Hill and Southington. Call for more information or go online at www.lalecheleague.org
BABIES ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETINGS
North Haven Garden Club Holiday Luncheon
The North Haven Garden Club presents the 2006 Holiday Luncheon on Thursday, November 30th at 11:00 at the New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave. with a Boutique, Raffle and Gourmet Table. The Program will be “The Little Black Dress” with Bill Graham, floral designer and lecturer. Donations are $35.00. For reservations, please call 203-239-3656 by Nov 21st.
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PARENTS & KIDS FOUNDATION, INC. Of Wallingford
Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is a humanitarian and educational organization guided by the principles of faith and social responsibility, or “caring and sharing.” We serve people in the following ways: Counseling: is provided for individuals, families, women, couples, and children. A variety of support groups on various topics are offered. Call for appointments and schedule/description of activities. Recent groups: “Fun On Friday,” (art and conversation) “ Painting, Poetry, Pottery and Pizza” (women’s night out) “My Time” (nutrition, health, weight loss, exercise) Parenting / Family Education: “Raising Kids For Fun and Profit” is our trademark parenting program which focuses on communication and cooperation, discipline and decision making, rights and responsibilities, choices and consequences, and what it means to be “family.” Delivered with lots of humor and anecdotes. “We Are What We Eat or I Am A Chocolate Chip” is Nancy’s newest addition to the presentation developed because so many of our children and families are nutritionally deficient and in ill health. Chronic disease is out of control and most of it is nutritionally related and easily rectified. French fries are not vegetables. Broccoli is not a town in Italy. Fast Food on a plate is not a home cooked meal. An apple a day really will keep the doctor away and other truths I learned from my mother. Holiday Community Dinners: served Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, provide more than 500 meals each holiday. The meals are free. Transportation is provided as needed. Volunteers deliver meals and visits to the homebound, wrap presents, and write notes of encouragement. We strive to make everyone feel like they are “coming home” for the holidays. Much of the food is donated and completely prepared by volunteers. Come and join us. Adopt -A -Family grew from the holiday dinners. We have “adopted” individuals, families, nursing home residents without family, homeless shelter residents, and 100 children with AIDS. We sent holiday meals to residents in a home for the mentally retarded and gift baskets to their families. We provided materials and an instructor to a group of women learning to sew, and an artist to teach painting classes. As a need arises, we try to meet it. School Supplies Program: From paper, pens, pencils and notebooks, to backpacks, lunch boxes, sneakers, hats, gloves, jackets and more. Many children are provided the opportunity to begin their school year well supplied. Motivational Speaking: on Leadership, Communication, Positive Parenting, Nutrition and Health, and more. Guaranteed to send every audience out empowered. Focused and funny! Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is a private non-profit organization that believes children grow best in nurturing families. Nurturing families make nurturing communities. We are committed to strengthening people in all that we do. For more information on how you can become involved in any of our programs, please call. Together we can make such a wonderful difference! God’s peace and every blessing!
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Southwest Conservation District 60th Annual Meeting
Where: City Hall Building, 110When: Monday, October 30, 2006, at 7:00 p.m.
Meet: “Atka” The WCC’s Arctic
Gray Wolf!
The Conservation District services our 43 Townships in Southwest Connecticut with information, education and technical assistance to our municipalities and their private landowners regarding natural resource conservation, preservation and protection. Please join us and meet the Directors and Staff of your Conservation District. If you’re not familiar with the District, there will be plenty of information, displays to demonstrate who we are and an opportunity to discuss issues regarding our efforts to promote and preserve natural resource conservation and protection throughout our region and the state. The annual Meeting agenda will be comprised of brief District business topics, Nomination & Election of Directors, a presentation of Regional Conservation District Awards followed by a presentation on “Wolf Conservation” by the Wolf Conservation center’s Director of Education, Maggie Howell. For more Information on this program please call (203) 269-7509 or email to SWCD43@sbcglobal.net Conservation District Website: www.conservet.org
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Annual Holiday Festival
St. John Lutheran Church and Preschool proudly presents out Annual Holiday Fair Saturday, November 11, 2006, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.. We will have all new crafters and vendors, PLUS plenty of free, off-street parking, so come early for the great special. Come for lunch. Come for the homemade pies for sale, but please come and check out our newly expanded fair. St. John Lutheran Church & Preschool, 520 Paddock Avenue, Meriden, Ct.
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WINE TASTING
The Wallingford Junior Woman’s Club and the Wallingford Symphony Orchestra will present a Wine Tasting on Friday, October 27, 2006, from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., at Bristol Myers Squibb Company, 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford. Wine distributors will showcase over 30 wines as well as samplings of micro brews. The tasting is coordinated by Wallingford Wine and spirits. Appetizers will be served, and each guest will receive a complimentary wine glass. The event is open to the public. This charity event will benefit both non-profit organizations. The evening’s proceeds will be returned to the community through their many service projects. Advance tickets, $25 per person, are available from members of each organization. At the door, tickets will be $30. Tickets are also available from the Wallingford Juniors by calling Kathy Schave (203-949-1638) or from the Wallingford Symphony by calling Ann Whitman (203-284-2376). Wine offerings coordinated by Wallingford Wine and Spirits
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To The Editor:
With many moments in our lives, take one moment to say a kind word or do a good deed. Life is too short, and a little bit of kindness goes a long way. Whatever you do, it’s a smile you give someone or an ear to listen to what they have to say that means so much. Showing a little compassion doesn’t cost anything, but the outcome is worth millions. I wish every day would be that one moment in life. Jo-Ann Buccetti Wallingford
This is another true, funny story to add to my journal. My friend’s niece has a friend whose dog had died. She wanted to have it cremated, and read that there was a place in New York that charged only $30. She put the dead dog in a suitcase, took a train to New York. While she was on the train a young guy asked her what was in the suitcase. She told him it was a computer. As they came to their stop in New York and were getting off the train, the man turned around punched the girl in the face and ran off with the suitcase. I would love to have seen the look on his face when he opened the suitcase. Written by Jo-Ann Buccetti
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The Polish League of American Vets Chapter 189 Ladies Auxiliary Coming Events
November 13th,2006, we are going to see an afternoon of Divine Comedy, Father Aloysius and a superb lunch at John J. Sullivans Restaurant, full meal and dessert and tip included. Cost is only $64. Payment and signup is due two weeks prior to the trip at the Club 193 East Main St. Meriden. The bus leaves at 10:30 from Bee St. commuter parking lot, and returning around 3:30. See ya there!
December 2nd, 2006, come join us for the Festival of Lights and Father Pat and lunch at Morins. Visit the Shrine in Attleboro, Massachusetts, and then the Festival of Lights. See the Holiday Concert, enjoy Mass, the Nativity Set, gift shops, and a delicious lunch with the works at Morins Restaurant. We leave at 10:00 a.m. from Bee Street commuter parking lot and return about 9:00 pm. Tip and everything included. Cost is $53 and must sign up and pay two weeks prior to the trip at the Club on 193 East Main St. Meriden, Ct.
March 11th, 2007. We leave from the Bee Street commuter parking lot for Mohegan Sun Casino. The cost is $20. Includes free bet, free buffet. We leave at 8:00 a.m. and return about 5:30. Trip must be signed up and paid two weeks prior to the date at 193 East Main St. Meriden.
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We Are What We Eat
Cancer kills more children than any other disease. One in eight American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Heart disease kills more women than cancer. One in two men will have cancer in his lifetime. Americans spend $330 billion per year on heart disease. One in four children is obese. Most kids think French fries are vegetables. Some kids think broccoli is a town in Italy. This is the bad news. The good news is that most of these statistics will change if we simply change the way we eat. Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. is sponsoring a six-week information and education series that will support people who want to improve the quality of their lives by changing the way we look at food. The program will be led by Nancy Freyberg, MA. Whether you are overweight and undernourished, tired of being sick and tired, thick or thin, trying to raise healthy kids in a junk food world, and feel like you are losing the battle, this program is for you. We will learn the difference between habits and heredity, treatment vs. prevention, how your body works when it takes food in, how to read labels, foods to always eat and those to never eat, truth and lies of advertising and how and where to shop. The best exercise and diet is the one you will do, so a personal program for your body type and personality will be designed. This is a program for real people who live in the real world and have to make real choices with the time, money and schedules they live with. Guest speakers will include a naturopathic physician, nutritionist, and fitness trainer. We will sample foods, share recipes, ask and answer all your questions and have lots of fun learning new ideas that really work. This program is for young people, senior citizens, and everyone in between. Two groups, limited to 10 participants in each, will meet 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, or 9:30 – 11:00 a.m. Saturdays. The cost is $75. Please call Nancy Freyberg at 284-8299 to register for the class An apple a day really can keep the doctor away!

Stories from the Late October issue of The People's Press

Double shot of Bill – An amazing growth of writing in 4 years!
22 Diamonds and Dreams Come True - (2006) By Bill Mercuri
“Yes, there’s a heaven. It’s the place dreams come true.” Field of Dreams
I once thought, and might have even written it down somewhere, that heaven was in Flushing Meadows. That was where Shea Stadium, home to the heroes of my youth, the New York Mets, was located. I was off by a couple of hundred miles. Heaven is really in Cooperstown, New York, where you’ll find Cooperstown Dreams Park. With the lush green Adirondack mountains as a backdrop and 22 baseball diamonds, complete with dugouts, lights, and fan viewing areas as its centerpiece, Cooperstown Dreams Park plays host to hundreds of youth baseball teams from across the country and around the world. Every summer, for 11 weeks from June through August, thousands of twelve-year-olds, mostly boys, but a few girls, too, descend on this sprawling complex to realize the dream of their young lives; a week of nothing but high fastballs and low line drives, of diving catches and daring steals, all played on the finest diamonds in the quiet little town where the great game was born. The park is itself the realization of a dream. Lou Presutti III, a 50-something-year-old man, of average build and dark features befitting of his Italian heritage, remembers his grandfather telling him that every kid in America should have the chance to play baseball in Cooperstown. He said that when Lou was just five years old while they were visiting the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. The words stuck, and after Lou’s grandfather died in 1992, he actively pursued the dream and brought it to life in the form of this magnificent facility in the summer of 1996. The park, with its beautifully manicured fields, concession stands, hospitality tents, baseball village and Cooperstown Dreams Park souvenir shop spreads out nicely over countless acres of what looks to have once been farmland off state Route 28. Believe it or not, you might miss it if you’re not paying attention. If you’re heading east and pass Rock of Ages headstone sales located right across the street from the cemetery, you’ve gone too far. If you hit the steakhouse with the great little bar and jukebox that whines country music from years gone by, you’ve still gone too far, but you might want to stop in; it’s the unofficial food and drink exchange of coaches, umpires and parents throughout the week. Once inside the park you’ll have the opportunity to hear Lou talk passionately about his grandfather, an Italian immigrant, and his love of baseball, a game he learned to play well enough that he played semi-professionally for many years. He’ll tell you of his grandmother being a five Gold Star mother during World War II, her five boys, one of them Lou’s father, fighting for our freedom. You soon realize that this week will be as much about tradition as it is baseball. I’m at the park during the ninth week of competition this summer. There are 96 teams competing, but they can’t play baseball all day. So what do 96 teams, each made up of an average of 12 players and an over-stuffed staff of coaches, do after the final out is in the books? If there are no more games scheduled for the day and there’s enough daylight left they can meet up with the rest of their families and head down Route 28 to the center of Cooperstown and its beautifully restored homes, many shops, and, of course, the Baseball Hall of Fame. Most downtime is spent in the baseball village. It’s a true village in many respects. Bunkhouses line neatly paved asphalt lanes. There are friendly, familiar faces at every turn. A large, sweeping hospitality tent serves as a combination diner, town common, and late night movie theater. This is my first trip to Cooperstown Dreams Park. I’m there as an umpire, invited by the Avon (CT) Athletics. To participate in the tournament each team must supply an umpire. Because of their traditional blue uniforms, umpires are commonly called “blue.” Familiar references are “You’ve got to be kidding me, blue” or, “Blue, you must be blind.” Every once in a while a scowling coach will begrudgingly mumble, “Good call, blue.” Umpires are the game’s policemen, impartial arbiters vested with the power to have the final say. They are great fans of the game, its history and its traditions. More than anything, umpires are a close-knit fraternity who take great pride in the work they do. Following a short orientation and clinic on Saturday, umpires are assigned to crews of four or five. Each crew is then assigned to work one of the 22 fields for the week. The umpires live in the baseball village where we mix right in with the players and coaches. Our bunkhouses are bunched together at one end of the complex. It’s like our “section” of the village. Besides it being my first trip to the park, I’m a rookie in other respects, too. Some of my colleagues are here for the sixth or seventh time. There are even some who haven’t missed a summer since the inaugural season of 1996. Experiencewise I’m dwarfed both in longevity and depth of knowledge by almost everyone around me. Sam Inman, an outgoing, upbeat schoolteacher from Charlotte, NC, does more games in two weeks than I do all summer. While I’ve been cutting my teeth over the past three years on Little League and Babe Ruth baseball, Sam’s been crisscrossing the south calling high level American Legion and college games. Intimidating? For about a minute. To Sam and the rest of my brothers I was one of them, no questions asked. We all learn from one another, and over the course of the week we offer one another nothing but encouragement, support, advice, and more than enough good-natured ribbings. The umps display a great deal of comfort in their little piece of the village. You can usually find them sitting in small groups of two or three outside the barracks trading stories while engaging in an age-old ritual of any uniformed professional – polishing their black shoes to a glistening shine. Others, like one of my bunkmates, Gary Cenna from Philadelphia, seek refuge from the midday sun by sitting in the cooler brick building. Gary reads the rule book aloud like poetry. Umpires can be eccentric. The bunkhouses, rows and rows of them totaling about 60 in all, are evenly spaced with a thin swath of grass between them. The layout reminds me of a picture my father once showed me of Pine Camp, NY, where he reported for basic training before heading off to Europe and World War II. I have a hunch we’re going to have more fun at this camp. Each house is numbered and lettered and bears an oversized baseball trading card to the left of its screen door entrance. In most cases, the number on the barracks matches the number of the uniform worn by the baseball legend that graces the card. My address is 32A, Sandy Koufax. 42A is Jackie Robinson. Roberto Clemente strikes a proud pose at 21A. “You know, Clemente only let a few people call him ‘Bob,’” a fellow villager says to me as a way of breaking the ice. “He insisted on ‘Roberto.’” “Didn’t know that,” I said. Always impressed with that kind of detail, I know that I’m among friends. Baseball friends. Each house is furnished with a dozen or so brown metal bunkbeds fitted with metal springs and a thin plastic mattress. A week on one of these is sure to finance a chiropractor’s summer home. A molded plastic footlocker sits at the foot of the bed. We’re told to bring our own linens, blankets, and a small fan. We’re not told that the odds are good that at least one of the 14 or 15 other guys in your house will snore. Next time, bring earplugs. You won’t need an alarm clock; the sound of baseballs pinging off aluminum bats will wake you. The kids are excited to hit the fields and get to the batting cages early preparing for the day’s first games. The handful of female players and umpires bunk together in the Rockford Peaches bunkhouse, named for the legendary team from the Women’s Professional Baseball league of the 1940’s. There is the fully equipped Moonlight Graham infirmary where the staff is prepared for the worst but most often attend to scrapes and sprains of the players and the creaky joints of aging coaches and umpires. Community showers and bathrooms, definitely not for the squeamish, are centrally located. Add shower sandals to your survival kit list. The Dreams Park baseball office acts as the Village Hall. Outside of the office and at other points around the park are well-organized bulletin boards containing important information, such as game schedules, field assignments, Cooperstown activities, and up-to-the-minute game results, team records and rankings. It’s where the tournament buzz takes place. Like college students trying to view just-posted exam scores, players and coaches crowd around the glass-enclosed boards, jockeying for position, peering over and around each other, heads bobbing up and down to get the best view. If the village has an official business it’s the business of pin trading. Each team has had a uniquely designed team pin. Every player is provided with a limited supply of his team’s pin. Even the umpires are given a decent sized plastic bag full of umpire pins allowing them to interact with the next generation of great deal makers. Gathered on corners, spread out on a grassy field or squatting in the middle of a blacktop intersection, the traders start early in the day and give the park the feel of a Middle Eastern market. The goal is to acquire a pin from every team. Just as it is on the field, the competition is fierce. Like a real world commodity market, supply and demand, real or imagined, sets the market price of a pin. In week nine the most coveted pin is the “quarter” pin from Lakeville, Minnesota, which has as its center the Minnesota state quarter. The kids are having as much fun with the pins as they are with the bats and balls. A father, whose son’s team had been having a tough week on the field, managed a small smile as he told me how much his boy loved the pin trading. I nodded and said, “He’s learning more than baseball here this week. He’s learning how to talk to people, to negotiate, to make business deals.” The dad nodded back, his thin smile broadening. “That’s true. I didn’t think of it that way.” But if there’s one thing that stands out in the village, it’s the sounds. One afternoon while sitting outside of the hotel Sandy Koufax in one of the many green plastic lawn chairs that are scattered between the barracks, I heard one sound in particular. It was the sound of kids playing. I’m talking about backyard or in the street kind of playing. Playing that requires them to make up games and establish rules. Sounds of laughter and frantic yells for a still-rolling ball fill the air of an unblemished blue sky as the runner rounds the cardboard square and streaks for the bare spot in the grass, the imaginary runner having already scored. The sound makes me smile remembering a time when this was the norm. These sounds echo around streets and fields of Dreams Park all week long. The power of imagination and creativity is amazing when electronic games, television, and the Internet are absent. I’ve taken a week of vacation to volunteer and will umpire three to four games a day, mostly in midday heat, bunk with a bunch of snoring, middle-aged men, eat cafeteria food off a Styrofoam tray, and shower in a giant pool of hungry bacteria. And I can’t wait to get started. When it comes to baseball, everything about Cooperstown Dreams Park is first rate. The fields are incredibly well maintained considering the number of games played on them throughout the 11-week summer schedule. The atmosphere, with fan viewing areas stretching down the first and third base lines to the right and left field foul poles, can be riveting. Every game starts with six brand-new baseballs, each stamped with the Dreams Park red, white and blue logo. There are two parts to the week. The first half of the week begins on Sunday and runs through midday on Wednesday. During this time, teams play seven games in pool play. After pool play is complete, teams will be ranked based on overall record and average runs allowed. The team with the best record and least average runs allowed will be ranked number 1 with the worst overall team getting the lowest ranking. They’ll then be paired off in a single elimination tournament with the championship game being played under the lights at Championship Stadium following closing ceremonies. Top seeds get byes into the later rounds while the real Cinderellas need to scratch out three wins on Wednesday just to get to the quarterfinals and hopefully beyond on Thursday. Following a Saturday night of Olympic style opening ceremonies, with teams parading into a jam-packed stadium, and an all-star type skills competition, the games begin on Sunday. On Sunday morning a thin veil of fog lifts from the park like a curtain rising on a Broadway show. The early morning air is crisp and soaked with anticipation. Teams and families have come from every corner of the country and Canada. From the Southwick (MA) Scream to the Bloomington (MN) Bandits, the Rappahannock (VA) Eagles to the Ronkonkoma (NY) Cardinals, the Toluca (CA) Titans to the South Jersey Sandsharks, America’s game has called them to a very special place where they’ll live their dream in the days to come. At 8:30 a.m., 22 games on 22 fields start simultaneously. Before a pitch is thrown, the National Anthem is played from a central location in the park so that it can be faintly heard at all venues. Players and coaches line the baselines and respectfully remove their caps. Tradition. The teams are dressed out in Dreams Park issued red or blue jerseys and matching cap. Baseball pants are white and must be worn at the knee showing off solid red or blue athletic socks. Tradition. The message is clear; it’s the player in the uniform and not the uniform itself that matters. Baseball tradition. Most of the boys are 12 years old and will be moving from the 60-foot bases of little league to the 90-foot bases of higher levels of play next year. The fields at Cooperstown Dreams Park help them take that step gradually. The bases are 75 feet, and pitcher’s mound not quite at the big league distance of 60 feet, 6 inches from home plate. Developing muscles, especially arms, run a lower risk of injury. All other rules such as leading off the bases are just like the major leagues. In fact, the tournament as the “little majors.” One thing is very evident from the first pitch I see on field 10: every single one of these kids wants to be here. They love to play. They love the game. The smile is the official logo worn by every player. There are plenty of talented kids on display this week, and while the range of talent is broad, the level of play is generally pretty good. But the more I talk to people, the more I’m discovering that the dream doesn’t necessarily exist in wins and losses. The essence of the dream is in the stories that are playing out and the lessons that are being learned. My first game that Sunday is as home plate umpire for a game involving the Alaska Quakes. Mike Keiffer, a hulking man with a deep voice that fits his frame, coaches the team from the third base coaches box. I had a chance to talk with him the night before and learned that this will be the first game that his kids will play together as a team. In Alaska, they play for only about a month, and none of his boys have ever played a game under artificial lighting. They play a night game or two this week, and just that in itself will be a dream come true. Mike has been involved for several years, and the constant energy required to raise money and maintain fields and schedule games and tournaments and grow the league may wear on him, but he knows it’s all worthwhile when one of his players tell him that this is the “best time of his life, so far.” Throughout the game, a close game in which the Quakes would play well but lose, Mike claps his hands together and offers encouragement and some light-hearted chatter to his boys. “Guys, this is the first game this year we haven’t had moose walking across the field! And who’s on bear watch?” The city kids in the opposing dugout are from just outside of Philadelphia. They look at him like he’s from another world. In many respects he and his Quakes are. When I’m not umping a game, I like to walk the park and catch some of the other games. On Wednesday, another flawless day on the weather front, I hear what sounds like maracas coming from the fan section of field 8. I pop my head in to investigate. It’s the supporters of the Gulf Coast Braves and their makeshift noisemakers, empty plastic water bottles filled with pebbles. They also have a small boom box that plays only one tract, the annoying tomahawk chop chant made famous by the Atlanta Braves. But when you think dreams this week, you have to put this team and its fans at the top of the list. The Gulf Coast Braves are from Gulfport, Mississippi. Most of the boys on the team lost their homes in hurricane Katrina not even a year ago. For them to be in Cooperstown this week is more a miracle than a dream. What happened last September might still be fresh in their minds and will have long-lasting effects on their lives, but on this day their attention is on playing a game and living a dream that will let them, at least temporarily, put the hardships of last September out of mind. Mediocre during pool play, the Braves are seeded fairly low but are starting to gel in the single elimination tournament. They’ve already won once and are on the verge of knocking out the much higher seeded West Hartford (CT) All-Stars. Next up is an 8:00 p.m. game against a top 10 team, the Raleigh Redwings. Winning that game would be a tall order and would move the miracle team to Thursday’s quarterfinals. I’ll check back later. On my way to another game, passing by a crowded concession stand where Abbott and Costello’s “Who’s on First” broadcasts from the speakers, I’m intercepted by a few of my new umpire buddies. They want to head into town to the steakhouse and have a few beers. A slight twist of the arm convinces me. There’ll be plenty baseball tomorrow, and I can check the bulletin board to see how the Gulfport vs. Raleigh game turns out. At the steakhouse bar there are a few locals sprinkled in the crowd of patrons who would otherwise not be here but for the Dreams Park. With me are three of my closest running mates for the week. Besides Carolina Sam, who will share some southern culture with me by explaining in detail the difference between liver pudding and liver mush, is Dave Palenshus, a former Navy man from Ridgefield, Washington. Dave and I logged a lot of miles around the park during the week and shared more than a few beers and laughs. Richard Redding is just what you would expect from someone from the small town of Bessemer City, North Carolina. He’s the colt of the umpire stable. Barely 22 years old, Richard has a Huck Finn type appearance, looking like he just came strolling down a dirt road or out of a countryside creek. He has an unbridled enthusiasm and love for baseball and a North Carolina drawl to complete his character. We all have game assignments in the morning, yet we let time slip away. By the time we get back to the village it’s 1:00 a.m. The fog we are so used to seeing in the waking hours of the day is just now arriving, settling in over the Mercury vapor lights on field 10. Lights at 1:00 a.m.? Why are there still lights on and a crowd so boisterous that it sounds like thousands rather than the hundred or so that’s really there? On the way to investigate, we run into Marty Glynn who has just called the game. Gulfport and Raleigh battled for 11 innings - six is regulation - with the Redwings ending the Brave’s impressive run. The kids left homeless by Katrina have a new home and many new fans in Cooperstown. Thursday is the final day of competition. Quarter- and semifinal games take place in the morning and afternoon, and the championship game under the lights at a packed championship stadium. Making it through to the title game are the Chicago North All Stars and the Arizona Stealth. But before they square off, there are closing ceremonies. The umpires lead the parade into the stadium. As we gather and wait for this grand event to get under way, we shake hands and exchange contact information, expressing what a pleasure the week had been and hoping to see each other again next year during the same week nine. I pass around a baseball with the Cooperstown Dreams Park logo on it for all the guys to sign: Phil Nelson, a proud grandfather from Wichita, Kansas. Alex Estefan, “El Cubano,” from Chicago. His father left Castro’s Cuba for a better life and brought the love of baseball with him, passing it on to his son. Lou Girolamo, an IRS agent from Syracuse. Chick DeLoach, a soft-spoken southern gentleman from King George, Virginia. The parade approaches the entrance to the field. We are introduced to the crowd one by one and run on a white carpet from the third baseline out toward second base where we shake the hand of Lou Presutti, the original dreamer. Lou thanks you and hands you a ring. It’s a ring of the class ring variety, complete with a green stone, green as the surrounding mountains and diamond infields. Inscribed is “AYB (American Youth Baseball) Hall of Fame. Cooperstown. Little Majors.” Every umpire, player and coach will receive one with which to remember this incredible week. After some final handshakes and good byes, I decide to get an early start home. I slowly roll down the long winding driveway, reluctant to wake up from my own dream. Before turning left onto magical Route 28, I take one last look in the rearview mirror. The lights are on, the stadium full, and the dreamers are still dreaming.
Baseball on the Radio – Those were the days! (2003)
By Bill Mercuri
Before there were 573 channels, satellite dishes, and digital cable. Before television came to us in “living color” and yes, before television period, baseball was our national pastime, and the voices of radio brought it to life. As we enter October, the month named after Reggie Jackson, pennant races will wind down while the World Series kneels in the on-deck circle. I think back to the summer that just blew past and how I enjoyed listening to Joe Castiglione and Jerry Trupiano, my two pals who occupy the broadcast booth at Red Sox games, home and away, from April to October. Listening to them call the game gives you the feeling that you’re sitting right there in the bleachers as the action is recreated in your mind. Baseball is so much more suited for radio rather than television. Those who say that baseball is boring have most likely only experienced it on television. Even with cameras mounted on the umpire and catcher or the convenience of instant replay, baseball on television is one-dimensional, not able to capture all of the nuances that make the game what it is. To refer to the broadcasters as simply announcers is so unfair. They are storytellers. The cadence and inflection of their voice, the use of crowd noise, pausing at just the right moment to create a moment of suspense, are all props that they use to shape our imaginations. That’s the beauty of it. We have to think, imagine, daydream, in a sense. They make us “see” the third baseman “creeping in” to protect against a possible bunt; the ball sailing just over the out-stretched glove of a diving shortstop or a home run “bending” around the foul pole. This is how baseball should be experienced. In the days when radio was king, now legendary voices were as much a part of the baseball fan’s life as the players themselves. Red Barber, in Brooklyn, Jack Buck in St. Louis, Mel Allen with the Yankees, and Jack Brickhouse with the Cubs made life-long fans of an entire generation in the cities in which they practiced their trade. Roger Kahn, in his book “The Boys of Summer,” describes listening to Brooklyn Dodger games on the radio in his room as a young boy, and as the action was being described he would open his window and could hear the roar of the crowd coming from nearby Ebbets Field. He lived and died with the Dodgers, and radio was the link between him and his heroes. The portability of the radio itself allows us to take the game with us wherever we go, whatever we’re doing. On the porch, in the car, at the beach, we’re at the game. And since the game is always with us, we’re able to remember where we were when the impossible happened. In 1986 the Red Sox were on the verge of having their season end at the hands of the California Angels, down to their last strike in this playoff series. I was driving between Champaign, Illinois and Chicago with a Red Sox fan from Boston. Already resigned to defeat, we nearly drove off the road in jubilation when Dave Henderson knocked a Donnie Moore pitch over the left field wall to give the Sox new life in a game they would go on to win. Maybe listening to the game in the car is hazardous to your health! So as the play-offs and fall classic approach, why not give radio a try. Kick back, have a beer, turn off the TV, and enjoy the drama as presented by today’s artists of the airwaves.

Unedited Following – Old Stories
Hoppy Halloween (or, The Best Costumes I’ll Never Be Able to Pull Off)
By Maura K. Ammenheuser
My 2-1/2-year-old son picked out his Halloween costume. He’s dressing as frog this year. Since bringing home his little green fleece suit, he’s hopped happily around the house. “Hey, Ryan, what do you say on Halloween?” I asked him, meaning “trick or treat!” and “thank you.” “Rrribbitt!” So much for etiquette. As my son leapfrogs through the family room, I long for a costume, too. Something ingenious. Like one of my high school friends who showed up at a party wearing a white sweat suit bedecked with, well, garbage. “Ron, what are you supposed to be?” (Are you ready?) “White trash!” Or the coworker who pasted cereal boxes all over a unitard and secured her chignon with knives. She was, of course, a “cereal killer.” (How is it that my fondness for bad puns never inspired bring-down-the-house get-ups for myself?) Well, if Ryan can become a rrribbitting amphibian for a few hours, there are definitely some people I’d like to be for a day. For instance: Martha Stewart. I’d bleach my hair, sprinkle my speech with some fake highfalutin’ accent (i.e., “mar-i-NAHD,” meaning the mystery goop I slop onto chicken two seconds before grilling it) and decorate my house with handmade gold-plated beaded marzipan jack-o-lantern luminaries, which can be eaten later with a drizzle of raspberry truffle Dom Perignon sauce, kept chilling in the fridge for just such an occasion. The real appeal of being Martha, of course, is that she obviously maintains an invisible army of kitchen and garden trolls who do all the chopping, mixing, peeling, tinting, vacuuming, scrubbing, scraping, digging and cursing for her behind the scenes, so good ol’ Martha never looks bad, kills the tomato plants or burns the house down. Where can I get some of those? Do they have them at Kmart, in housewares? The Bad Hair Fairy. Oh, you know what she looks like. Skinny, with blue acrylic nails, a naval ring and a dyed-red, sexy tousle of shiny hair you know required an entire can of mousse to control but nonetheless looks fantastic. You think, wow, this chick can cut some hair. She sure can. The Bad Hair Fairy chops off your bangs 10 seconds after you tell her you just want a trim, hacks inch-long layers into the tresses you’ve been growing out for a year, teases your locks into a poodle-like frizz the likes of which you haven’t seen since that perm you got in junior high, pops her gum, says, “Oh, this looks cute on you” as you’re passing out from shock and then charges you $35. You’ll know it’s me at your door as the Bad Hair Fairy when I shout, “trick or treat!” and blast you in the face with hair spray. Oprah Winfrey. She gets paid zillions to talk, discuss, blab, yakkity yak, then talk some more. Oh yeah, and to read books. How did I miss out on this gig? Everybody loves her (cattle ranchers notwithstanding). And she’s gorgeous even when she’s fat. For this costume I need the hair du jour, designer clothes, a rich boyfriend and a studio audience of five dozen women with whom I can bond. Madonna. This disguise takes some long-term planning. I’ll need to work out with a personal trainer for a few years, perfect enough yoga moves to allow acrobatic writhing on an arena stage, burden two children with the most hideous names possible and when things get dull, piss off the Pope. On the other hand, the actual outfit involved should be easy. It could be anything. Geisha robes, metallic bustier, flouncy wedding dress, an iron lung. Whatever. Seriously. Would anything Madonna wears surprise you? The Boss from Hell. This costume’s tricky. After all, Bosses From Hell have more than one look. So the key to this impersonation lies in the behavior. Eye twitches and A.D.D.-like hyperactivity are good clues. But to pull off this act, I’d concentrate on the unpredictable nature of the beast. For example, the Boss From Hell asks politely for your permission to use your latest professional faux pas as a learning tool during the next staff meeting, then shrilly eviscerates you in front of 30 colleagues; interrupts your Easter dinner, urgently demanding your presence at the office to handle what you later discover was a minor incident that unfolded nowhere near your customers; or dumps three days’ worth of work on your desk at noon on Friday and after you stay late to complete it, rants that you’re racking up unauthorized O.T. and you need better time management skills. Yes, the Boss from Hell is a truly frightening figure, very appropriate for Halloween. She comes complete with productivity charts, an armload of Steven Covey books and a cattle prod. Yikes – I’m scaring myself. Maybe it’s best that I just experience Halloween through the eyes of my toddler after all. His greatest glee is hopping up the stairs; his worst nightmares involve nothing more torturous than having his toenails clipped. Maybe this year I’ll dress up as something that doesn’t require advance planning, lots of practice or a menacing, heebie-jeebie look. I’ll just tour the neighborhood as a somewhat disheveled, scatterbrained but well-meaning wife and mother. I’ll carry a video camera, a flashlight and warm fuzzies in my heart. I won’t wear a cute froggy costume. But still, this Halloween will be positively rrribbitting. A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort. -Herm Albright

THE THIRD KEY
By Alice Mary Scott
Don’t think that marriage is always a journey of togetherness. You know better, so when I say I started the journey of my life alone—don’t question that. I have only three keys on my key ring for all the locks in my life. Perhaps my world is oversimplified, but simplification is something I strive for and this is where I’ve arrived. My home and my car key are mandatory. In today’s world, locking both is a necessity. The third key not only complicates my life, but is the only complication therein. It unlocks my mother’s door—my childhood home until the age of 21 when I married, left home and started the journey of my life alone. Mom is also alone now, and although she’s led a full life, at 84 she’s becoming a bit confused. She’s overwhelmed easily by simple things such as receiving a stack of mail; sorting the bills from stacks of junk—too afraid to just throw the bulk of it out for fear of missing something important. Yet, I find bills that have gone unpaid for months when there’s no financial reason for it. Her paper shredder is the enemy here—one she likes to blame for the misplacement of important papers—as though it was the shredder’s fault that something has gone missing. The key to mom’s door is used frequently. At one time, I would never have entered my parents’ home without knocking or ringing the bell and waiting for an answer. I still knock or ring, but enter immediately to save my mom a painful trip to let me in. Entering has become painful for me as well as complicated. Painful because my memories were always wonderful; family, good food, holidays packed with good friends and neighbors along with my siblings and their spouses. Those memories will, unfortunately, be tempered with the present situation in the, hopefully, many more years to come. My younger sisters and I take turns popping in on mom to check that she’s still able to care for herself, help with the cleaning and laundry, even the cooking when it becomes necessary. It’s obvious the day will come when she’s going to have to face leaving her home of almost 60 years. We’re attempting to help her plan for it, knowing that the move will wrench her life from its self-imposed solitude, pleasant reminiscences and daydreams. She’s happy now, but will she be happy in whatever Assisted Living Facility we ultimately decide on? I hope and pray for her continued happiness. This key and mom’s needs complicate my life, but it’s not really a chore. She’s a wonderful person—giving and loving, intelligent and resourceful. We love her dearly, and this slow deterioration is painful to watch. I find that I’m not enjoying writing about that third key and what it symbolizes for me. Soon, I’ll have only two keys and my life will be simple again—emptier. When my childhood home is gone to someone else, a young family perhaps, it will again serve its original purpose of giving shelter to a family with children: its big yard ringing with laughter once more, its rooms filled with struggling students, wonderful aromas from the kitchen, holidays again filled with friends and family.
Oh, who am I kidding? Even though I left years ago, I knew the place would still be there. It will be almost as much of an emotional wrench for me as for my mom. One of my anchors will be gone.

MY YOUTHFUL DAYS FISHING
by Francis W. Lappert
I was 12 years old and my young brother was 10 when our father told us to catch a can of night crawlers and he would take us bullhead fishing at Meremere Reservoir. We did so, and he rigged up several tarred drop lines, as he didn’t have any fishing poles. We took off and walked to the north end of the reservoir, as this was his favorite spot to catch a mess of bullheads. We followed a path down the west side until he came to his favorite spot. Each of our lines was about 60 feet long with a two-ounce sinker on the end to help us throw it out. Our father, who was an expert with the line, caught the first fish, a nice one about 12 inches long. After dealing with several tangled lines, my brother and I got the hang of it and managed to get several fish, added to what our father caught, we quit when we had a dozen. Our mother fried them up the next day for supper. After a few more trips with him, he let us go by ourselves. At that time Meremere had a great quantity of small-mouth bass. We asked our older brother, who was an expert fisherman, what would be the best bait to catch them. He told us small green frogs or crayfish. He said the best place to catch the frogs was in the swamp for their food. The crayfish we could get in the reservoir by lifting up flat stones along the shore. We both supplied our family with many a fish dinner. I’ve got to mention the fact that the park seemed to be a breeding ground for the copperhead snakes. We killed many of them even where the swimming pool now stands. Quite a few years later, when fishing by myself on the west side of the reservoir among the huge rocks on the shore, I had a dozen small frogs in my bait pail. I had just landed a nice two-pound bass and was reaching for the pail in back of me for another frog to bait the hook. My hand froze in mid-air for there in back of the pail was a large copperhead. I reached for a nearby rock, but he saw me move, and slithered down among the rocks. Needless to say, I got away from there fast. The area between Hubbard Park and the south end of the reservoir seemed to hold most of the snakes. I have never encountered a rattlesnake in all my hiking in these woods, but my sister Rose killed a 42- inch rattler while waking in the woods near the halfway house we call Fair View. It had eight buttons. I recall in later years someone introduced large-mouth bass and also pickerel to Meremere reservoir. The fishing improved tremendously. I once caught a seven-pound twelve-ounce bass on a black jitterbug plug fishing at night. I would like to mention also that Peregrine Falcons used to nest on the crags on the west side of the reservoir and once saw one carrying a large snake in its talons back to its nest on the cliff. There also used to be the red-tail hawks that were always trying to get one of our chickens in the backyard, but our father chased them away with his 12-gauge shotgun. A final note: Meriden has five water supply reservoirs, two of them teeming with fish, Meremere and Broad Brook. It’s tragic not one of them is a not available to local fishermen.

TAKE HOLD OF EVERY MOMENT
A friend of mine opened his wife’s underwear drawer and picked up a silk paper wrapped package: “This,” he said, “isn’t any ordinary package.” He unwrapped the box and stared at both the silk paper and the box. “She got this the first time we went to New York, eight or nine years ago. She has never put it on, was saving it for a special occasion. Well, I guess this is it. He got near the bed and placed the gift box next to the other clothing he was taking to the funeral house; his wife had just died. He turned to me and said: “Never save something for a special occasion. Every day in your life is a special occasion.” I still think those words changed my life. Now I read more and clean less. I sit on the porch without worrying about anything. I spend more time with my family, and less at work. I understood that life should be a source of experiences to be lived up, not survive through. I no longer keep anything. I use crystal glasses every day. I’ll wear new clothes to go to the supermarket, if I feel like it. I don’t save my special perfume for special occasions; I use it whenever I want to. The words “Someday…” and “One Day...” are fading away from my dictionary. If it’s worth seeing, listening or doing, I want to see, listen or do it now. I don’t know what my friend’s wife would have done if she knew she wouldn’t be there the next morning. This nobody can tell. I think she might have called her relatives and closest friends. She might call old friends to make peace over past quarrels. I’d like to think she would go out for Chinese, her favorite food. It’s these small things that I would regret not doing. If I knew my time had come, I would regret it, because I would no longer see the friends I would meet, letters... letters that I wanted to write “One of these days.” I would regret and feel sad, because I didn’t say to my brothers and sons, not times enough at least, how much I love them. Now, I try not to delay, postpone or keep anything that could bring laughter and joy into our lives. And, on each morning, I say to myself that this could be a special day. Each day, each hour, each minute, is special. Stop saying “One of these days.” Remember that “One day” is far away... or might never come...

“Sheltering an Animal’s Perspective”by Gregory M. Simpson, Vice-President - Meriden Humane Society, Inc.
It’s simple really. Make a promise. Keep a promise. It’s a big responsibility but a small thing to ask in order to receive unconditional love in return. Yet animal shelter staff look daily into the faces of animals where these promises were not kept. It does not matter whether the animal is purebred or not, as an estimated 25% of dogs in animal shelters are purebred, such as the one belonging to a man who appeared at a Wal*Mart Fill-a-Truck event and asked if the shelter would take his Chihuahua for which he had reportedly spent $800. “I don’t have time for it anymore,” he offered shamelessly. We live in a throwaway society where we don’t bother to fix things anymore. We just throw them away and get new ones. Unfortunately, this is not only true for inanimate objects. A man came to the shelter asking to trade in his older cat, which was incurring veterinary bills, for a “newer model.” We had to have a conversation about the word “commitment.” Make a promise. Keep a promise. College students going on summer break, folks closing up their summer homes for the season, couples having babies, people moving, the list goes on…..all reasons some animals become homeless. It’s just easier than fulfilling the commitment that was made. Make a promise. Keep a promise. We live in a society where the Humane Society of the United States estimates that there are three to four million adoptable dogs and cats are killed each year. Again, that’s three to four million killed. Shelters that kill animals prefer the term “euthanasia.” The dictionary defines euthanasia as “the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured individuals (as persons or domestic animals) in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy.” These are not hopelessly sick or injured animals. They are three to four million adoptable animals. Kill shelters prefer that no-kill shelters call themselves “open ended” shelters rather than no-kill. Words are powerful. Do not partake in putting a spin on reality in order to salve consciences. Once I spoke to a presenter at a humane society association conference after her workshop. She defended the role of kill shelters as “necessary.” “Someone has to do it,” she said as definitively as one would say the sky is blue. “I will never accept that premise,” I responded. “It’s all a matter of priorities,” I added. We live in a country where federal taxes are allocated 28.5% to the military and 1.4% for environmental protection. We could do more for the animals if there was the public will to do so. There is a qualitative difference between “people who like animals” and “animal people.” People who like animals think it would be a nice idea to have a pet – until another idea comes along and the animal is no longer convenient. Animal people would no more give up their companion animal than they would their child. With people who like animals, it is often more about them, than it is about the animal – hence the purchase of so many purebreds. Buying animals from breeders or pet stores only perpetuates atrocities like puppy mills and condemns an equal number of shelter animals to death. In contrast, animal people want to care for those needing homes, recognizing that loving, adoptable shelter animals come in all sizes and colors. People who like animals spend their weekends bringing their purebreds to dog and cat shows to win ribbons. Animal people spend their free time volunteering at animal shelters to help dogs and cats that are not their own. People who like animals think it would be a nice idea to have a pet – until it costs them money. Animal people find a way to care for their companion animal, no matter how meager their means. In New Haven I often see two homeless men pushing shopping carts full of empty soda cans. Each has a dog with him. One can tell by observing that the dog means the world to him. One even had cut out a shirt for his dog to wear. These men are animal people. It is not about money. It is about commitment. Make a promise. Keep a promise. Your companion animal would do no less for you.For the animals,Gregory M. Simpson, Vice-President - MERIDEN HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.
Gregory Simpson is Vice-President of the Meriden Humane Society, a no-kill shelter, and member of the Cat Writers’ Association. Formerly a state advisor to Friends of Animals, he was also named one of the 40 Ultimate Cat Lovers by CAT FANCY magazine.

RAINY DAY FUN WITH THE KIDS
By Joan GoodmanMeriden
As the weather forecaster announces the next rainstorm, the panic starts to build inside every parent. Their brain screams – what am I going to do with the kid(s)?!!! With a little creativity and a spirit of fun, both parents and kids can survive the weather, and even have a good time!
Fun At Home
For fun at home, there are numerous craft ideas and games to fit a range of ages and budgets. And you don’t need to be Martha Stewart. Your local library, the Meriden Family Resource Center, bookstores, and the Internet are all helpful sources. Here are some examples: Play Clay - Make homemade play dough and use cookie cutters to form it into animals or whatever your budding artist desires. The recipe is as follows: 2 cups of flour, 1 cup of salt, 2 cups of water (add whatever color of food coloring that you want), 2 tbsp. cream of tartar, 2 tbsp. oil. Stir ingredients together in a pot. Cook until mixture is dry and gummy. Knead until soft. Trash to treasures - These are ideas for using the things you would normally throw away every day, from making a turkey centerpiece out of a paper bag to dolls out of plastic bottles. This is from the web site http://craftsforkids.about.com that has craft ideas for free. It is well organized and sorted by subject, e.g., animals-creatures, musical crafts, holidays, multicultural, school days, etc. Construction site - Make a construction site in your house for kids who love digging and trucks. Take a cardboard box; seal the sides and bottom well with tape. Leave the top open. Pour in Grapenuts or the cereal of your choice, add some trucks, and you have entertainment (and maybe a snack!) Simon Says – This classic game can be played anywhere. The leader gives commands to the players, who must follow every command, except those not preceded by “Simon Says.”.. Anyone who follows a command that does not have “Simon Says” in front of it is out of the game. Statues –Turn some music on. Everyone dances or moves however they please. Turn the music off quickly. Everyone freezes while you count to five, then turn the music on again. Anyone who moves during the counting is out. A great group game. Invite the neighbors! Getting out of the house –adventures in Connecticut. If you or your children are “crawling up the walls,” go out and explore Connecticut’s many attractions.
Some options in the local area include: Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale (203-432-5050) Yale University Art Gallery (203-432-0600) Connecticut Children’s Museum (203-562-5437) Eli Whitney Museum (203-777-1833) Barker Character, Comic, and Cartoon Museum (800-995-2357) Kidcity Children’s Museum (860-343-0824)
A great resource for day trip ideas is Fun with the Family in Connecticut by Doe Boyle. Also, check the calendar section of your local newspaper and listings at the library. Local libraries may have discount passes to certain attractions. So next time the weather forecast calls for rain, relax, and have fun with the kids!

Christmas in the Village 2006By Keith Gordon
8th Annual Christmas in the Village will take place on Saturday December 2, 2006.
Christmas in the Village started over a cup of coffee and a Snapple at Tom’s Place. Tom Caliendo, owner of Tom’s, and myself were talking about how we could bring some additional unity back to the Village of South Meriden. We decided to have a yearly Christmas in the Village celebration not knowing if it would take off and continue. It took off and it has been continuing each year even though we did get snowed out around three years ago. Tom and I started to talk to other stake holders in the Village, i.e., business, neighborhood leaders, churches, schools, South Meriden Fire and our community police officers. Well, we put it together, and the first year we had over 600 attend. The event now brings over 2,000 each year to the Village where neighbors greet neighbors, friends meet friends, and newcomers come and meet new friends and families come together to enjoy the sprit of the holidays. We open the event with the Santa parade at 2:00 p.m. led by the Washington Drum Corp and a host of seasonal personalities. Santa is then stationed at The Fire Station where children get the opportunity to sit with Santa and tell him their holiday requests and get their pictures taken. Kellie and Sean Moore provide holiday music and sing-alongs from the beginning to the end at the fire station, along with face painting which is provided to all who choose to enjoy the art of Ruth Gordon from Fantasy faces by Ruth. For the past two years we have had Meriden Police crime prevention officer Tom Cirillo and his assistant doing AMBER Alert registration at the fire station. Also this registration helps keep our children safe and is a free service. South Meriden Trinity United Methodist has a children’s bazaar and games, and New Life Church this year will have a Living Nativity and goodies to munch on. If everything goes correctly Hanover School will have its annual holiday book sale also. The Main stage has entertainment happening during the event with master of ceremonies Ralph Riello giving away numerous gift items. There is the world’s best baked cinnamon apples stationed at Data Link Corp. located at Main and Camp Street, manned by Jim Cournoyer and Ed Haberli and crew. We have popcorn, chestnuts, cider, candy and hot chocolate. There are games and arts and crafts. The Meriden Library book mobile is out on Main Street also. We also have participation from the stores on Main Street, Deb’s Deli, Panda House, our New Karate School, Pet Parlor, Canine Training School, and the South Meriden Package Store. The two horse drawn wagons travel around the Village giving scenic rides, letting people off at several stops along the way. Hanover School students supply the artwork decoration for the storefront windows, and the Christmas in the Village committee decorates the streetlights with seasonal wreaths that have been purchased by the committee. South Meriden Volunteer Fire Fighters handle the Bon Fire each year that is located at the Riverside Park on Main Street. The Christmas tree at Riverside Park will be lit by a student from Hanover School while seasonal songs are song with Mr. and Mrs. Santa a little after 5:00 p.m.


The Happiness of Halloween – A Family that cares and shares.
We started out with a few airblowns, and over the years it has grown. We enjoyed our decorations for Halloween and noticed that other people were enjoying it too when we saw cars going by slowly or stopping in the street and camera lights flashing. We started decorating extensively for Halloween, adding several scenes and sections each year. Friends and family from all over the U.S. started sending us inflatables for gifts each year, and at times we would receive packages from strangers with airblowns too. We have had several people stop and ask us if we would like the inflatables they had because they were moving, or some said they didn't have the room to display them, and some thought we would display them in a scene. Just today, we received several boxes of pumpkin lights from a lady at our church. Of course we accepted them. People have been so generous! A lot of the displays were handmade by us, like the stuffed ghouls, the headless horseman display, the ghoul’s castle, or the dead-end cemetery scene. We decided to open our home to the public three years ago, and always invite people to stop by, park in the yard, and walk around the displays for pictures with the kids and for their enjoyment. We added the pumpkin patch the second year for the smaller children so it would not be too intimidating for them. We always give candy out to whoever visits us. We have even had people from Vermont come just to see it because relatives here told them about it. It is so heart warming to see the children and adults enjoying the displays. It has been a love effort by myself, my husband John, sister-in-law Annette, several family members, friends and our church family that has made our Halloween display a success over the years. We hope everyone will come by and see it. We just wanted everyone to know that we decorate extensively for Halloween and always invite the public to stop by, park in the yard, and walk around the displays for pictures with the kids and for their enjoyment. Here are a few of the pictures. Thank you. Visit Linda & John Mercier at 459 South Elm Street in Wallingford.


Why I love FallBy Nancy Freyberg
Fall is my favorite season. It is a time when my soul quiets and seems to open to all the natural beauty of everything around me. I take more time to appreciate God and all the blessings of life. I settle in a big comfy chair, think about starting a fire, get cozy, and remember my grandmothers and all they taught me. Fall is full of color and warmth, good smells from the kitchen, and wonderful memories. Fall makes me begin to think about Christmas and all the things I want to make for the ones I love most. Fall makes me always remember how blessed I am to have such wonderful memories and days now to keep making more.

A Sincere Thanks from our Family to Yours! By Sharon Agli~Pageau and Adam Pageau The sun shone brightly through the burnt red, orange, and yellow autumn leaves, on the day of our son, Hunter Christian Pageau's, Pasta Dinner Fundraiser, Saturday, October 14th at the South Meriden Firehouse. We felt blessed to be amidst not only nature's tapestry of beauty, as we have been indoors mostly for the last seven months by our son's side throughout his hospitalization, but also amongst the palpable warm love and support of our family, friends, various community participants and well wishers that came together that Saturday to honor Hunter's battle against his diagnosis of SMARD1 (Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress) and to encourage our commitment to raise awareness in the community in regards to what SMA entails and how it is affecting hundreds of thousands of families across the United States. On that crisp autumn day, Adam and I both witnessed the power of teamwork, community support, faith, hope and love. Many hours of dedicated service, along with firm resolve to make a difference not only for our family, but for all families we can reach through SMA education/awareness, went into making this event both successful and memorable. We wish to sincerely thank all of the numerous businesses from both Meriden and Wallingford, who generously donated an array of services and Raffle items to show their support and assist us in our efforts to both raise funds to assuage the astronomical medical bills heaped upon our family, and to acknowledge our steadfast commitment to make a difference in other families' lives through teaching others what SMA is and doing our best to raise funds for research for a cure for this presently incurable affliction. Most notably, we offer our sincerest gratitude to Keith Gordon and his wife, Ruth, for their dedication in standing by our family in its time of great need, and assisting us in putting this fundraiser in motion, along with their concentrated efforts towards success. I personally reached out to Keith via email in the wee hours of the morning one sleepless night here at the hospital, as I knew in my heart as a South Meriden native that the people of Meriden would come together to make a difference for one of its own. Along with Keith, I also shared Hunter's story with Mayor Mark Benigni, and other City Council Members, who have been very compassionate and helpful in our goal to make a difference in our community. For their concern, communications, and support, we thank them. Furthermore, our event would not have been possible without the willingness of the South Meriden Fire Department to kindly offer their firehouse, their second home, to us so openly and willingly, in addition to volunteering their services that day to work at the fundraiser. Their actions personify solid family and community values to the core, which is precisely how deeply they reached us with their generosity of service and spirit. Each and every one of you makes a difference. For those of you who purchased tickets in advance, attended our event, shared Hunter's story with your network of family and friends, your actions and your voices matter. Imagine the profound impact our joint efforts would have if each of us reached out to one other person to inform them what SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy) stands for, in an effort to increase awareness of an affliction that is sweeping our nation, unbeknownst to many. As parents of a terminal child, we can tell you that the journey we share with Hunter has been difficult enough, never mind facing the challenge that most, in both our community and the medical world, has never heard of the disease, nor is there a substantial base of knowledge/information regarding it's components. We are committed to doing our best to preventing this heartache upon heartache for another family. The Pasta Dinner Fundraiser was the first of many fundraisers to come in Hunter Christian Pageau's name, and we hope you will join us in our efforts to fight for a cure for this affliction claiming so many of our children. The sun wasn't the only source of illumination that day; the love and support of all who created the success that this event bestowed, the passion and commitment by all of you who wish to truly make a difference in the lives of others, we graciously acknowledge and receive your warm, compassionate light. It's the very light that effervesces from Hunter each and every day, as he exudes joy in a way that I wish to, in turn, share with you all. To experience the full circle of that faith, hope and love has been a great comfort to us. Thank you so very much for all of your kind and generous support! Together, we can continue to make a difference...

PEOPLE REALLY DO WIN! Our Trip to the Crazy Mountain Ranch in Clyde Park, Montana - Rosanne P. Ford & Mary E. Paluszewski Okay, where can we begin...It all started back on St. Patrick's Day 2006 when I came home to a priority envelope informing me that I won a “free trip.” Well, as anyone would think - this cannot be happening to me or this must be some hoax or timeshare deal, etc...But I could not resist. The letter said to call the toll-free number within three days to accept!!! (Being on a certain mailing list, I had apparently registered to win this trip at some point, of course NEVER believing it could happen.) Of course, from March until this month, I waited with much anticipation for my day to arrive. We found websites that tell you so much about the trip and rave about how wonderful it all is to experience. Was I really going to Montana – was this trip really for free - are they really going to send me free luggage, a check to cover the taxes for the 1099 they provide at the end of the year for taking their trip, and was I really going to walk into a room filled with fabulous gifts (too nice too mention - plus, I can't give away all of the surprises)! Then it all started happening and the dream started to come alive. I received a letter asking to complete some medical and background forms and return them promptly. In mid-August, our “Activity Packets” came along - choose your activities from horseback riding to off-roading, to a day at Yellowstone with an option for White Water Rafting, to fly fishing and clay shooting to name a few. It was fun organizing these activities from highest interest to low and our anticipation began to swell even more. As the time approached, and trust me the wait was long from August till the end of September, our airline tickets and baseball caps arrived with a letter stating to “wear these hats and meet your other ranch friends as you begin your adventure to Montana.” Then if that wasn't enough - luggage arrived a week later and the excitement really started! DAY 1 - Travel....I can honestly say that I barely slept Friday evening, October 6th, with anticipation of hopping on a plane at Bradley Airport for 8:00 a.m. There is nothing worse than waking up at 4:00 a.m. and wondering if when you get to the airport, is your ticket going to be a hoax! It wasn't! We arrived at Minneapolis/St. Paul Airport to see other folks wearing the provided “black baseball caps” - including a couple we met online from San Antonio, TX, that we hung out with for the entire trip. Hats off (literally) to Marlboro for this ingenious idea of providing everyone black baseball caps with the secret insignia on them to be able to meet your other traveling partners. This was a much needed icebreaker that led to a lot of introductions right off the bat easing your fears of what was about to begin! We arrived at the Bozeman, MT airport around 2:00 p.m. Saturday afternoon, and everyone was chomping at the bit to exit the plane and find out what we were in for. There had to be at least 35-40 of us already on the same plane going to the same place so it was a very anxious moment. We exited our gate and proceeded to the baggage area where we were met by various cowboys and a cowgirl welcoming us to the Ranch. At the airport, we were led to an area where we snacked, ate and drank for free, all compliments of Marlboro, while our guest services folks readied our paperwork, collected our IDs, gathered our luggage, etc. Yes - they took care of everything right from the start. We were then asked to “view” our luggage to be sure that it was all received and then ushered to the “bus.” The bus ride from the airport to the ranch was an hour long, however, the mileage is only about 25 miles the ranch and the airport are separated by many mountains thus causing you to go in a half circle but this was okay because we could smoke on the bus, take in scenery and yes, eat and drink more!!! We were advised to try to take full advantage of all there was to offer at the ranch - to experience the country as the folks there do - and, get a little crazy, after all, you probably won't see these people again... (Please don't let me forget to remind you of how much we got to eat!!!!) Upon arrival to the ranch we were ushered into the Stage Shop where we received our room assignments, keys and map of the little ranch town that was going to be our home for the next 3 ½ days. We were personally escorted to our room by a guest services guide - the staff there provided a level of hospitality unmatched by any experience I have had (and that's a lot to say as I've worked my entire life in hospitality). They even carried our carry-on bags for us? No, you don't do anything at this ranch, but relax and enjoy yourself. It was like Christmas when the door of our room opened and many, many gifts were nicely displayed on the bed for each of us. I could tell you what they were, but that would be giving away all the surprises for those who may get to encounter this same adventure one day. But I can tell you that the gifts were awesome and well worth the wait. I thought the luggage was good but this was even better. The rest of the afternoon and evening went by very fast - it was a long day, but we weren't ready to turn in early - we wanted to savor every experience. We were ushered to the saloon where we gathered every night at 5:00 p.m. for Happy Hour which consisted of drinks and appetizers. all included in our trip. This first night was fun - we got a little history on what was about to happen for the next few days, a history on the ranch town we were staying in and a history of some of the buildings...And there were a few rules to abide by while there!!!! No drinking in the streets, pick up all of your cigarette butts - do not dispose of them on the ground and drink lots of water - due to the altitude!!! Each night we moved from the saloon into the livery where we were treated to many good feasts as well as DJs, bands, karaoke, and an instructor that taught line dancing! What more could you ask for - all while they wined & dined us all night long!!!! We averaged about 4-5 hours of sleep each night - we were kept busy from the time we woke up 'til we left the saloon each night between midnight - 2 a.m. We stayed up each night hanging with our new friends (there were about 10 of us who really clicked and hung out a lot together - there were close to 90 people in our group from 10/7-10/10). After eating, karaoke, drinking, dancing, and poker (or pool - there were two tables, and one was over 100 years old) we headed to bed. DAY 2: Yellowstone Adventure...5:30 a.m. came early - that would give us plenty of time to shower, eat and be on the bus for 7:30 a.m. It wasn't easy, but we did it! What a breakfast spread, you name it, they had it. We were so full that when we stopped at our first rest stop on the way to Yellowstone, we were still too full to enjoy the display of cookies and treats laid out for us - we opted for hot chocolate only! On the ride to Yellowstone - and over the next few days we saw lots of wildlife including various types of deer, elk, antelope, and maybe a moose, but that sighting remains questionable! Yellowstone was beautiful - we enjoyed the scenery, visited the hot springs, took two small hikes, and enjoyed a lovely "boxed" lunch. When we entered the national park, we were actually in Wyoming! The end of our afternoon consisted of white water rafting of which all of our guides on the tour and in our rafts assisting us were all from Connecticut - CRAZY! I wish I had a recorder to get all of the info the guides gave us throughout the trip (including their corny jokes) as there is so much I can't remember. Our Yellowstone adventure ended when we arrived back at the ranch just in time for - you guessed it - Happy Hour!!! But this happy hour was enjoyed in the street of our little ghost town where we were able to “brand leather on our own,” lasso bulls, have our cowboy hats (another gift) fitted to our heads - and again, gathered with our newfound friends to exchange stories from the day and relax with more appetizers and drinks. We were gathered together - all 88 of us dressed in the same garb - for a group photo of the Ranch Party, October 7th trip, 2006 so that we will never forget the faces of the many friends we made. Much later that evening as we moseyed back to get some shut eye, a light snow was falling!!!! It was the beautiful! DAY 3 - A Much More Relaxed Day. We slept a bit later and sauntered to breakfast around 7:15 a.m. It was still flurrying out. Today our activities consisted of horseback riding, off-roading, and ahhhhh - a 30-minute massage - they also provided nice chair massages each day! We were very fortunate to get our horseback ride in as this activity was cancelled the rest of the day due to the slippery trails! Those of us at the ranch gathered back at the saloon for hot drinks and goodies while waiting for our next adventure. This day was much more casual - it gave us time to get some beautiful shots of the scenery, the buildings and some of the ranch folks and guest services people that were so kind to all of us during the days of our stay. We even visited the Sheriff's Office and had our pictures taken in jail! Our lunch buffet was spent eating and drinking and enjoying the many conversations that we were hearing about our friends who had been off-roading during the morning hours. This only made our off-roading afternoon experience more suspenseful. We were slated for mid-afternoon, and now could not wait. We took to the roads and 3:00 p.m. and got a quick tour of the mountains and off-road tracks. Then everyone got a chance to experience the ride firsthand by being the driver – oh, did I forget to tell you that we were off-roading in Hummer 1's!???? CRAZY! But once again, they had us back to the saloon in time for - you guessed it - Happy Hour!!! Where we ate and drank and gathered with friends! We had been gifted with a leather address book with mailing labels so that we could exchange info with the various friends we met throughout the four days (and, yes, so I just told you another gift that was received, but let me tell you there were about 12 in total)! This was our last night and everyone was very happy and relaxed. As we hit the livery for dinner, we were yet again surprised with a wonderful dinner and a beautiful send-off, compliments of our guest services staff. All of the staff took to the dance floor and did various line-dancing dances as well as danced with each other and kept us entertained for about an hour until the floor was turned over to the band called the "Saddle Tramps" who entertained us for the rest of the evening. What an enjoyable treat!!! They were great! DAY 4: Headin' Home..6:30 a.m. Tuesday morning came FAST - our awesome breakfast spread included made-to-order omelets today! Everyone was snapping their last pictures, enjoying their times together, taking in the scenery and fresh air, etc...We boarded the bus around 10:30 to return to the Bozeman Airport to take our flight home...we had been treated like royalty for four days, enjoyed food, drink, snacks and free gifts for four days and met some fantastic people - all compliments of Marlboro!!!! I can only end this story with a very large thanks to Marlboro and their guest services staff that accompanied us for four days in Clyde Park Montana at the Crazy Mountain Ranch. The staff and level of care received was above and beyond and could never be commended enough!!! We each find ourselves at odd times just smiling as we think about this adventure we experienced - an experience of a lifetime, that we can only share fully with our ranch buddies!!! We experienced a lot more that what we have written here. For reasons we can't disclose at this time. Like why one of us was nicknamed “The Bull.” We can't give everything away, and we need to leave something to the imagination. Now you tell me, doesn't this sound like a dream? You decide!!! I'm closing my eyes now- it feels like a dream.......


The Peoples' Press LOVES Diane Smith
Diane is the co-host of the top rated Morning Show on WTIC-AM News Talk 1080 with Ray Dunaway. An Emmy award winning TV journalist, Diane produces programs for Connecticut Public TV, based on her very popular series "Positively Connecticut." "Positively Connecticut" searches out the inspiring, warm, funny, and sometimes downright strange stories that give Connecticut its character. Her book by the same name has been a bestseller for The Globe Pequot Press. The sequel, Absolutely Positively Connecticut, was published in 2000. After 9/11 one reviewer called her book Christmas in Connecticut “the comfort gift of the year.” Diane's latest book Summer in Connecticut is a celebration of the season. For more than 16 years Diane was a news anchor and reporter at WTNH TV in New Haven, where her reporting earned her an Emmy award. Diane's documentaries have earned numerous state and national awards. The American Cancer Society has honored her for her work in educating women about breast cancer. The Connecticut Press Club honored her with its Mark Twain Distinguished Journalist of the Year award. Toastmasters International honored Diane with their Communication and Leadership Award. Diane is active in promoting Connecticut business and tourism. She was awarded the Connecticut Tourism Industry's Media Award for Positively Connecticut. For “showing Connecticut to the rest of the world in a positive light,” Diane was named Person of the Year by the Homebuilders Association of New Haven. Diane serves on the board of directors of the IMPAC-CT State University Award for Young Writers, and for the fifth year is the honorary chairperson of "The World of Words" programs held in libraries across the state and sponsored by the Connecticut Center for the Book. Diane served three terms on the board of directors of the Women's Campaign School at Yale University, a non-partisan organization dedicated to helping women attain public office. As a spokesperson for Easter Seals, Diane helped raise over eight million dollars for programs that help people with disabilities live independently. Diane graduated with honors from the State University of New York at Binghamton. She lives on the Connecticut shoreline and in West Hartford with her husband, Tom Woodruff, an economist. For more information see Diane's web site at www.positivelyct.com
Upcoming Shows:
Sunday, October 29th at 6:00 p.m.Monday, October 30th at 11:00 p.m.
CPTV Premieres a New Episode of Positively Connecticut Join award-winning broadcast journalist Diane Smith for an array of invigorating autumn adventures around the state when an all-new episode of Positively Connecticut premieres on Connecticut Public Television. Positively Connecticut is made possible through leadership funding from People's Bank. Additional funding comes from Comcast and the Connecticut Commission on Culture & Tourism. This edition of Positively Connecticut features: Dogged Determination (Bloomfield and Andover, Conn.) - Just as the new Lassie movie hits theaters, Diane finds some amazing collies in real life. A mere 10 miles from downtown Hartford, border collies are herding sheep, a pastime from long ago and far away. The Bloomfield Sheepdog Trial has become the toughest contest east of the Mississippi for dogs and their handlers - thanks to Beverly Lambert, one of the sport's top competitors, known by most people in town as the director of the Bloomfield Library. Out in the field, the dogs and their people are "reading" the sheep. The action is intense as the dogs work a flock through a grueling half-mile course. Connecticut's Unsolved Mysteries (Storrs, Windsor Locks, East Haddam, Griswold, Fairfield, West Haven, Conn.) - Solving history's mysteries is his favorite part of the job. Nick Bellantoni, Connecticut's official state archaeologist, is a little bit Indiana Jones and a little bit CSI. In this episode of Positively Connecticut, Diane joins Bellantoni as he uncovers details of the plane crash that gave Bradley International Airport its name. They search for more clues about the life of Venture Smith, a slave who became a free man, a Connecticut landowner and legend. In the middle of the city of West Haven, they find the home of Native Americans who lived there more than 5,000 years ago, and discover evidence of vampires in eastern Connecticut. That's Edu-tainment (Milford, Conn.) - When a school evaluation showed tardiness was a problem at Platt Technical High School in Milford, teachers came up with an answer that's become “must see TV.” Mild-mannered social studies teacher Pat Burke transforms himself into a superhero, a beach bum, an astronaut, a nutty professor or a time traveler when he takes to the airwaves every school day at 7:40 a.m. With the help of students in the school's television production classes, Burke offers both an entertaining alternative to snoozing through homeroom and a way to boost school spirit. Talking Music (New Haven, Conn.) - From the people who shaped the musical life of the 20th century, come their thoughts, in their own words, and in their own voices. Aaron Copland explains the unlikely naming of one of the best-known pieces of modern classical music, "Appalachian Spring." Eubie Blake describes the birth of ragtime. Duke Ellington talks jazz. They told it all to Vivian Perlis, who preserved it for posterity in a priceless collection of oral and video memoirs. The Oral History of American Music (OHAM) project continues to explore the minds of modern music masters. Delve into the archives with Diane at Yale University, and meet the woman who pioneered the practice of recording "oral history." Everything Old Is Old Again (Old Lyme, Conn.) - A century ago, Florence Griswold's boarding house in Old Lyme was home base for an American Impressionist artists' colony. Later, the Georgian-style mansion became a museum, and now, thanks to a careful restoration, it reverberates again with the life it had in 1910. Through an armchair tour of the Florence Griswold Museum, Positively Connecticut viewers will experience a snippet of a unique era in American art history - and feel the vitality of the artists who lived a bohemian life of camaraderie and creativity.


A SUMMER REMINISCENCE Don't you just love it when Mother Nature surprises you? As a gardener, I know I do. Now that things are cooling down, I'm reminiscing about the surprises of this past gardening season, especially those heavy-duty spring rains. Remember them? Sure they made the ground nice and soft for planting, and they provided the plants with plenty of water with which to grow. But where was the sun? On a spring vacation? And it's a rare plant that doesn't need some sun to bloom. Take sunflowers. They're named for the sun, they even look like the sun with their brilliant rays around their bright shining faces, and they need the sun to flourish. Sunflower seeds are what I planted during those dark spring rainy days. My iris corms didn't bloom in all that gloom, although their stalks grew tall and green. My sunflower seeds sprouted and their stalks grew quite study after all that rain. Kinda like Jack's beanstalk, they grew and grew all summer long, taller than my irises, taller than me, even. August came and great seed heads formed; but too late, I feared, for any sunflowers. I knew from past years that they bloomed late. Previously I had only planted dwarfs, and they had always brought cheer to the end of the season. But this year I had planted a mix. It was the tall ones that thrived in the rainy cool growing conditions. There they were, tall against the side of the house, against my bedroom wall. In the bedroom I had an unusual small window, shaped like a cellar window, right under my bedroom ceiling. I had never planted sunflower seeds under that window before. As I looked out at stalks and seedheads, I marveled at how special it really was that I had grown one of the only plants tall enough to be seen from inside that window. Well, Mother Nature had one last surprise for me. One morning in late August when I awoke, a shy lemon-yellow sunflower was looking in on me! What a way to end the summer season! This reminiscence now fills me with the warmth and promise of the summers to come. Pauli Gravel


Not Always Sour GrapesBy Chip
Pleasant outcome may happen when may not expect it if you only give it a try. Look at the brighter side of life and do not be pessimistic about the outcome. Seven years ago we had a house built on a 100 by 250-foot wooded lot. The back 125 feet were left in its natural heavily wooded state with a mixture of large trees with smaller trees underneath. An additional 10 feet along the street is city property. They periodically cut the brush and small trees to clear the area but 5 large trees were left standing. As in many natural areas in Connecticut, natural areas, this area was covered with grapevines. CL&P cut these trees to clear the overhead wires. This left a cleared area in this 125-foot section along the road. A single grapevine was left along a split rail fence at the property line. I thought that I would try and experiment with this single vine by training it along the fence. Grapevines grow very fast, and they are a nuisance because they cover everything it they are left alone. Vineyards prune every spring to have the vine produce fruit instead of foliage. This single vine was trimmed along the main stem to observe the results. The next summer it produced fruit along with the new foliage. When the grapes turned purple in the fall, we were surprised that they had the exotic delicious flavor of Concord grapes instead of sour wild grapes. Apparently, someone planted this Concord grape vine many years ago and it was neglected as wild grape. Concord grapes are not as popular since the seedless thin-skinned grapes were developed. Nevertheless, Concord grapes are available in stores during the fall season.


WOODCUTTERS BALLET By Phyllis S. Donovan Back in the Depression, laying in wood for the winter was serious business for families in our small village, tucked into one of the steep valleys of the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts. We burned wood in our old Black Glenwood kitchen stove as well as in our fireplace and it was up to our father to provide that wood. We were lucky. Our grandfather's land extended up one side of "our" mountain where there were plenty of trees to be cut for firewood. For many weekends throughout the summer, my father and his brothers would go up on the mountain and cut down the trees that would supply firewood for their families. Our winter comfort depended on the industry and success of that woodcutting project. We as youngsters weren't aware of all the back-breaking work that went into the preliminary stages of cutting down and trimming the trees. But on a couple of busy fall weekends, the uncles hitched up a rickety saw rig to their old Ford truck and hauled it up the mountain to cut the properly aged logs into firewood. It was an event that none of us cousins wanted to miss. Cautioned to stay out of the way, we would line up on one of the many stone walls our grandfather had single-handedly built to enclose the pastures he had cleared on the mountain for his cows. Munching on the few leftover frozen apples from his orchard, we would watch our fathers work and listen contentedly to the rhythmical zing-zing-zing of the whirring saw in the frosty fall air as it cut through the hard wood. The old puttering gas engine of the saw rig made so much noise that our fathers worked mutely in kind of a pantomimed woodcutters' ballet. One would fetch a trimmed log from the waiting pile and place it upon the movable platform of the saw rig which another brother would firmly press his whole body against, moving the log forward against the whining saw. Yet another brother would catch the chunks of wood and toss them up into the body of the ancient truck. As the truck filled up, a large mound of warm, sweet smelling sawdust collected beneath the saw rig. When the truck was full of wood, we kids would scramble over to climb aboard, being careful not to track through the sawdust which would stick to our shoes ad surely annoy our mothers if tracked into our houses. The expected treat for any of us who lasted through the whole day on the mountain was to clamber up on top of the load of wood and hitch a ride back down to our homes. There we'd help divide the wood, leaving some at each of our houses to be stored in barns and cellars for later use. We would make several trips up and down the mountain during the course of those late fall weekends. It was hard work for our fathers, but a fun time for us kids, and I still hold warm and comfortable memories from those days when times were hard, winters were cold, and people worked together to make things better for their families.


NATURE AS A MIRRORBy Dorothy Gonick
QUIET WOODLAND
The woodland beckons-To become one with nature We stroll hand-in-hand.
There’s magic in an early morning hike into the woods with a congenial companion, enjoying nature in all its beauty and variety, away from the everyday noise and bustle. As we start out the golden dawn of sunrise emerges before us, we leave the dew sparkled lawn and enter the shadows of the woodland where silence is all around except for the crunching of fallen leaves underfoot. Birds soon greet the dawn with cheerful song, accenting the quiet beauty of the woods. Butterflies are snippets of loveliness flitting from flower to flower, their colorful wings like flying petals. Near the path we see varied mushrooms, some like a russet umbrella and others atop slender stems. Unseen creatures have nibbled these morsels and we hope to see these creatures somewhere along our hike. Spider webs and anthills tell us that the woods are full of life, silently going about their business of living. We become aware of muffled sounds of buzzing, clicks, and squeaks of the insect world that we may not see. To quote Shakespeare, “The earth has music for those who listen.” We come to the clearing where glaciated boulders invite us to rest awhile and eat the crisp apples we have brought. Squirrels are gathering acorns nearby and we tempt them with our peanuts. It is fun to watch them snatch a nut, then scurry away before eating it or burying it for their winter food. Their fluffy tails twitch and twirl as they chase away. A black crow watches with keen eye for a chance to swoop down and claim a nut. The nearby brook breaks the silence with its soothing murmur as it flows over its pebbly bottom and we wonder if perhaps fish are swimming silently there. Nature flourishes in silence. Silently the sun, moon and stars move through the heavens. Tiny seeds sprout silently in the woodland soil. Plant life from trees to mosses grow in silence, yet it is not emptiness that we sense in nature, but a pulsating, living, embrace of heartening, silent wholeness. We return from our quiet hike through the woods enriched and content. We recall that Mother Theresa said, “We need silence to be able to touch souls.” And we note that our hike has touched our souls.


Bobbie’s Bevy of Beauties
The Montauk daisy and chrysanthemum plants have finally come into bloom. The dahlias are just beautiful with many unopened buds. Hoping this cooler weather we’ll be getting doesn’t turn into our first frost. If so then all of these flowers as well as the remaining perennials and annuals will exist no more. Two of my butterfly bushes are the size of small apple trees. A few blooms remain. So on the warm days the butterflies return. Remember not to cut the bush back until the last frost of next year has gone. Though it was not a flower but still a beauty Jimmy and I raised, was our beloved black and tan long haired dachshund, Tahrah. Since l961 we’ve had this breed of dog. Schnicklefritz and Arnie were brown male smooth dachshunds. Gesika (Jessica) a smooth brown female and her brother Spahtiwaht , a brindle (black/brown) wire haired. Tahrah was born on Friday August 11, 1989. She came to live with us on Wednesday July 11, 1990. A very beautiful, friendly and loving pet. Over the past year she acquired many medical problems. Nothing more could be done for her. So on Friday morning September 29, 2006 with Jimmy by her side and me cradling her head, cheek to cheek, Dr. Eric gently put her to sleep and sent her on her way to doggie heaven. We miss and love her so much, as we do all of our pets who were part of our family. The next issue will probably be my last until spring of 2007. Also have to start my hibernation plans.
Flowercerely yours,Bobbie G. Vosgien


Dear Housewives – Central Connecticut’s Think They Know It All Gals
Dear Readers, We hope you are enjoying your column. If you have a question that you need a neutral party to answer, please send it to us. We will answer questions about family life, book/DVD reviews, gripes in general, social or political issues, customer service problems, budgeting. You ask-We answer. All questions are confidential and can be anonymous. Just send them to Peoples Press via e-mail, U.S. Mail or fax. CHANGE YOUR BATTERIES IN YOUR SMOKE DETECTOR AND CARBON MOMOXIDE DETECTORS THIS MONTH! Sincerely,Your Housewives: June and Flora Dear Housewives, There is a parent at elementary school pick up in a big fancy SUV that places their five- or six-year-old in the front seat. I get worried about her safety. Should I gently say something or bud out? Concerned in Wallingford FLORA: Even in the child's best interest, commenting on someone’s parenting decisions can be uncomfortable. You can take the direct approach and say, “I don't mean to pry, but I see that you put your small child in the front seat. Did you know that the air bags, if deployed can severely injure or kill a child? “Or take the non-direct approach and alert the principal and a flier can go home in the backpacks. JUNE: Bud out! If you think the kids are in imminent danger, call the police. Many cars now have the airbags that automatically shut off if the weight isn't heavy enough in the passenger seat. If they have their seatbelts on and a booster seat (which you wouldn't see unless you look inside the car) they will be as safe as they would in the back. I like Flora's idea about letting the principal know to send out a flier, although, sometimes people don't recognize themselves when they read about a situation. Dear Housewives, What do you ladies think about parents bringing dogs of all types to school at dismissal time. There has been an occasional rottweiler and a pit bull mutt at my elementary school. It is unnerving and seemingly dangerous. Scaredy Cat of Dogs in Meriden, CT JUNE: I love the people who think their animals are people. "Hey skipper, let's go grocery shopping-oops you have to stay in the car and suck air out of a 1/2 inch crack in the window." Not fun for the dog. I don't care what kind of dog is there, schools are for people--leave the mutts home. I like dogs but there is no reason they need to go to school. Of course, this doesn't apply to utility dogs. FLORA: Have you alerted the school office staff about it? I am not sure if there is a law against dogs on school property. There should be common sense laws though. The older I get the more I see the dire need for good 'ol-fashioned common sense. Everybody thinks their dog won't bite and that their dog is so nice; you never know though. With dozens of children spilling out at the same time, it seems like a disaster waiting to happen. I hope there is an ordinance against it. JUNE: It can be dangerous for the dog too. GOOD DVDs TO WATCH Flora: For grownups: "Thank You for Not Smoking" (R) A comedy satire that centers on a tobacco industry lobbyist and how ridiculous our government can be and some of the spinning that goes on in Washington.
And for kids: "Kristen's Fairy House" Kristen vacations on a New England island with her aunt, an artist , that is writing a children's book about fairy houses built in the woods by children out of God made materials. It is a 40 minute non-rated journey of nature, respect for the earth and the bonding of a relationship between two people.
JUNE: Sorry folks, I can't add to this list at this time. I just had a new baby almost four weeks ago and have not had much time for books or DVDs lately. Hopefully I can add more next month. One thing you should do, get out and enjoy that beautiful foliage, pick apples and carve a pumpkin. Have a safe and happy Halloween.


“Sheltering an Animal’s Perspective” by Gregory M. Simpson
I had a dream the other night that I kept rescuing cats that looked identical to ones that I had already rescued. It was a nightmare that unfortunately is reflected in reality. Do the math. The average number of litters a fertile cat can produce in one year is three. The average number of kittens in a feline litter is four to six. In seven years, one female cat and her offspring can theoretically produce 420,000 cats. (Fertile dogs can have two litters yearly with 6-10 puppies in a canine litter). In my neighborhood alone, I rescued 20 stray, feral and abandoned cats, having them spayed, neutered and vaccinated before finding placements for them. Some went directly to good homes. Others were taken in by no-kill animal shelters, and the ferals were moved to barn colonies. The last in this series of 20 rescued cats was a mother who had two litters before she could be successfully trapped. We had a number of near misses before finally catching her. Her second litter of five kittens included three females and two males. Think of the number of cats that one litter could have produced. The Animal Welfare Federation of Connecticut (AWFCT) estimates that the population of free roaming and homeless cats in Connecticut is between 700,000 and one million. Usually spring is the heaviest season for kittens coming into our no-kill shelter. This year the onslaught continued straight through summer. In addition, by October, 126 animals had been abandoned at our shelter’s door. As I write this column, my orange tabby is resting contentedly on the rocking chair next to me. He was found starving and unable to move due to his entanglement in a flea collar. How lucky this cat is to have a home when there are literally millions of homeless cats. One estimate says that there may be as many homeless cats as there are companion animals. According to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association’s (APPMA) 2005-2006 survey, there are 90 million cats and 73 million dogs in U.S. households. That means 63% of all U.S. households own a pet, equating to more than 69 million households. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) estimates that there are an estimated six to eight million cats and dogs entering shelters each year, only half of which find homes, with the rest being killed. Again, that’s three to four million killed. Shelters that kill animals prefer the term “euthanasia.” The dictionary defines euthanasia as “the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured individuals (as persons or domestic animals) in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy.” These are not hopelessly sick or injured animals. They are three to four million adoptable animals. Only 2-5% of cats entering shelters each year are reclaimed by owners. The percentage is slightly higher for dogs, at 30%. Purebred dogs fare no better than mixed breeds, as 25% of dogs in the up to 6,000 U.S. shelters are purebred. Nearly all pet owners say that companionship and affection are the number one benefits to owning a pet. Return this kindness to cats and dogs by spaying and neutering them so that someday all will be able to have a loving home. Do not buy from breeders or pet stores. This only creates more overpopulation when there are already so many needing homes. Save a life. Find a new friend. Visit a shelter.
Gregory Simpson is Vice-President of the Meriden Humane Society, Inc. Board of Directors and a member of the Cat Writers’ Association. Formerly a state advisor to Friends of Animals, he was also named one of the 40 Ultimate Cat Lovers by CAT FANCY magazine.


“Thanksgiving Dinner: GENEROSITY Makes It Happen”
Turkey and all the trimmings will be enjoyed be everyone at the 26th annual holiday Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, noon to 2:00 p.m. Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day at the First Congregational Church, 23 South Main St., Wallingford. The dinner, sponsored by Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc. and the church, is free and open to all who want to spend the day with others. Transportation will be provided to those needing rides. Meals and visits will also be delivered to the homebound. Food baskets are sent out ahead of time. These dinners happen every Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter and are fully dependent on donations of food, time and money to be successful. In addition to the dinner at the church, baskets will be sent out ahead of time to families in Wallingford, Meriden and Cheshire. Meals and visits are also delivered to the homebound who are unable to participate in the dinners at the church. At Christmas, we “adopt” children and adults with AIDS, some folks who are differently abled, those who are alone, nursing home residents without family and other entire families as we learn of their particular circumstances. We provide them with food, clothes and gifts. We write cards and send letters to cheer people. It is incredible to be part of this effort and to see all the good that comes when people give and share. This year we will be collecting donations for a group of Wallingford schoolteachers and students who will be making a trip to New Orleans to help rebuild homes for the Hurricane Katrina families who lost everything. As this effort has become so large, it is necessary for us to collect food and other items as early as possible. We are in need of everything! Individuals and businesses that would like to volunteer their time, talents, food, gifts, money or services are encouraged to call Nancy Freyberg at Parents & Kids Foundation, Inc., 284-8299. There will be an organizational meeting at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, October 28th in the meeting room near the kitchen of the First Congregational Church for all who would like to become more involved in this effort. Together we make it better for everyone!


North Haven Garden Club Holiday Luncheon
The North Haven Garden Club presents the 2006 Holiday Luncheon on Thursday, November 30th at 11:00 at the New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave. with a Boutique, Raffle and Gourmet Table. The Program will be “The Little Black Dress” with Bill Graham, floral designer and lecturer. Donations are $35.00. For reservations, please call 203-239-3656 by Nov 21st.
Southwest Conservation District Cries “Wolf”
Hosts a visit from “Atka,” at the 60th Annual Meeting
The Southwest Conservation District will welcome the Wolf Conservation Center of South Salem, NY and their four-year old Arctic gray wolf, Atka, at the 60th Annual Meeting on October 30th at 7:00 p.m. The program will include brief District business topics, Nomination & Election of Directors, and a Presentation of Regional Conservation District Awards followed by a presentation on “Wolf Conservation” by Maggie Howell, Director of Education at the Wolf Conservation Center, who brings an awe-inspiring, up-close encounter with this important but misunderstood predator. Guests will learn about the history of wolves in the United States, the importance of wolves in a healthy ecosystem and the efforts under way to save these magnificent creatures for future generations. Founded in 1999, the Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) in South Salem, NY promotes wolf conservation by teaching about wolves, their relationship to the environment and the human role in protecting their future. The WCC accomplishes this mission through onsite and offsite education programs. These programs emphasize wolf biology, the ecological benefits of wolves and other large predators, and the current status of wolf recovery in the United States. The WCC also participates in the Species Survival Plan (SSP) and Recovery Plan for the critically endangered red wolf, and the Mexican gray wolf. For more information about the WCC visit the website at www.NYWOLF.org or call (914) 763-2373. For more information on this program please call 269-7509 or email to SWCD43@sbcglobal.net


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